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View Full Version : I got my first job... sorta



aczeller
11-13-2007, 11:27 AM
okay, so i was in the chat room for a while and a couple guys were very helpful (you know who you are). i asked them how to get a few side jobs and they both replied to jsut get my name out there. well, the next night i went bowling with my girl and one of her friends. her friend had some of HER friends show up too. as the night went on, we started to discuss that i can weld and they need some stuff made... long story short, they want me to make a few SS shelves for a bar that theywill be starting up next year.

my question is as follows: What do i need in order to set up my welder (LE 100HD) for SS?

I know that the current self-shielded Flux-core wire is not the way to go, as this is only mild steel and will not stay rust-free. this is also not food-grade as it will eed to be. they will be shelves for in the kitchen of their bar.

i know i will need gas, but what kind? i plan on doing polished SS, most likely 304, but am open to toher suggestions.

I know i will need different wire, but what kind? it'll ahve to be compatible with the SS shelves and i want the welds to look good. any specific MFR's or sizes that anyone will reccomend?

I plan on running a few practice beads to get the hang of it before i do the job, but are there any things that i shoudl watch out for with the SS? i know it warps really easy, so i plan on using many clamps.

any reccomendations on regulators, gases, wires, etc. will be greatly appreciated. i don't expect to start this job for at least another month, so i have some time to pick and choose and do my homework, but i figured the sooner i can get the ball rolling, the better.

thanks

Later,
Andy

MoonRise
11-13-2007, 01:43 PM
Check your welder's manual. It should list some recommendations for gas and wire for working on stainless with that machine.

And you can check the Lincoln, Miller, Esab, etc web sites for info too. Go to Lincoln's site and get a PDF of their "GMAW Welding Guide", it's document number is c4200 on the Lincoln site.

But generally, for 304 stainless you can use 308 wire and some tri-mix gas. That will be for short-circuit transfer, which is all you'll be doing with that class machine anyway. Works just fine. If you had a BIG machine, you could do spray transfer but that would usually use a different gas (argon + 1-2% O2 usually).

aczeller
11-13-2007, 03:42 PM
thanks for the tip MoonRise... i never thought about the manual before... i'm not sure why. i remember seeing it in there before, but i guess i just wasn't thinking. LE actually makes a kit for the MIG conversion (K610-1)... pretty handy piece of info to know.

anyway, it seems to be a little fuzzy as to if i need an additional kit. i will probably get it anyway, just so i have it, but i'm wondering if i need it for this job. according to the LE manual, it says that part number "K664-2" is a "Aluminum or Stainless Kit". however, when i search for this part number, it is only defined as an "Aluminum Kit". do i need this kit for Stainless, or is it just Aluminum? like i said before, i'll probably get the extra kit anyway, but i'm not sure if i NEED it or not. maybe i'm just reading the manual wrong? i'll probably call LE after i get the job for sure (it's still up in the air) in order to clarify what it is that i need exactly, but i was wondering if anyone here would know off the top of their head.

thanks,

Later,
Andy

Flywheel
11-13-2007, 04:53 PM
Looks like the kit is for Aluminum - teflon liner and appropriate tips / roller.

I would not think you need that for SS - for Al - i think the sppolgun is the way to go.

Usually stainless shelves are bent or rolled to prevent cuts on the edges - this job sounds pretty involved....

MoonRise
11-13-2007, 05:03 PM
Per the catalog, K664-2 is just has a drive roll, non-metallic cable liner, 6 contact tips for 0.035 aluminum wire, and a 1 lb spool of 4043 MIG wire. All good and necessary for trying to do aluminum, trying being the main word there. Not needed for doing stainless.

re: Lincoln literature, also look up their PDF document c64000, which is a stainless steel welding guide. Some of the same info as in the c4200 GMAW guide, but only 40 pages and focused just on welding stainless steels via most methods and not just GMAW. As opposed to 96 pages and covering most GMAW.

tapwelder
11-13-2007, 06:13 PM
As stated, sounds pretty involved, though you can get it done. Get prices on custom ss shelving, your price should not be far from that. Get a down payment. Find out at what point they will you the final payment. Don't do it for zero profit.

This is not off topic, because you said, "... etc".



Good luck.

David R
11-13-2007, 06:29 PM
I agree with Tapwelder 100%.

I used to do a lot of kitchen stuff with an SP100. I used 316LSI because I was told it will weld all stainless. Pure Argon. Most of the time I didn't know what I was welding. Just "A sink" or counter top. I had to backpurge the stuff I did. Food grade. A flap disk is great on stainless.

Most of all, congrats on your first Job. Pics of the job if you can would be great.

David

Just get the heat right before you touch the "goods".

aczeller
11-13-2007, 06:40 PM
As stated, sounds pretty involved, though you can get it done. Get prices on custom ss shelving, your price should not be far from that. Get a down payment. Find out at what point they will you the final payment. Don't do it for zero profit.

This is not off topic, because you said, "... etc".



Good luck.


thanks tapwelder. i still have to look up the exact prices and get their measurements, but i figured they would start by buying the material (at least 75% of it anyway), then i would get the rest via a second payment. the second would include consumables, time and the rest of the material. i ahve no idea how much the consumables will be (no idea how big, or how many shelves), but i figured about $20 an hour for fab, then the MIG retro-fit kit would be covered. does that sound reasonable? i am not a professional welder (nor do i claim to be) so i don't want to high-ball the job and risk loosing it, but i don't want to be bent over either. for a job like this, you don't have to have any special certs do you? for food-grade welding? jsut curious.

thanks again.

Later,
Andy

Edit: i can get SS (any shape/size) at near scrap price thru work, so i think i will be pretty cheap compared to a professional job-shop.

aczeller
11-13-2007, 06:45 PM
I agree with Tapwelder 100%.

I used to do a lot of kitchen stuff with an SP100. I used 316LSI because I was told it will weld all stainless. Pure Argon. Most of the time I didn't know what I was welding. Just "A sink" or counter top. I had to backpurge the stuff I did. Food grade. A flap disk is great on stainless.

Most of all, congrats on your first Job. Pics of the job if you can would be great.

David

Just get the heat right before you touch the "goods".


thanks David. i appreciate your input. as far as back-purging, is it really neccisary? i have a feeling that it will mostly be extruded SS or wire-shelves. if i do plate, it will only be on the support posts. as far as the pics... i will most definately do that. it will probably be a while (they won't need them until about august at least), but i promise that if i get the job, i will show as much as possible. i will probably use it as my "show-piece" untill i can get a bigger/better job.

later,
Andy

sn0border88
11-13-2007, 09:10 PM
I wouldnt get polished stainless, its going to get all scratched and look like crap. I would get the brushed finish (its a grade or 2 below polished but still has a vinyl covering)

Unless of course they requested it. Also make sure that they know what kind of prices your going to be charging. Most times friends of friends dont really expect to pay much.