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View Full Version : What A Dumb Fuch I am...



zapster
12-21-2013, 10:39 PM
Yesterday (Friday) morning I went out and started my truck @ 3:45 AM like usual to let it warm up...
Came out 10 mins later and it was still running but when I put it in gear and went to go...
Nothing happened..

The throttle pedal was working but it would not rev up and then just died and would not start.
Been their before so in the house I went and back to :sleeping:

Called my mechanic to come with the ramp truck and get it.
(Last year it was the Thursday before X-mas when the cam follower went astray and on the ramp truck it went)

He took it to his shop and called me an hour later and said it was all set..Running perfect!
He then told me "Your not going to be happy either"..

"Why is that" I said..

"Because I put 2 gallons of OIL in it and all is well"..

DOH!!!!!!

Me bad or what?:help:

FIRST time that has ever happened to me and I had heard that low oil will result in no run when it comes to a 7.3 Diesel..

So let that be a lesson to me.

130$ later....

Oh well live and learn...

Happy ho ho.



...zap!

duaneb55
12-21-2013, 10:44 PM
2 gallons? Doesn't Ford provide dipsticks in their engines anymore? :eek:

mikecwik
12-21-2013, 10:48 PM
There is no value in letting an engine idle for that length of time. It actually is a waste.

mikecwik
12-21-2013, 10:57 PM
Fuchs makes some good stuff.

RealMcCoy
12-21-2013, 11:00 PM
Is it an early Powerstroke? We used to re-seal a lot of injectors due to them shoving high pressure oil by the seals and back into the fuel return.

Had one get towed in that had been topped off before leaving the auction where it had been purchased, and didn't make it the 175 miles home before it had pumped 10 quarts into the fuel tank...

7A749
12-21-2013, 11:15 PM
Better a DUH moment than a serious, expensive problem to deal with.

Been there with machinery. Sure, it stings a little, but turn it around & be happy it was just an easily fixed issue & not a nightmare before Christmas kind of problem :)

ls1ta
12-21-2013, 11:15 PM
There is no value in letting an engine idle for that length of time. It actually is a waste.

Really? I always thought it was better to let it warm up and take the loss in gas vs the maintenance/repair of not letting a car warm up.

Provided it's a bigger engine, etc.

SquirmyPug
12-21-2013, 11:16 PM
2 gallons? Doesn't Ford provide dipsticks in their engines anymore? :eek:

I'm sure they do.. If you see oil on the stick there is too much right?

zapster
12-21-2013, 11:25 PM
2 gallons? Doesn't Ford provide dipsticks in their engines anymore? :eek:

Yeah they do..
When the pan was leaking I checked it every Sunday..
After the new pan I checked it a couple of times and then just forgot about the routine..


I will check it tomorrow.


...zap!

Dualie
12-21-2013, 11:26 PM
with the HEUI injectors i had a customer that put 45 GALLONS of oil into a cat 3126 in a 800 mile trip. at some point i think was just injecting engine oil instead of fuel.


At some point you would have thought they would have tried to figure out what went wrong

zapster
12-21-2013, 11:27 PM
There is no value in letting an engine idle for that length of time. It actually is a waste.

Ever try to drive a cold diesel?

They don't like it.
Transmission don't like it either.


...zap!

DSW
12-21-2013, 11:46 PM
Ever try to drive a cold diesel?

They don't like it.
Transmission don't like it either.

Yeah my tranny on the F250 really doesn't like it if I just jump in and try and drive off when it's really cold. I try and make it a habit to start the truck and at least let it warm up for a few minutes before I go anywhere this time of year. I can't afford to destroy the tranny right now.


Reminds me before it starts raining tomorrow, I need to go over the fluids in the truck and plow pump again.

Blackbeard
12-22-2013, 12:35 AM
My diesel sounds like someone's under the hood with a hammer when i crank it if it's cold out. Sure not gonna run it like that!
I had the oil changed in my freight liner one time and the dumb azz drained the oil and put 50 quarts in before he realized it was going on the floor!! He forgot to put the plug in. I walked around the corner and was in disbelief that he was actually standing in it and didn't know it.

MinnesotaDave
12-22-2013, 12:43 AM
Ever try to drive a cold diesel?

They don't like it.
Transmission don't like it either.


...zap!

One of my dad's friends jumped in his diesel while ice fishing at -40F and tore off.

Pop - blew it up - was only a few years old.

I only own gas motors and almost never warm them up - but I try to go easy, when I leave. :o

12345678910
12-22-2013, 01:46 AM
There is no value in letting an engine idle for that length of time. It actually is a waste.

I'm guessing you've never seen snow, or parked outside.



10 minutes is nothing, especially on a Diesel, especially when you need to defrost the windows.

Driving when you can't see - that's a problem.

mikecwik
12-22-2013, 08:18 AM
I never had a problem in cold weather before with a diesel other than getting one started. Its kind of crazy Fords automatic transmissions don't like the cold. Progress always isnt I suppose.

I would not hop in a vehicle and tear off if the temperature was 90f. A cold seizure in a modern engine or an old one can't be blamed on the cold if in fact that is what happened.

You're killing your engine letting it idle it is even worse on a diesel than a gasser. The engine needs heat to operate efficiently an driving it to warm it up is the best way to do that. I always drive gently to get an engine to operating temperature. You would be better served plugging it in for an hour or whatever as you gain a feel for the outside temperature and how much time you like. I think its rather a waste when I hear guys plugging them in as soon as they get home for the night.

Keep in mind even if you let the engine idle and heat a bit the rest of the vehicles components need to be warmed up with gentle driving in extreme cold.

CEP
12-22-2013, 08:43 AM
It never gets cold here, and I let my 6.7L Cummins warm up all the time. :confused:

weldermike
12-22-2013, 08:58 AM
My Kubota diesel sounds like a hardware store in a earthquake when it gets real cold. I let her warm up for about 15min when its really cold.

duaneb55
12-22-2013, 10:17 AM
Is it an early Powerstroke? We used to re-seal a lot of injectors due to them shoving high pressure oil by the seals and back into the fuel return.

Had one get towed in that had been topped off before leaving the auction where it had been purchased, and didn't make it the 175 miles home before it had pumped 10 quarts into the fuel tank...


Yeah they do..
When the pan was leaking I checked it every Sunday..
After the new pan I checked it a couple of times and then just forgot about the routine..


I will check it tomorrow.


...zap!
Sounds like you may need to have your mechanic guy investigate a little deeper. Checking the oil daily for a few should give you an indicator.

zapster
12-22-2013, 10:54 AM
Sounds like you may need to have your mechanic guy investigate a little deeper. Checking the oil daily for a few should give you an indicator.

I have not looked at since July...
And I drive it everyday.


...zap!

deepskyridge
12-22-2013, 11:13 AM
I have a 2005 F-350 6.0L Diesel, I had that happen twice to me. This past summer while on a trip through Colorado, I got to replace the FICM and have this seals and standpipes replaced on the High Pressure Oil for the injectors. Some guys do this as a proactive measure before it fails completely. Hope you have good luck with yours.

Gary

Bluewelders
12-22-2013, 12:59 PM
We should start a list of weird things that happen when it gets 20-50F below zero.

Warming up a car in below zero temps is just silly,the defrosters will start working eventually.
Just drive it blind for about five miles and if you are still alive and haven't killed any one ,you will have saved a couple of bucks worth of fuel.

baddog
12-22-2013, 01:00 PM
Sorry to hear of the "doh!" moment, been there too.

On the warm up, diesels use forged pistons, which expand more than common cast pistons. So they have more clearance cold. Modern alloys have reduced the problem, but running a diesel, particularly an older diesel (even more so a turbo diesel) with any load when cold can cause a number of problems. In Phoenix, my Duramax gets at least 30 seconds in the summer, maybe a minute in the winter, but doesn't really seem to care when I am in a hurry and must crank-n-go. My old 6.2 on the other hand, and my Kubota tractor, if you don't let it run for at least 4 or 5 minutes before reving or putting under load, it sounds down right scary.

And then there is the oil. My daughter now lives in Fairbanks AK with 2 vehicles outside and no garage (Army housing). Even with oil pan heaters (and others) they have to crank things ever so many hours (through the night) AND let things warm up before moving vehicles. But that's dealing with -30 F ambient and lower.

Stick-man
12-22-2013, 01:17 PM
Glad it wasn't anything serious Zap! My '01 7.3 will automatically idle up to 1k or so RPM after a few minutes. I usually let it do that for 5 minutes, then drive really slow for a bit. Letting a diesel idle too long is not good, because it will cool down. However, ten minutes in the winter is not excessive. And because mine will auto idle up is all you need to keep it from cooling down. Back when I was working around the clock in my semi, I would catch a couple hours of sleep when I could. I just bumped up the RPM on the cruise control. Then you're not hurting it.

shovelon
12-22-2013, 01:21 PM
I have not looked at since July...
And I drive it everyday.


...zap!
Jeez, you are worse than my wife!

G-son
12-22-2013, 01:30 PM
I know we're crazy here in Sweden, but we use electric engine heaters and electric heat fans inside the car. All plugged into the outlet at the house/parking spot, preferably on a timer. A more expensive option is a fuel burning heater doing the same job, the upside is that it doesn't need a cord plugged into an outlet near the car. Nice and warm car before you even look out the window.

zapster
12-22-2013, 02:00 PM
Jeez, you are worse than my wife!

Heh...
Not any more.

Just checked it.
Full.


...zap!

zapster
12-22-2013, 02:02 PM
I have a stock engine coolant heater that I use when it gets to 20 degrees or below..
It's on a timer that starts at midnight and shuts off @ 8 AM...

INVALUABLE in the cold.


...zap!

MinnesotaDave
12-22-2013, 02:20 PM
We should start a list of weird things that happen when it gets 20-50F below zero.


How about when it's -30F or colder, it takes a while before the flat spot "rounds out" and quits feeling like I have square tires ;)

Or when I thought it was warm enough to just drive and 2 miles down the road the windshield flash frosts inside and I have to stop and scrape the inside since I didn't warm it up and have no heat to defrost it yet.

-40 and the key tumbler snaps off on a ford propane truck so I have to start it with a screwdriver.

-45 and the master cylinder froze on my 1977 f150, could not push the pedal in for half hour. Had to flush the system later with fresh brake fluid - I guess it really does absorb moisture over time :)

M J D
12-22-2013, 02:42 PM
How about damn near breaking the shifter off because you left it in gear.Blower motors that worked fine decide to not turn. When you try to open the hood to check something and the cable snaps. Good times .

Bluewelders
12-22-2013, 04:20 PM
You have to hold the clutch in for about five minutes or it will kill the engine.
If you want you can leave the manual transmission in neutral and drive for miles before it starts to slip.
You can burn your differential up, because the 90wt has wrapped around the spider gears like caramel.
Adding a pint of ATF takes 15min because it is almost as thick as tooth paste.
30wt diesel oil is identical to barely warm road tar.
You put cardboard in front of your radiator to bring the engine temp into the operating range and the heater being turned on drops it to the cold mark.
Vinyl seat covers crunch like potato chips.
Nothing but trouble.

SquirmyPug
12-22-2013, 05:46 PM
A few times a year I have to scrape ice off my windshield.. I use a clear 2X4 welding lens.. My a$$ gets cold from the seat.. Guess that's about it for me, hope it never gets as cold here as it does there :)

70Challenger
12-22-2013, 06:39 PM
Allowing your engine to warm up to operating temperature before you drive will not kill it. Nothing wrong with some warm up time, as it runs most efficiently at its operating temperature.

drujinin
12-22-2013, 06:43 PM
Modern engines have Thermostats to HELP keep the engine warm!
Modern engines also heat up faster to minimize Emissions!

denrep
12-22-2013, 06:53 PM
. . .If you want you can leave the manual transmission in neutral and drive for miles before it starts to slip.
:)


---------

Of course a running engine warms and recirculates fuel.
So a good way to not invite cold weather fuel problems is to not drive off into the sunrise with a cold engine.

Blackbeard
12-22-2013, 07:05 PM
A few times a year I have to scrape ice off my windshield.. I use a clear 2X4 welding lens.. My a$$ gets cold from the seat.. Guess that's about it for me, hope it never gets as cold here as it does there :)

My dad use to keep an old clear lense in his truck too!!

handtpipeline
12-23-2013, 02:15 AM
We don't have near the cold here that a lot of ya'll have. about -10f is the coldest I've seen here, and usually 5 to 10f is the lowest. But if it's below freezing, I plug my '96 Cummins in. It's real cold natured since I turned the pump up. Even with it plugged in, if you don't give it just a bit of fuel it'll die for the first 10 seconds or so. You don't have to rev it up, just help it a bit. After I start it, I'll put the transfer case in neutral and the transmission in 5th to let it warm up. Just makes it shift a lot easier when I do finally take off. My '99 has always started fine without plugging it in, but if it's extremely cold I plug it in anyway mainly so the heater will start sooner. I also do the transmission warm up trick on it. I learned that with my '80 model Mack, I'd put the main transmission in 5th, and the auxillary in neutral to warm the oil up. Otherwise, the shifters were so stiff for the first 20 miles or so that you wondered if you were about to break something.

handtpipeline
12-23-2013, 02:19 AM
On the 7.3 engine thing, we have a 2000 model F350 with the 7.3 engine. I've been told that the high pressure pump gets it's oil from the regular engine oil in the motor, but on this one it will get real weak and sluggish. When it does that, there is an allen plug on the high pressure pump, take it out and fill the pump up with oil and it runs great again until it gets low... Nobody has been able to explain to us how it's supposed to get oil from the motor, but you can add oil there and it runs great...

dellwas
12-23-2013, 07:13 AM
That's what I do with my '97. When the truck is working. Got no fuel to the bowl, suspect the mechanical pump is shot. I'll fix it some year.


I have a stock engine coolant heater that I use when it gets to 20 degrees or below..
It's on a timer that starts at midnight and shuts off @ 8 AM...

INVALUABLE in the cold.


...zap!

dellwas
12-23-2013, 07:18 AM
Here you go, hope this helps...

http://www.powerstroke.org/forum/bio-diesel-alternative-fuels-supplements/114042-how-heui-works-best-convert.html


On the 7.3 engine thing, we have a 2000 model F350 with the 7.3 engine. I've been told that the high pressure pump gets it's oil from the regular engine oil in the motor, but on this one it will get real weak and sluggish. When it does that, there is an allen plug on the high pressure pump, take it out and fill the pump up with oil and it runs great again until it gets low... Nobody has been able to explain to us how it's supposed to get oil from the motor, but you can add oil there and it runs great...

bigb
12-23-2013, 08:42 AM
On the 7.3 engine thing, we have a 2000 model F350 with the 7.3 engine. I've been told that the high pressure pump gets it's oil from the regular engine oil in the motor, but on this one it will get real weak and sluggish. When it does that, there is an allen plug on the high pressure pump, take it out and fill the pump up with oil and it runs great again until it gets low... Nobody has been able to explain to us how it's supposed to get oil from the motor, but you can add oil there and it runs great...

The hpop reservoir you are referring to gets filled by the lpop (your engine's regular oil pump). While the engine is running that oil in the reservoir gets changed over many times per hour. Topping it off may help with a no start issue if it leaks down past the check while parked, but really won't help anything long term as that is less than a minutes supply of oil in there for the injectors.

BlueArc
12-23-2013, 12:34 PM
I have the block heater for my 7.3 on a timer. The coldest I've had to start it in is 10F. Turned over like it was a warm summer day.
But I think it's insane to cold start a diesel and drive off if you don't need to. How that can be argued I just don't know.

And as for you guys up north with the -30, -40, etc problems. Holy crap.

zapster
12-23-2013, 01:30 PM
I have the block heater for my 7.3 on a timer. The coldest I've had to start it in is 10F. Turned over like it was a warm summer day.
But I think it's insane to cold start a diesel and drive off if you don't need to. How that can be argued I just don't know.

And as for you guys up north with the -30, -40, etc problems. Holy crap.



Last Tuesday AM it was 8 BELOW zero here and yesterday it was 65...
I have been up north on my sled when it was 30 below without the wind!

...zap!

weldermike
12-23-2013, 01:36 PM
Zap i broke my butt plowing out the property this weekend and by sunday it was completly melted. Today 13deg and snowing. The world has gone mad. 60deg differance overnight.

ezduzit
12-23-2013, 02:47 PM
In my early teens I worked running heavy equipment. The accountant at the construction company used the oil pressure gauge in his car the same way he used the fuel gauge. When it got close to zero oil pressure, he added oil. How would you like to buy a car from someone like that.

OP--Don't be that guy. :)

Canadian Welding
12-23-2013, 02:48 PM
There is no value in letting an engine idle for that length of time. It actually is a waste.

I always let my cars and trucks warm up in the winter. It not only clears the windows, mirrors, and seats, but revving (driving) a diesel engine when its very cold is a big no no. It is never a waste, in the winter here.

12345678910
12-23-2013, 04:45 PM
I wish I had heated mirrors and heated windsheild washer juice

Of the three nozzles, two are always frozen


There were commercial units for heated ww fluid, but they burned some cars and recalled them


has anyone ever rigged active or passive ww fluid heat ?

M J D
12-23-2013, 08:19 PM
I remember back with the older diesels guys would hook up quick couplers in the heater hoses and then a set on their pickup truck, then you would join the vehicles together and let the truck hooked to it for 15-20 minutes before starting. Kind of like an anti-freeze transfusion.

RaptorDuner
12-24-2013, 12:14 AM
I wish I had heated mirrors and heated windsheild washer juice

Of the three nozzles, two are always frozen


There were commercial units for heated ww fluid, but they burned some cars and recalled them


There is an aftermarket replacement that doesn't have the issue. This year it has got down to 6 degrees this year but with the remote start on my Duramax, I don't have any issues. :D

12345678910
12-24-2013, 03:09 PM
There is an aftermarket replacement that doesn't have the issue. This year it has got down to 6 degrees this year but with the remote start on my Duramax, I don't have any issues. :D

Can you let me know what brand or model ?

RaptorDuner
12-24-2013, 03:16 PM
GM Heated Washer Fluid Replacement (http://www.alphathermusa.com/heatedwash-AT-37GM.html)

I haven't switched to it yet but several people love it at DieselPlace.com

Dualie
12-25-2013, 12:51 AM
i think all these cold temps are gods way of telling you to move. BRRRRRRRRRR i got a chill just reading some of them

Mondo
12-25-2013, 07:27 AM
Really? I always thought it was better to let it warm up and take the loss in gas vs the maintenance/repair of not letting a car warm up.

Provided it's a bigger engine, etc.
I recall Volvo saying this way back during the Oil Embargo of the 1970's:
With modern multi-viscosity oils once the oil pressure is up the engine will warm faster and consume less fuel if driven with a light load. That doesn't mean jack-rabbit starts and zooming up to 80 MPH right out of the driveway.

But diesels are different... Especially big ones. They need to warm to operating temperature before driving away.

Now about that dipstick: Dipsticks don't work unless the dipstick with the ignition key uses it. I check my gas engine about every second or third tank of gas - maybe. Diesels I drive: I check every day before starting.

Mondo
12-25-2013, 07:31 AM
I have a stock engine coolant heater that I use when it gets to 20 degrees or below..
It's on a timer that starts at midnight and shuts off @ 8 AM...

INVALUABLE in the cold.


...zap!

You figure that by 8 o'clock either the outside temp is warm enough or you just aren't leaving the house that day?

swampwelder13
12-25-2013, 08:09 AM
I live in central Florida. We're lucky to see 40 come winter. but i still get to the farm 30 min before the crew arrives to start equipment. Cause if I don't do it all that happens is. Turning over (with no glow plugs of course) and when it finally starts it goes straight to max rpms

Sent from my C771 using Tapatalk 2

mikecwik
12-25-2013, 08:29 AM
I live in central Florida. We're lucky to see 40 come winter. but i still get to the farm 30 min before the crew arrives to start equipment. Cause if I don't do it all that happens is. Turning over (with no glow plugs of course) and when it finally starts it goes straight to max rpms

Sent from my C771 using Tapatalk 2

Both of those conditions make me cringe.

swampwelder13
12-25-2013, 08:43 AM
And I'm the bad one when I get onto them about that

Sent from my C771 using Tapatalk 2

turk
12-25-2013, 09:00 AM
I never had a problem in cold weather before with a diesel other than getting one started. Its kind of crazy Fords automatic transmissions don't like the cold. Progress always isnt I suppose.

I would not hop in a vehicle and tear off if the temperature was 90f. A cold seizure in a modern engine or an old one can't be blamed on the cold if in fact that is what happened.

You're killing your engine letting it idle it is even worse on a diesel than a gasser. ...

You clearly have no idea what you are talking about. I drive an 02 excursion with a 7.3 and it sounds like a bucket of bolts in the back of a four wheeler if it is under 10F and I don't let it warm up idling. And like one of the other guys said it is a danger to yourself and other drivers to drive around without defrost.

Meltedmetal
12-25-2013, 09:44 AM
Many jurisdictions throughout the US and Canada have anti-idling laws which can lead to a fine for idling more than three minutes(environmental regs) although I have never known anyone who was ticketed. My 1975 backhoe's manual suggests not to let it idle more than a few minutes at under 1000 rpm's even when warm as it will blow fuel into the engine oil at low rpm so they suggest to either work it or shut it off. For start up they suggest 2/3 throttle for 5 minutes and then reduced load for 1/2 an hour. Anybody read their manual to see what they suggest?---Meltedmetal

mikecwik
12-26-2013, 09:10 AM
Ok, I admit I have no idea what I am talking about.

What was I talking about? I forgot what I was talking bout.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rPxXfL2kmfg

I hate rappers and rednecks in no order of merit

zapster
12-26-2013, 03:40 PM
You figure that by 8 o'clock either the outside temp is warm enough or you just aren't leaving the house that day?

If I stay home I still go out and get my newspaper by 8 AM....
Sat..Sun it don't matter.

If it's gonna be below 15 or so even after I get to the shop I plug it in..
10 hrs in the cold is 10 hrs in the cold.
Day..night it don't matter...

...zap!

Burpee
12-26-2013, 03:46 PM
Ford and Harley use the same dipsticks. You put a Sunday paper under each of the oil seals and when they're no longer readable, add another gallon.