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View Full Version : My drill press chuck has gone out of whack



scott brunsdon
06-23-2013, 09:54 PM
It's a sturdy old thing and worked fine until yesterday (the shorting issue I had a month ago sorted itself out).
Yesterday it chewed up a couple of drill bits and it has a visible wobble at the drill tip. It didn't fall over or anything like that.
Is this a common thing?
How on earth do I get the chuck off? Not that I'll necessarily know what to do with it when I get it off. I'll just look at it and say, 'Yep, that's the chuck.'

mikecwik
06-23-2013, 10:10 PM
You might be able to get a rebuild kit depending on the brand. I think you should just buy an Albrecht. So little of the picture is helpful to me as to how it comes off.

Mick120
06-23-2013, 10:18 PM
Scott,
The chuck is on a taper, when you lower the spindle, you'll see a slot through which a tapered drift is fitted to remove the chuck.
Just fit a new one, making sure you get the correct taper....take the old one to your supplier, they'll match it.
...

scott brunsdon
06-23-2013, 10:49 PM
I think I know the slot you mean, Mick. And I'm guessing a 'tapered drift' is something I tap in there. I'll give it a go. I thought I would need to unbolt something to get it all out.
Maybe if I get it out and put it back it will be fine. (That seemed to do the trick with my shorting issue - I pulled a few things out and put them back and it's been fine ever since.)

WyoRoy
06-23-2013, 10:55 PM
Looks like it might be a Jacobs SuperChuck. If so, get a rebuild kit for it as they are good chucks. I haven't looked, but I'd suspect there are videos over on YouTube for both removing the chuck from the drill press as well as repairing the chuck with a rebuild kit.

Tapered drifts....
http://www.millerstooling.com.au/cmsimages/drilldrifts003.jpg

Mick120
06-23-2013, 10:56 PM
Here's a pic of mine, just removed to show you.....easy job.
...

tackit
06-23-2013, 11:02 PM
You can buy chuck removal wedges, use two, to remove the chuck from the machines arbor and a drill drift to remove the arbor from the machine. There might be a screw inside the chuck that has to come out, use a mirror to check.

If you have a piece of hard wood you might be able to cut it down to a 1" or so square and about a foot long and lay it on the chuck and hit the wood with a hammer to get it out.

Here's what both chuck removal tools look like.

http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INPDFF?PMPAGE=551&PARTPG=INLMK32

WyoRoy
06-23-2013, 11:05 PM
You can buy a chuck removal wedge to remove the chuck from the machines spindle and a drill drift to remove the chuck from the tapered arbor.

You've got the tools and there uses backwards.

EDIT: It is easier to just drill a hole down the center of the chuck after opening it all the way instead of using the Jacobs taper wedges to remove the chuck from the arbor. The Jacobs wedges really don't work all that well. Once a hole is drilled through the chuck body, place the chuck on your shop press and exert a bit of pressure down through the hole onto the arbor and it will pop right off...method is outlined on the Jacobs site...or at least it was before they went offshore with their manufacture.

tackit
06-23-2013, 11:11 PM
You've got the tools and there uses backwards.

Thanks for the education Roy, I'll remember that. :drinkup:

Mick120
06-23-2013, 11:22 PM
http://www.jacobschuck.com/support.asp
...

WyoRoy
06-23-2013, 11:24 PM
Once the chuck is removed from the drill press check all your mating surfaces. Both the Morse taper and Jacobs taper are a work of beauty, but once spun they tend to gall and things get ugly. If everything looks good, or at least not torn to Hades and gone, clean the mating surfaces and slap it all back together...use either a soft faced mallet or a piece of wood on the drill press table to run your chuck against the wood with the quill extended to mate the chuck (machine off BTW). If the tapers are galled you may be able to stone them down back into usable condition...don't go overboard, just the galling needs to be removed as you want an interference fit on the tapers.

WyoRoy
06-23-2013, 11:28 PM
Damn, that Atlas is an exact match on my 25+ year old Harbor Freight drill press! Guess the Chinese knew a good design when they stole one.:D

scott brunsdon
06-23-2013, 11:41 PM
It is all much clearer, guys, thanks. (Seeing it out and sitting on a bench was great, Mick.)
I'll have a go one night this week at pulling it out. Hopefully a good clean will do the trick. It's all pretty sturdy so I don't think anything I did when using it last could have bent the arbor or anything like that.


you want an interference fit on the tapers

I'm guessing the bits are not supposed to be lubricated when put back together?

scott brunsdon
06-23-2013, 11:50 PM
Damn, that Atlas is an exact match on my 25+ year old Harbor Freight drill press!

I'll see if I can find a date. I'm guessing 1970s. It is stamped 'Made in Taiwan'.

WyoRoy
06-23-2013, 11:54 PM
[QUOTE=scott brunsdon;2794581I'm guessing the bits are not supposed to be lubricated when put back together?[/QUOTE]

No lubrication! Fact of the matter...might want to use some acetone or whatever similar you have around to clean the tapers well.

WyoRoy
06-23-2013, 11:55 PM
I'll see if I can find a date. I'm guessing 1970s. It is stamped 'Made in Taiwan'.

In that case, probably the same manufacturer.:drinkup: If that is the original chuck and it was sourced from Taiwan as well...scrap it and buy a better one. I saw a drastic improvement in my old Harbor Freight drill press...even from when it was brand spankin' new...by just swapping a used Jacobs Superchuck onto it. If you are gonna spend the bucks, get an Albrecht or older SuperChuck as since the Jacobs brand has gone overseas I don't know if I'd recommend a new one.

scott brunsdon
06-23-2013, 11:59 PM
Got it. No lubrication. I'm sure I've got some acetone out the back somewhere. I'll photograph the chuck when I get it out. My nephew will know where in Sydney I can get a chuck if I need one. He mentioned a place out west that sells good second hand ones.

WyoRoy
06-24-2013, 12:07 AM
Got it. No lubrication. I'm sure I've got some acetone out the back somewhere. I'll photograph the chuck when I get it out. My nephew will know where in Sydney I can get a chuck if I need one. He mentioned a place out west that sells good second hand ones.

Sydney?!! God only knows what a good brand chuck would be if you're talking Australia. Do the motors spin backwards like the toilets?

scott brunsdon
06-24-2013, 12:24 AM
Yep, the Sydney in Australia. I suspect it's only water that spins in the opposite direction. We would have got lots of stuff from the US before China became the world's supplier, so there will second hand Jacobs ones around. Hard to know if they're any good I guess. There will be new ones, too.

Sandy
06-24-2013, 12:36 AM
This is an interesting site I keep stuffed back in a file in a dark corner. Don't get to it much any more. Covers a lot of the older methods and means. It's kinda fun to cruise around in every now and then. When you 1st open it you'll be in the "jacobs" page. Be sure and click on the "morse" link too. Well, any of em that you want I guess. :)

http://www.beautifuliron.com/jacobs.htm

scott brunsdon
06-24-2013, 12:42 AM
Thanks Sandy. It's funny, being just a DIY guy, it has never occurred to me that there could be good and bad chucks. I've always just thought there were chucks.

Sandy
06-24-2013, 01:15 AM
Thanks Sandy. It's funny, being just a DIY guy, it has never occurred to me that there could be good and bad chucks. I've always just thought there were chucks.

Well then there is the price of the unit vs what you're going to get out of it to consider. A decent jacobs chuck is probably equal a third of the original cost of one of the older HF units. :) The average dyi guy may not drill 3 or four 3/8ths holes a year in steel. More in wood probably. Those lowbucks units work great for that. I used my old HF unit for a whole hoard of wood working for years till I had to give it up. Steel is a nuther story. I've got it setting off to the side now, waiting to pass it on to whoever needs one.

Kaos
06-24-2013, 01:22 AM
Being as old as it is could it be a bearing has gone out?
Just a thought.
I bought a used drill press that had a bad wobble, turned out that the arbor was bad, possible someone had hit the chuck with a hammer or something. Had to have the arbor turned on a lathe to get the wobble out.

Mick120
06-24-2013, 01:26 AM
Scott....If you have to get one, Hare & Forbes are a good bet.

http://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Drill-Chucks
...

Sandy
06-24-2013, 01:28 AM
Could be just rusty and one jaw not sliding right. Don't they sell WD-40 in Auzzieland ? ;)

Do you tighten all the way around when you put a drill in?

scott brunsdon
06-24-2013, 01:38 AM
Tighten all the way round?

Sandy
06-24-2013, 01:44 AM
Tighten all the way round?


Use all three keyholes. Snug one, move to the next and snug it more then the last one give it a good crank.

scott brunsdon
06-24-2013, 02:18 AM
So that's why there are three holes.

I'll get it out, give it all a clean, put it back together, use all three holes, and report back.

Mick120
06-24-2013, 03:04 AM
And....make sure you fit the drill properly.
I've done it myself more than once, particularly with smaller bits....:rolleyes:
...

scott brunsdon
06-24-2013, 08:04 PM
Gee, that was easy.
My uncle gave me a bunch of his old drill bits when he moved into a retirement home last year and yesterday I sort of recalled seeing something in there that looked suspiciously like a 'tapered drift'.
The shaft (arbor?) had a few smears of stuff on it, so I'll give it a clean and clean where it sits.
I'm not keen on trying to get the arbor out of the chuck, though I might give it a go - I can see inside it where I would put a punch and give it a whack. If it doesn't come out easily, I'll leave it there.

jakeru
06-25-2013, 01:28 AM
Don't use thread locker on the taper either (not if you want tone able to remove it again, at least.) Also, don't ask me how I know this. :p

scott brunsdon
06-25-2013, 03:05 AM
Not much chance of me using thread locker given I don't know what it is. I'm guessing it might take the 'interference fit' a bit far.

Mr. Moose
06-26-2013, 12:23 AM
With taper seated chucks, you can get them out of true by "milling" with them, or by whacking them on the side. That can cause the chuck to be off kilter on the taper of the drill arbor, or the drill arbor to be off compared to the taper of the drill spindle. It could also be that one or more of the jaws has gone off, but I'd bet it needs to be reseated on the tapers in the correct location.

scott brunsdon
06-26-2013, 04:10 AM
Thanks. I'm going to have a go at getting the arbor out of the chuck and then reseating both of them. Hopefully that will do the trick. At least I now know that getting a replacement chuck and fitting it is not a big deal. When I looked at the drill on the weekend after it went out of whack, I was imagining trying to get the whole thing somewhere for somebody to fix it.

scott brunsdon
06-26-2013, 08:18 PM
Got the arbor out of the chuck. One tap is all it took. More gunk on that end than the other end. I'll clean it all up on the weekend and put it back together and see how it goes. Isn't it good when stuff is made in a way that makes them easy to fix.

jakeru
06-27-2013, 01:15 AM
Not much chance of me using thread locker given I don't know what it is. I'm guessing it might take the 'interference fit' a bit far.

This should clear it up:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thread-locking_fluid