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View Full Version : Drill press vice ???



rusted
05-23-2004, 11:46 AM
I've got a simple 12" floor drill press. I have the 4" machine vise that came with it. I've ditched the bolts and use a C-clamp and drill press locking pliers to clamp the vise down.

The problem is that it's a PIA to get the vise, work, and table where I want them. I'm wondering if a cross-slide vise is worth the investment?

I have been doing a lot of countersinking in wood lately building shelves, so I just set it up for production which isn't a big deal. But when I'm whipping something together, it would be nice to have easier adjustment.

What do you guys use?

fla jim
05-23-2004, 12:05 PM
I've got a "quick release" I've had for years. I think one of my sons got it for me. If you look you'll see I milled a shoulder on the jaws to hold flat stock even.

Franz
05-23-2004, 01:32 PM
The vise never being in the right spot is just something you learn to live with. Unless you are willing to spend $$$ for an X Y table, you eventually learn to clamp the piece in the vise, move the vise where you need it, and clamp the vise in place.
On the old Cast Iron machines, you could blot a vise in place on the table, and locate it by moving the table arm and rotating the table, but that feature was lost with the New & Improved machines.

Mike W
05-23-2004, 02:18 PM
80% of the time I don't clamp my vise. I just hold it with a gloved hand. It depends on the drill size I am using. :eek:

cutter
05-23-2004, 03:03 PM
I rarely use a vise on the drill press & when I do it is usually for drilling metal; for that I have a tilting drill press vise but for drilling wood I usually keep a sacrificial rectangular piece of particle board bolted to the table & then use a Tru-Grip linear tool guide as a fence. This is especially handy for drilling a row of holes at a uniform distance from the edge, as in adjustable shelving. And of course, you can use it as a skil saw guide; I use the 24 inch (26 in. actual size) mostly at the drill press & the 50 inch for sawing 4 x 8 sheets of plywood.

Like this:

Mike W
05-23-2004, 03:36 PM
Dang Cutter, you have the high tech stuff. I have to use a piece of square tubing and C clamps. :D

Paychk
05-23-2004, 03:44 PM
IMHO

This is the best drill dress vise on the planet.

http://www.eaglerockonline.com/WAHLSTROM/M189.htm

or this

http://www.eaglerockonline.com/WAHLSTROM/M189a.htm

for the ultimate vise setup add the 3-TS or 4-TS from here

http://www.heinrichco.com/gpvise.htm

This can be expensive setup if bought new, the Heinrich vise can be found on Ebay, for the Float-lock you may need to pay full price.

rusted
05-23-2004, 04:18 PM
Originally posted by Paychk
IMHO

This is the best drill dress vise on the planet.

http://www.eaglerockonline.com/WAHLSTROM/M189.htm

or this

http://www.eaglerockonline.com/WAHLSTROM/M189a.htm


That Float-Lock is awesome. That's exactly what I needed last night when I was drilling a supporting leg 3' long. It had to go in the long way, so the top wad wobbly. That float-lock would have fixed that.

THANK YOU!

Paychk
05-23-2004, 05:31 PM
No problem, used one of those way back in junior high shop class. Took 30 years to find it, but I did.

TonyC
05-23-2004, 09:25 PM
Rusted,
You've got the right idea. I started with a machinist's vise and used it once. I hated it. For 40 bucks you can buy a cross slide vise and you will never regret it. I love mine. It's basically an X, Y table on the cheap. You can dial everything in spot on!

Shade Tree Welder
05-23-2004, 10:40 PM
ohh just go buy a bridgeport and be done with it. :)

rusted
05-24-2004, 07:25 PM
Originally posted by Shade Tree Welder
ohh just go buy a bridgeport and be done with it. :)

I could've used one last night when I was drilling the threads out of a brass adapter fitting. The bits would catch and just suck themselves into the soft brass. :mad: Someday......

whodat
05-25-2004, 08:05 AM
I bought a cheap cross-slide vise from Northern Tool. It was worth what I paid for it (just barely). The slide mechanism is sloppy, the worm drives are pitiful, etc. That said, it's been clamped to my drill press since I got it and I don't plan to take it off anytime soon. It's so nice to clamp the workpiece in the vise and then just dial in where you want the workpiece to be. It's also great for drilling holes in a straight line; it doesn't matter how the piece is clamped, just lock one axis of movement and dial in the other.
whodat

morpheus
05-25-2004, 10:59 AM
Originally posted by Mike W
80% of the time I don't clamp my vise. I just hold it with a gloved hand. It depends on the drill size I am using. :eek:

I do the same as Mike, I have a 6" or so HF x-y cross-slide vise that just sits on the drilling table and I'll slide it to wherever is necessary and just hold it with a gloved hand.

But as you well know anything is always possible to happen ... in fact it's happened TWICE ... yep, a big drill bit caught and threw the cross-slide vise onto the floor ! :eek: Shop safety is must ... I've been working on the optimal location of one bolt to hold it down so that I can pivot it around somewhat and not have the thing maime me.

fbrown3
05-25-2005, 12:59 PM
I use an old screw type vise, better to use one than risk losing a finger or worse. I have had my glove get caught on the peice I was holding (luckily the glove came off!) It only takes a couple of seconds longer to clamp it down. I only do hobby stuff for myself so I don't need the fancy stuff, would be nice but a lot of it is out of my price range (got kids) they get most of the xtra money, of course some of you know that. By the way this is a pic of my latest projectmay25195 needed a place to put the cooler! hahaha.

JimK
05-25-2005, 09:31 PM
I do the same as Mike, I have a 6" or so HF x-y cross-slide vise that just sits on the drilling table and I'll slide it to wherever is necessary and just hold it with a gloved hand.

But as you well know anything is always possible to happen ... in fact it's happened TWICE ... yep, a big drill bit caught and threw the cross-slide vise onto the floor ! :eek: Shop safety is must ... I've been working on the optimal location of one bolt to hold it down so that I can pivot it around somewhat and not have the thing maime me. I don't recommend using just your gloves to hold materials in a drill press as I have had bad results from that. I have a large three phase drill press in my shop and a smaller drill press, I really like a vice that has buttress threads. I wont tell a fellow what to do, but if the material in the drill press gets loose it can cause you some problems. JimK

wlbrown
05-26-2005, 08:12 PM
RUSTED,
when you drill brass, you need to releive the
cutting edge on the drill. the reason, a regular
drill tends to grab when drilling brass. you have
to grind the cutting edge back at an angle of
about 10 degress, and this will prevent it from
cutting too aggressively. wish i could post a
picture of this, as i have some drills in my box
that i have ground this way. hope you can
understand what i am trying to say.
good luck with your projects.
wlbrown

JimK
05-26-2005, 10:09 PM
RUSTED,
when you drill brass, you need to releive the
cutting edge on the drill. the reason, a regular
drill tends to grab when drilling brass. you have
to grind the cutting edge back at an angle of
about 10 degress, and this will prevent it from
cutting too aggressively. wish i could post a
picture of this, as i have some drills in my box
that i have ground this way. hope you can
understand what i am trying to say.
good luck with your projects.
wlbrown I was told that also, and always start with a fresh sharpened drill bit, if it had been used on steel, then resharpen the bit. That may not be correct, but that is what I was told. Seems that the chart that I looked at showed different angles for brass, cast iron, steel, ect on the bit. good luck JimK

lotechman
05-27-2005, 12:18 AM
If one uses a loose vise or bare object to be drill I recommend the left hand rule. Always hold the item so that it sticks out to the left. When it grabs it will swing away from you and hit the drillpress column. I also use a stop bolt which is just a bolt sticking up on the drill press table on the left side.

Sandy
05-27-2005, 12:46 AM
I don't recommend using just your gloves to hold materials in a drill press as I have had bad results from that. I have a large three phase drill press in my shop and a smaller drill press, I really like a vice that has buttress threads. I wont tell a fellow what to do, but if the material in the drill press gets loose it can cause you some problems. JimK

I'm with Jim. I'm one of the worst for slapping something on the table and cramming the bit to it. After several near disasters over the years, one which ripped the cord of my 15 inch drill press out of the wall and another that ripped my jacket but did not rip my gut open, I decided to change my ways. The latest incident dang near took my left thumb. Smashed the thumb nail into the meat on both sides, split the left side of my thumb out and squirted blood for a month. Thin material, grabbed and bent and took my thumb in before I could think to let go. The mind tells you to hang on for some strange reason. That's the end of my holding firm.

Now if I don't clamp it (which is almost always) I at least use a back stop. Make one out of angle if you have to.

One other thing that happens when a drill bit cut's in, is that it also lifts the piece. I've screwed up a few hours of finish work by having a fine board lift when the bit grabs more than once. Lifts and peels up a lip, eggs the hole or goes too deep. When drilling precision depth holes the last thing you want is lift. With wood when drilling on the edge of a grain, the piece or bit or both will shift letting the bit go to the side of the grain and desired location. Point is there are more reasons than safety for vises and clamping.

If you need clamps, vises or jigs------------make em if you can't afford them. It pays off.