PDA

View Full Version : Diamond Plate Question



Beggining2Weld
07-26-2009, 05:09 PM
Hey Guys

I have been cutting some diamond plate for a golf cart maybe 1/8 thick or thinner. I have been cutting it with a table and a circular saw. The cutting is going okay...but does anyone have any advice how to clean up the edges? How to mooth it out a little more and hide some little curves, bumps, and sharp edges.

Boostinjdm
07-26-2009, 05:14 PM
a straight edge and a flapwheel or file will do it.

aevald
07-26-2009, 06:20 PM
Hello Beggining2weld, the other poster gave you a great suggestion. You might also consider using wax on your saw blades before you cut, regular paraffin wax will work, DoAll also makes a cutting wax that is used on many vertical band saw applications that works really well, this might prevent any gauling that could affect the cut edge as well. Another possibility for providing a nicer edge would be using a laminate trimmer with a carbide bit, routers and a "fence" of some sort to guide the router may be the answer too. One final comment has to do with the blades that you are using, try to find a blade with the most carbide teeth possible, that will minimize the amount of uneveness and provide for a reasonable smooth cut edge. A bit more for you to consider. Best regards, Allan

bubb
07-26-2009, 07:32 PM
clamp plate edge to table /bench use belt sander with 40 grit...run vertical along edge in up/down motion...give in the belt will allow you to control profile of finished edge...:drinkup:

Machinereaper
07-26-2009, 07:35 PM
Belt sander or wire wheel

Machinereaper
07-26-2009, 07:53 PM
When you cut use a blade that at least 3 teeth are cutting the cross section of the material. May need to adjust the height of the blade to achieve this. Use a spraymist coolant or WD 40 spray works good to. Should get a good clean cut with a small burr.

SundownIII
07-26-2009, 08:12 PM
Cutting aluminum sheet/plate with a skilsaw is one thing. Kickback can be controlled.

Cutting aluminum sheet/plate on a table saw is flat out dangerous.

Machinereaper
07-26-2009, 08:36 PM
Cutting aluminum sheet/plate with a skilsaw is one thing. Kickback can be controlled.

Cutting aluminum sheet/plate on a table saw is flat out dangerous.

No more or less dangerous than cutting wood when done correctly.

FusionKing
07-26-2009, 10:57 PM
Hey Guys

I have been cutting some diamond plate for a golf cart maybe 1/8 thick or thinner. I have been cutting it with a table and a circular saw. The cutting is going okay...but does anyone have any advice how to clean up the edges? How to mooth it out a little more and hide some little curves, bumps, and sharp edges.


I have a good bit of exp. working with this material. I use many different saws and almost always my "go to" cleanup tool is a double cut bastard file. It is a 12 incher and I use it sideways a lot or "drawfile" style. It never wears out and also is better for welding prep because it doesn't put crap in your weld like sandpaper does.
Another good method I use is simply turning the welder way down and running a tig bead down the edge. You see this done on a lot of marine fab and it looks pretty cool.
For nicer raw edges the above methods work well also. HTH

Beggining2Weld
07-26-2009, 11:43 PM
Ok guys, thanks alot for the advice. Im going to be going to aberdeen proving grounds in a few weeks for a 6 month welding and machine school. (USAF) but I think I will always come to this site when I get stuck in these pickles.

I am going to try all of those techniques when I get home from base tommorow.

SundownIII- Not to disagree with you at all, but how do you figer one is more dangerous than the other. They both have almost the same blade. The table saw actually keeps it a little more sturdy. I actually went from Circular to Table saw. The only dangerous thing I would say is the tiny pieces of aluminum hitting me everywhere. I am actually out there with a welding helmet with the flap up. But what should I actually be watching out for? I just want a heads up..

gordfraser
07-27-2009, 12:09 AM
Cutting aluminum sheet/plate with a skilsaw is one thing. Kickback can be controlled.

Cutting aluminum sheet/plate on a table saw is flat out dangerous.

I always lower the blade in the tablesaw when cutting alum. so it just cuts through the material.
I cant see where it is dangerous unless you are trying to crosscut on the tablesaw without a sled or sliding table.....that it even dangerous with wood.

SundownIII
07-27-2009, 12:23 AM
Beginning2Weld,

I always cut my aluminum sheet/plate with the Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw with an aluminum blade using a 2"x2" piece of angle aluminum as a guide.

If kickback occurs (seldom) the saw simply "kicks back" in my hand. On the Delta table saw (3 HP), the whole sheet is impacted should a kickback occur, with much more force I may add. It's your hands, arms, eyes, whatever, do as you wish.

I do quite frequently cut small angles on a standard mitre saw vs setting up the Porter Cable dry cut saw. Here the force of the cut is against the fence versus back at you.

I seldom cut aluminum plate with the plasma due to the amount of cleanup/edge prep required for tig welding.