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blownnova
11-02-2005, 11:55 PM
Just curious what kinda older machines some of you guys on here might be still using today? My buddy just sold a millermatic 35(not positive on the model) that he bought 18 years ago at auction for 500 bux he said. It was pretty well used when he bought it then too. He got 500 out of it when he sold it too lol....pretty good investment. I know the millermatic 200's are supposed to be great machines to get used if you can find em.

gnewby
11-03-2005, 12:10 AM
I have got an old Forney Stick welder that I still use I think it was made back in the 1960's it still works great.

stick
11-05-2005, 02:15 PM
I have an old Forney stick welder too. I imagine it would date back to the 50's or very early 60's. Old enough to still have jacks for carbon arc , brazing and battery charging.

KEENAVV
11-05-2005, 03:48 PM
My stick welder is a Hobart T180 I got from my dad. I have tried to get info on it without success.

gnewby
11-05-2005, 04:43 PM
My old Forney Welder:)

KEENAVV
11-05-2005, 04:54 PM
can't get pic

KEENAVV
11-05-2005, 06:33 PM
last try-- INVALED POST AGAIN

oldebrush
11-05-2005, 07:32 PM
I still use a MM35, (with the spot timer and stitch timer controls) and a Miller "Square case" AC/DC Thunderbolt, and a Miller Roughneck 2e AC engine driven portable machine. These are all from the 80's and earlier. Not really sure of their actual ages but I have owned the Thunderbolt and Roughneck for at least 12 years and I got them both used. The MM35 was from military auction so that was really used, but like new. I've had that for about 4 years.

Tony

customweld
11-05-2005, 08:58 PM
:waving: ive got a miller matic 200 and still weld 045 spray with it. late 60s early 70s.

motor mount
11-06-2005, 08:50 PM
My last mig welder was a systematics 150 with spot timer. Not nearly as old as that old buz box.

weldbyear
11-07-2005, 09:04 AM
I bought this welder ( Hobart G-213) about 25 years ago, and at that time it was well used. It has proven to be a great investment over the years. So far the only thing I’ve had to do to it mechanically is when I first got it was to change the wires, cap and rotor, since then change the oil and breakdown the carb once after it had sat a while unused. I’ve used in a pinch as a generator for our house power after a couple of severe storms. The only problem I have with it, is the lower end (0-3.5 or so) of the fine adjustment, on all settings will only cause minor sparking but no arc. So it’s a little temperamental it that respect.

2532

2533

quickgun
11-10-2005, 10:14 PM
Istill have my Miller Big 20 gas powered welder I bought new in 1977. It has a Continental Red Seal engine. I now have 2 newer diesel powered units, but the old Miller still works ok. No telling how many thousand hours it has between myself and helpers.

boogerweldz
11-11-2005, 02:23 AM
I have a century model 1941A Arc welder I dont know how old it is I have been trying to research it but I am pretty sure its alot older than me I will snap some pics tomorrow of it

Greg

BigEd36
12-24-2005, 05:21 PM
I have a Lincoln "tombstone" 180 amp unit that I bought in either late '68 or early '69, I bought it before I got drafted in April '69, never got to use it til after I got out in April '71. It's still going strong.

Ed

Comp Chassis
12-24-2005, 05:44 PM
I have a Millermatic 200 I bought used in I believe 1988. Serial number says it was built in 1979. It was used sporadically until 1991 when I started a race car fabrication business and it has been used daily since. I run probably 4-5 35 lbs spools of .030 wire through it a year and have burned up 4 guns over the years. Machine is still going strong with the only repairs being a main power switch, an amp selector switch, a contactor and a set of capacitors. If I could find another machine in decent condition for sale I wouldnt hesitate to buy one.

lotechman
12-26-2005, 05:55 PM
Weldbyear: I have one of those units:')) I fire it up about once a year. That old wisconsin engine is dead reliable. Most of the labelling is gone on mine and I am sure if it dies I will not find parts for the generator section. I did find a new fuel pump diaphram for it several years ago. It sits under a tarp in my back yard. It deserves better treatment.

smithboy
12-26-2005, 08:59 PM
I have a neighbor that has one of those old hobarts also. It runs like a top. He uses it as a generator for his construction business. He said he paid $400 for it a few years back...he said he has probably run 10 times that through it in fuel. I think his is a Wisconsin 2cyl also.

TxRedneck
12-26-2005, 11:46 PM
Im tryin to get a deal on an older (60's-70's vintage) sa 200 from a guy on here. Im hoping I can come up with the money but Im uncle peg leg for the time being till I get this leg healed up. OUtta work till then too:realmad: Oh well What ya gonna do Ive used an old hobart. Dont know the age...looked like a lincoln classic though. And I had an older than the hills lincoln ac/dc 225 but sold it to a friend cause I needed money and he needed a welder to suit his retirement hobbies. I used an old forney with the plug in taps. Ive also used old lincoln and miller tig welders that that HF burned out and we used em for stick machines. Massive machines. A friend of mine had pics he circulated of an old machine guess he used to use in a shop.- Its basically the "welder" part of an SA 200 only instead of being powered off an old continental, its powered off an AC motor. Pretty cool stuff. Anyway...old machines could be good. New machiens can be good. Some things are better of the new...sometimes arent. I guess it depends on what your looking for.

d38710
12-27-2005, 09:22 AM
In my intro to fabrication class, we have Miller stick units from the late 60's. Our instructor said that they are actually easier to use and more reliable then some of Miller's new models.

TxRedneck
12-27-2005, 12:40 PM
In my intro to fabrication class, we have Miller stick units from the late 60's. Our instructor said that they are actually easier to use and more reliable then some of Miller's new models.
well cub hes right. atleast imo. the newer ones, many are going to inveter. Inverter has lots of advantages. Weight, overal size. Miller claims the overall cost of repairs is also cheaper, atleast in the longrun. But the transformer and generator type machines were dynamite. They were almost bullet proof. The inner workings atleast. Im sure Mr Lotech can tell some stories, like others of these machines falling, geting dumped hard, stuff falling on them..ect. Yet they still worked just fine. They took dirty dusty bumpy road conditions. The new inverters....computers basicaly, well lets just say the engineers havent yet mastered the concept of making these machines bullet proof...which for many in the field they need to be. Even in the shop though, life is tough on these machines. Ive seen coffee spilt on em. The older ones Ive seem em run wihtout a hikup. The newer ones just died. inverters are awesome when they run. They can be cloned to run like a generator like an sa 200. I betcha my last dollar someone like JKING or another pipeliner would notice the differnce, but for the average welder it wouldnt be big deal. course something like less than half the weight makes a big differnce. also the inverterrs allow the use of AC/DC capabilities. SA200 was pure dc...all the way to its aux output. In its day you had similar machiens with ac output, still do I guess. But these were quite as fine and precise as the all DC machine was. Welp, Ive talked too much. Y'all have a good one
:waving:

gimpyrobb
12-27-2005, 03:19 PM
I have an old K.O.Lee that they stopped making in 1959. I picked it up for 20.00, tested it out, and decided to keep it. I have only replaced the leads on it and it works great. The company sent me an exploded parts view and some advert. pages. It looks like R2D2!

riley mcmillan
01-03-2006, 04:23 PM
Just curious what kinda older machines some of you guys on here might be still using today? My buddy just sold a millermatic 35(not positive on the model) that he bought 18 years ago at auction for 500 bux he said. It was pretty well used when he bought it then too. He got 500 out of it when he sold it too lol....pretty good investment. I know the millermatic 200's are supposed to be great machines to get used if you can find em.



I have a miller 330 a b/p set up for tig. Bought it new in 1972. Wonderful machine. The square waves are an improvement because of adjusting for penetration on thicker aluminum instead of having to use helium and dcne.

B2N3 Welder
01-03-2006, 08:54 PM
My oldest is a lincoln torpedo welder 1973 model runs awesome i'll have to get some scrap and take pic of what it will do

Al_V
01-07-2006, 03:38 PM
I have a 1953 DC-250-AS Lincwelder powered by a hand crank start, air cooled Wisconsin engine. When I bought it, I was told it "welds great, but can't start it, no spark at the magneto." Well, I checked, and it DID have spark, but the fuel line and fuel tank was full of rust. I fixed that and got it running in a couple hours, but no juice. The brushes were not perfect, but not so bad to output nothing. So I opened up the welder side for an exploratory, and found that the range selector switch had grounded out. Most of the old plastic or bakelite was falling apart, so I made new plastic insulators, put it back together, and it now works excellent!

http://us.f1.yahoofs.com/bc/54e819b1_L40491b6b/bc/public/Lincwelder/welder1.jpg?BC8zBwDBNhXDlBtr
http://us.f1.yahoofs.com/bc/54e819b1_L40491b6b/bc/public/Lincwelder/welder2.jpg?BC8zBwDBPAPJz83l
http://us.f1.yahoofs.com/bc/54e819b1_L40491b6b/bc/public/Lincwelder/welder3.jpg?BC8zBwDBEhtxC.8n

TxRedneck
01-07-2006, 04:11 PM
b2n3, youre torpedo is the sa 200 gen powered by an ac elec motor right?

BBchevy396
01-07-2006, 11:17 PM
I've got an old, early 50's ??? Lincoln "weldandpower" 200amp ac welder, with a hand-crank 2cyl. wisconson eng.
Still works good, I start it every once and a while,
He he he, When someone wants to borrow my portable welder, I load it up for them, he he he.

TxRedneck
01-08-2006, 01:35 AM
lol those are nifty lil welders. I dont care for the ac, but heck there still nifty. a friend of mine his dad used to or maybe still does have one. He said he hated that thing cause dad pulled the knob off so the boys would have to learn to weld without adjusting the amps every other rod lmao

Steelwill
01-08-2006, 08:29 PM
I have a Miller Roughneck 1e which I think it was built around late 60s early 70s and it works like a charm

Steelwill
01-09-2006, 12:19 AM
Heres A picture I had it in my chevy astro for a while to practice stick welding because all I have ever used was a mig.

TxRedneck
01-09-2006, 12:23 AM
Will you ran it in the back of the van? or you just transport it back there???

Steelwill
01-09-2006, 12:27 AM
I ran it right in the van the exhaust comes out the front you can see in the pictures the person I got it from rerouted the exhaust. I opened the vent windows and the back door and fired it up.

TxRedneck
01-09-2006, 12:34 AM
oh awesome good to know i thought ive seen it but done but one never knows

Steelwill
01-09-2006, 12:39 AM
I have since pulled it out for the winter and am thinking about building a cart to move it around because that thing is heavy.

B2N3 Welder
01-10-2006, 08:16 PM
b2n3, youre torpedo is the sa 200 gen powered by an ac elec motor right? Yes it sure is TxRedneck you have used them be then? sure is one heck of a machine

TxRedneck
01-10-2006, 08:36 PM
no a friend of mine has Ive only used sa 200 and i think the torpedos are pretty good :D

bruland
01-30-2006, 03:18 PM
I have Smith's from the 40's ? It's a big round unit that tops out at 250 amps

SMITH'S WELDING EQUIP CORP
MINNEAPOLIS MINN.
25-18
SER 25-18154

It's a gess at the age of the great welder. Any body know anything about it?

bruland

mgv8news
02-01-2006, 08:49 AM
I have a Miller SRTA-2SP TIG machine in the shop now. According to Miller it was manufactured in 1956. It works great except for a problem with the hi-frequency which I am working on now.

Snidley
02-01-2006, 02:12 PM
I currently am using a 1973 Miller big 40 unit. Runs great and still cranks up to 400 amps - 100% duty up to 300 so I can get the job done when times an issue.

oldebrush
02-01-2006, 07:00 PM
Will,

That machine brings back memories. I had one too, but someone thought they needed it more than me and stole it out of my garage. Had it hanging up on my electric hoist too. Ahh, that was long ago and another someone thought I was a good guy and nearly gave me a Roughneck 2e for doing some work for him. He even through in a Lincoln LN-25 suitcase feeder too. Hell of a nice guy, don't ya think?

Tony

oldebrush
02-01-2006, 07:03 PM
Will,

The nice guy actually did give me the welder, (not just "nearly") I was a happy camper.

Tony

Steelwill
02-01-2006, 08:19 PM
Hey Oldebrush glad to be able to bring back some good memories. I had never stick welded before and wanted to learn so I picked it up from a friend
who had it laying in his garage. After cleaning the carb a new battery and fresh gas that thing was running. For a old machine it works well.

awright
02-16-2006, 04:18 PM
I'm very happy with my WWII era Air Force surplus "P&H AC ARC WELDER MODEL TSP-350-HF-GW," transformer-type stick/TIG welder. It's equipped with HF and Gas/Water valves, but I'm embarrassed to say I have never set it up for TIG. But I have intended to and have everything I need except initiative! I'm only slightly motivated to set up for aluminum welding, anyway.

I'm not sure of the vintage, but the instruction plate has a part number 232F52, which makes me think it was built around 1952. I used to have an instruction manual that gave a similar vintage, but lost track of it during an office move.

Had to rewire my home for 200 amp service and my garage for 90 amps to the welder (even though I have never used full 450 amp output). What a revelation it was to get that welder at a military surplus auction about 40 years ago and find out that I really could weld (to my satisfaction, at least) and that all my problems striking and holding an arc were due to the even older, second-hand CRAFTSMAN buzz box with three pluggable current settings that I was trying to learn on. (Still have that too. I can't ever throw anything away.)

By chance, does anybody have any info on foot controls for this type of welder? The main front-panel current control is a saturable reactor controlled by a 6.8 ohm, 150 watt or so variable resistor, all three terminals of which are used. I think that type of variable resistor is what I would need in a foot control, which doesn't seem mechanically practical due to very high friction of that size pot. Anybody have experience with such an arrangement?

awright

zapster
02-18-2006, 10:59 AM
we have a linclon idealarc 300 amp stick welder we use everyday

it was installed in april of 1955:confused: or somewhere around there

and to this day it has never seen "maintenence"

lets see a new welder last this long:laugh:

...zap!

RobertDoubrava
02-23-2006, 11:22 PM
Most of y'all probably know about it and are tired of me talking about it but OH WELL........I have a 1947 Lincoln SAE300 DC arc welder, it's all original, except the air cleaner for the Hercules JXD engine is missing. Had to buy a used one from a guy in Idaho. I run it almost every day, it sure likes the taste of gas though! :dizzy:

kd5inm
12-07-2007, 07:16 PM
Hi all,
I've read the messages on the oldest welder and I think I've got all of you beat. I have a Lincoln SA-200 with a Hercules IXB5 engine in it. The casting date on the engine is 11-27-1939, so that makes this welder about a 1939-1940 model. This welder is so old that there is NO CODE number on the machine. Getting parts for these is next to impossible. I did manage to get a IM-109 manual (copy) from Lincoln, they were great to send it to me. Everything is original except for the water pump which is a water pump from a mazda RX-7 that I grafted on it and drive it from a belt drive on the shaft that fed power to the other water pump and the magneto.
I rebuilt the engine some years ago, new fel-pro gasket set, rings and rod/main bearings and oil pump from a parts machine (I had three of these welders at one time, this one is the oldest).
I have some pictures which I will upload when I can figure out how to reduce their file size.
Last time I fired her up she ran great and welded even better, I had replaced the brushes in the generator and you wouldn't believe the improvement.
John

TozziWelding
12-07-2007, 07:20 PM
I had a 1970 SA-200, sold that now I have a 75' as well as a 1980's vintage SA-250 I rescued from the scrap heap. My new Trailblazer is a tin toy next to the old iron.

kd5inm
12-07-2007, 10:53 PM
Here's some pictures, I've got a few more I'll post
John


Hi all,
I've read the messages on the oldest welder and I think I've got all of you beat. I have a Lincoln SA-200 with a Hercules IXB5 engine in it. The casting date on the engine is 11-27-1939, so that makes this welder about a 1939-1940 model. This welder is so old that there is NO CODE number on the machine. Getting parts for these is next to impossible. I did manage to get a IM-109 manual (copy) from Lincoln, they were great to send it to me. Everything is original except for the water pump which is a water pump from a mazda RX-7 that I grafted on it and drive it from a belt drive on the shaft that fed power to the other water pump and the magneto.
I rebuilt the engine some years ago, new fel-pro gasket set, rings and rod/main bearings and oil pump from a parts machine (I had three of these welders at one time, this one is the oldest).
I have some pictures which I will upload when I can figure out how to reduce their file size.
Last time I fired her up she ran great and welded even better, I had replaced the brushes in the generator and you wouldn't believe the improvement.
John

kd5inm
12-07-2007, 11:10 PM
Here's some more pics of my antique Lincoln SA-200.
John

kd5inm
12-07-2007, 11:33 PM
Here is a few more showing some details of the grafted on water pump and other parts. The oil filter is the original, I can still get the paper cartridge filters for it made by WIX. You can also see a picture of the date of casting of the engine block with it's number in one picture, it says 11-27-39 which I looked the info up trying to find info out about the welder and that number is the casting date of the engine block. You can also see the intake/exhaust manifold that says Hercules on it along with the firing order. In one picture you can see the radiator and the crank handle. This machine will crank start relatively easy. If you look the starter isn't even hooked up to a battery. I've never had problems crank starting this baby!
John

shortarc
12-08-2007, 02:02 AM
This is an old one we have at a farm shop, have no idea how old it is, cant find online info by using the name off of the tag on the front. The name on the tag is "Holup" thing weighs about 300 lbs. and welds well.

sonofjabba
12-08-2007, 11:24 PM
I sold my 1960ish Craftsman to a guy a year ago. It worked okay.. Once in a while you had to smack it to get the fan going but it still made beads.

Still have a pic of it on my PC Model was a 113.20155 113 decodes as supplied by Emerson Electric?
http://i215.photobucket.com/albums/cc200/sonofjabba/welder01.jpg

tanky321
12-09-2007, 01:08 AM
Heres an old miller I found in some old mill. I think its from the 50's, thats the best guess I could get off the tag.

http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f267/tanky321/Jan18_0001.jpg

sonofjabba
12-09-2007, 01:20 AM
A lot of these old welders are bullet-proof. Electrically & physically. Give you a herniated disk in you back trying to move too.

I had two Lincoln arc welders as it was. I hated to see it go, but it was time.

http://i215.photobucket.com/albums/cc200/sonofjabba/smilie_schweissen.gif

Garfield43
04-30-2008, 10:13 AM
just added this to the fleet
http://www.lazyj.us/1welder.jpg
http://www.lazyj.us/2welder.jpg

Got it at a garage sale for 50 bucks. I haven't wired up an outlet for it yet. I found a manual at Lincoln's page for a AC180K welder from 1969. This one looks just like it but it is a 'C'. I assume it is older.

Oldtimer
04-30-2008, 02:31 PM
I used my middle '60s Powercraft crackerbox and Powercraft DC converter this weekend to build a ballast tank for the rear of my new Kubota tractor. It is a good old machine. I was told when I bought it that it was built by Lincoln.

Hammack_Welding
04-30-2008, 08:59 PM
I've got a couple old lincoln idealarcs from the early fifties that still gets used frequently, and a miller dialarc from the 1970's I was told. I also have an old Lilliston 180 amp AC portable that was made by lincoln back in the sixties that will get drug out from time to time.

snoeproe
04-30-2008, 11:38 PM
i have a Viking 200 amp DC arc welder by Erickson and Erickson. This is a WW2 era machine that was bought at a US military auction many years ago. It's a transformer machine thats submerged in a oil bath to achieve 100% duty cycle.

Jolly Roger
05-03-2008, 11:05 PM
I have a really old Lincoln ac 225 (the bright red paint is more like dreamsickle orange), no date to be found on it that I use on occasion. I used a huge Lincoln in 1980 that was built during the depression. They are still using it on a daily basis.

denrep
05-05-2008, 07:40 AM
19368

Pulled 05/2008 :realmad: "I'll be back!"
19369
Should we at least throw a semi-retirement party?? :drinkup: :)

Jim Stabe
05-05-2008, 12:01 PM
Technically I'm not using it anymore but last year I sold my Lincoln tombstone that I bought used (well used) in 1959. It served well over the years and I think the new owner is still sticking metal together with it.

Jim

gnm109
05-05-2008, 02:35 PM
I've got an AC Trindl 90 Amp Buzzbox that my Dad and I used some 50 years ago (ca.1958) when we were building flourescent pole lamps. (Yes, he actually had a patent!). We used it with a Lincoln dual carbon arc torch for low cost brazing to connect ends for the lamp tubing. It really worked perfectly for that process. I still have the machine and it still works perfectly. It's basically a nice heavy gauge steel case about 18" cube with two cables. It's got a big fat transformer with several taps coming out of it.

It has 6 sockets on the front: ABC for the range and 123 for fine tuning within the range. There is data on the front that shows the value of each range. Last year, I disassembled it, the Lincoln torch and the original welding hood that we used in the 1950's and cleaned the welder, repainted it and bead-blasted the hood and torch so they look almost like new. It's on one of my benches with the hood and torch and everytime I see those items, I think of my Dad.

Trindl is, of course, no longer in business, but they made a good little buzzbox. By the way, if you have a lot of brazing to do on sheet metal, it's pretty hard to beat one of those Lincoln arc torches for low cost. They are still made today with no changes.

Sorry I don't have a picture due to the untimely death of my Nikon Digital but I'm due to get another one in the near future so I'll start posting pictures again.
:)

BradIXXI
08-18-2008, 02:10 PM
I've been using a 1947 Lincoln SA-200 for the last year and it runs like a champ. After I finish the hanger doors at the airport I plan on getting her back to "like new" condition. I owe her that after everything I've put her through, and she never let me down or complained once.
http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb26/StealthString/Welder-008.jpg
http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb26/StealthString/Welder-004.jpg

rmkrider1
08-18-2008, 07:42 PM
I like those old lincoln Sa 200's
Here's mine.

makoman1860
08-18-2008, 10:57 PM
Well its not an electric macine, but my oldest working torch, that I use regularly is a Smith #2 from 1933. Its a work of art compared to whats made now.

dmd3058
08-19-2008, 05:33 PM
just picked this welder up on monday was told its a Viking 220 Volt Stick welder. never heard of viking before but couldnt pass it up for $50 Anyone ever see this model before?

mudbugone
08-24-2008, 09:42 PM
Well I finally got my old welder back that I sold 16 years ago to a friend that never paid for it. It was operational when he got it,but he took the leads off and made them fit his welder and took the plug off for some reason.

It has a wooden chassis that was covered with plywood to make a case. I took all the non-original cabinet work off today to clean out the entire unit.

The ID plate says---

Omaha Electric Arc Welder
110 220V-AC-60CY-1 PH
power demand-7-1/2 KVA
Sec. Amps 50-150
Electric Welder Corporation
Omaha,Nebraska

I was looking forward to hooking it back up to play with,but since all the leads & plug have been removed I'm not sure how to reattach the leads or plug for correct function.

I should explain... The top is made out of something like black micarta(sp) to insulate the brass lever switch which has a lead lug attachment bolt and can be rotated to one of 4 switch blade slots marked 50-100-125-150 .At the other end of the top are 3 brass switch blade slots marked 1-2-3 but no blade....It's been 16 years since I messed with this thing and that was only a little after I got it.

I think one of the leads attached to the brass lever switch with the 50-100-125-150 amp slots and some sort of blade attachment was attached to the other lead & plugged into one of the 1-2-3 blade slots.... I just don't remember which was + or -- and I'm pretty sure the goof I turned it over to won't remember what he pulled off the machine.

It's the oldest welder I ever saw and I'd like to get it back operational if I can....It's a shame really because it was very smooth. It weighs probably 300-400# at least and has 3 large coils--2 verticle ones at each end and a very large one between them laying flat accross the bottom. This thing resembles something you'd see in an old Frankenstein movie as part of the electrical works.

I tried to describe it as best I could in hopes someone reading this thread might have some insight about how to hook it back up or best case might know where to find information on the Electric Welder Corp.

This isn't really for serious work ...I'd just like to restore it to keep around the shop as a functional conversation piece,although I know it welds great up to 150A.

I'll have to take some pictures of it to better explain it's workings. Any thoughts about it would be appreciated at this point....now that I cleaned the acorn shells out of the top...Thank God whatever placed them there didn't get into windings or internals.

mudbugone
08-26-2008, 08:23 PM
Pictures of Omaha welder.
http://i228.photobucket.com/albums/ee117/mudbugone/omahaarcwelder.jpg

http://i228.photobucket.com/albums/ee117/mudbugone/omahaarcwelder4.jpg

http://i228.photobucket.com/albums/ee117/mudbugone/omahaarcwelder5.jpg

http://i228.photobucket.com/albums/ee117/mudbugone/omahaarcwelder3.jpg

http://i228.photobucket.com/albums/ee117/mudbugone/omahaarcwelder2.jpg

OK boys! Do I win the oldest welder prize?

denrep
08-26-2008, 09:29 PM
Well I finally got my old welder back ...

Omaha Electric Arc Welder
110 220V-AC-60CY-1 PH
power demand-7-1/2 KVA
Sec. Amps 50-150
Electric Welder Corporation
Omaha,Nebraska

I was looking forward to hooking it back up to play with,but since all the leads & plug have been removed I'm not sure how to reattach the leads or plug for correct function.

I should explain... The top is made out of something like black micarta(sp) to insulate the brass lever switch which has a lead lug attachment bolt and can be rotated to one of 4 switch blade slots marked 50-100-125-150 .At the other end of the top are 3 brass switch blade slots marked 1-2-3 but no blade....

Mudbugone,

I'm sure it's AC only, so the output lead polarity connection wouldn't matter.
Output probably connects with basic range on the knife control, and the fine adjustments of Low, Medium, High, on the 123 studs.

Input is probably two hot leads only, it may not have a ground connection; again, polarity wouldn't be an issue. Since the plate lists 110/220 input, there is probably a low/high input voltage jumper somewhere.

I like the open controls; that's one way to discourage stacking of tools on top of the welder! :laugh:

That is a dandy. Yup, I think the oldest welder prize will be yours. :drinkup:

Good Luck

mudbugone
08-26-2008, 10:34 PM
If you look at the very last picture link (arc welder 2) You can see the three wires into the machine --the left one is green--the right one is black--and the white one loops down to a ground bolt on the metal rolling chassis. The two wires(G & B) attached to the coils are both hot I guess?

I'm thinking the electrode lead attaches to the blade control and the ground lead attaches to one of the 3 slots numbered 1-2-3.... or perhaps it's the other way around. Can't believe they aren't marked in some manner. I'm thinking about making a blade type insulated plug out of copper of some design that can be pushed into/onto the 1-2-3 slots with a bolt attachment to accept a standard cable lug with a bolt hole in it like the one that fits the other attachment bolt.

I asked an 80+ year old weldor about it today and showed him a picture of it....he didn't remember seeing such a machine even when he was younger.

I'm going to concentrate on cleaning it up right now and don't intend to plug it in until I'm more sure of doing it correctly.... It's been around a long time....I'd hate to burn it up that way.

I guess I never thought about exactly how old it might be until I started looking for information on it and couldn't find anything close to it's design anywhere. It's growing on me and I've only had it back two days.

I hope the pictures jog someones mind and I can find out more about it. Hope everyone enjoys the 5 pictures...I'll post some more as restoration progresses.

denrep
08-26-2008, 11:15 PM
...The two wires(G & B) attached to the coils are both hot I guess? I'm sure that would be correct. For wire color convention you could move the green to the frame for ground; any other colors on the studs are okay.


I'm thinking the electrode lead attaches to the blade control and the ground lead attaches to one of the 3 slots numbered 1-2-3.... or perhaps it's the other way around.
Polarity doesn't matter, it's AC (alternating current) output.
Either lead on either output will work fine.

Hook the input to some smaller fuses for your initial testing.

Let's see this baby burn!

mudbugone
08-26-2008, 11:56 PM
Hook the input to some smaller fuses for your initial testing.

Let's see this baby burn!

Funny you should mention fuses/breakers...I was pondering that earlier today.... With only 150A output and looking at the serial plate specs. --- Would a 30-40 amp breaker be enough? That's what I've got now in the shop for a 220V plasma cutter. I'll have to research a similar output older welder to determine a correct breaker combination. I tried to figure what 7 1/2 KVA ment today,but the explainations online were even more confusing than what I don't know now--LOL

I really would like to see if it still works...I've got some leads,but I'll have to attach new ends and make some connectors specific to this machine--- everyone takes one look at it and their eyes get real big and they feel it's very dangerous looking. I suppose the controls exposed like that are the reason.It was encased in a crude plywood cabinet with a raised area around the switches and a lid,but it was beat-up and offered no way to clean it up inside without removing it. I have every respect for this unit & have no intention of playing with raw fire until I have everything under control & safe.

I'm thinking about building a plexiglass case around it with angle iron corners if after it's cleaned up nobody comes up with a picture of a really old wooden cased welder to copy. It might be pretty cool to be able to see everything including those brass switch blades...the top plate should polish up with black shoe polish to a glassy ebony finish,it looks like the counters in a high school lab.

Oldiron2
08-27-2008, 12:32 AM
The ID plate says---

Omaha Electric Arc Welder
110 220V-AC-60CY-1 PH
power demand-7-1/2 KVA
Sec. Amps 50-150
Electric Welder Corporation
Omaha,Nebraska

I see you've been using the Internet to look for information about this unit. Serial number 1292? Are there any patent numbers on it? If you haven't already,you might call the major welding equipment companies to ask whether they might have any information, or leads you can follow. The City of Omaha might also have information; you might try their main library or even City Hall and ask if there is any historical department.
Did you know any of it's history when you first got it?

mudbugone
08-27-2008, 01:10 AM
I have been all over the www looking for info without success. I even tried Omaha itself without finding much at all. I checked for patents and looked into the Smithsonian a bit,but the Science & Technology Museum is closed for remodeling.

At this point I figure the company only lasted a short while since there seems to be no trail to them even on the web.The Omaha Historical Society might be the best course. I thought I'd find some info at AWS,but even their information on early years is sparse. They are setting up a welding museum,but it's in the beginning stages at this point and not a good source yet.

Considering the small amount of information online about welding history when it's such a big part of everyday life,I'm truly amazed. One point I did find interesting was the development of wire feed welding---in the late 19th century no less--- although it wasn't really developed extensively til much later in the 20th century-- surprised me.

It's become a journey into welding history and perhaps I'll find an old book or eventually track down some old patents that might supply information.

The small plate(info as supplied) I found attached to the top of the plywood enclosure, I assumed was originally attached to a cabinet/outer case of some sort,but after looking at the frame after I removed the plywood case...I'm not so sure it had a case originally. It may have been just built open framework style as the pictures show. Back when this was built...OSHA wasn't looking over shoulders. It has no other markings that I've found yet.

I'm glad others are finding this a source of interest...I'm having fun researching it and will have more fun restoring it to a functional unit...what would be the fun if the information was in the first place I looked.

denrep
08-27-2008, 01:20 AM
Funny you should mention fuses/breakers...I was pondering that earlier today...

...I tried to figure what 7 1/2 KVA meant...


7.5kva = 7500 Volts x Amps
So roughly:
220v x 34amps = 7500

That's at maximum output, so at 240volt, 30 amps of supply current would be fine for your purposes.

But when I mentioned connecting with smaller fuses I was referring to the initial tests; because you haven't metered the welder for shorts and aren't sure about connection locations.

Myself, I would probably connect test leads using just a few strands of wire for the initial test; if there was any sort of a serious overload the strands would "fuse."

mudbugone
08-27-2008, 01:45 AM
I'm actually thinking about attaching some sort of meter to read output. I'm not a super 'sparky' so I'll have to do a little research about what I need to do to determine any problems(everything looks fine). Hooking it up correctly will be the biggest variable I'm sure. All the coils are tightly wrapped with old electrical tape(very good shape) the core steel plates aren't even rusty like I thought they would be.

One thing I should add...I thought there were 3 coils ..there are actually 4 ..two vertical coils and two more very big ones running top & bottom. I don't really know the condition of the coils,but everything looks to be in perfect order with no corrosion or damage issues. I haven't cleaned the lite dust off the internal wraps yet...haven't decided what to use? Air? paint brush? rags? I don't want to use any chemicals internally. Thought about using some silicone spray after I clean up the dust...but maybe not... don't want to disturb the old cloth tape by using something that might cause it damage.Any thoughts on this issue?

While we're talking about information sources--- Does anyone live near or in Omaha that might be able to find out anything?

If I'd known how much fun this would be,I'd have brought it back to the shop years ago.I'm glad it wasn't ever paid for now.

mudbugone
10-06-2008, 10:44 PM
Pictures of Omaha welder.
http://i228.photobucket.com/albums/ee117/mudbugone/omahaarcwelder.jpg

http://i228.photobucket.com/albums/ee117/mudbugone/omahaarcwelder4.jpg

http://i228.photobucket.com/albums/ee117/mudbugone/omahaarcwelder5.jpg

http://i228.photobucket.com/albums/ee117/mudbugone/omahaarcwelder3.jpg

http://i228.photobucket.com/albums/ee117/mudbugone/omahaarcwelder2.jpg

OK boys! Do I win the oldest welder prize?


I finally got to talk to the guy that had this for 16 years to ask about hook-ups for it....

He said the ground was attached to the 4 slot blade switch and the stinger was attached to the 1-2-3 slots for high-med-low... The bad news was the original antique plug that goes on those was attached to a lead he left hanging on a fence post outside his shop. I'm going to search for it,but I don't expect to find it. It was a plug that fit those slotted stobs with the lead attached at a 90* angle. I'm thinking something turned from Delrin or some other plastic material with a brass? copper?(any thoughts) blade inserted into the side with an attachment for the lead. I'll probably make 3--so the other slots are covered too.

My email to the Smithsonian was answered with a link to the Omaha library system,but no response from them yet to the email I sent them. I was surprised the Smithsonian answered so quickly...

While I've been looking for more information I've found a very old Marquette welder,an old Airco welder,and a welder with a partial plywood case that while not as old as this one will probably follow me to the shop for kicks so I can ID the thing.

Just thought I'd update things in case anyone was interested.

denrep
10-06-2008, 11:27 PM
...Just thought I'd update things in case anyone was interested.

In case anyone was interested!? :blob2:

Glad to see you working on it.
We need a close-up of the L-M-H connector. Maybe there's a substitute available.

How about a gander at the other welders?

mudbugone
10-06-2008, 11:44 PM
I'll try to get a closeup with measurements for those connectors...but I doubt it would be anything that might be out there as a standard item. They don't resemble anything I've ever seen..just too old a design. I really hope I can find the original in his shop or in the weeds,but someone probably hauled it to the scrapper with the leads.

I just found all 3 of the mentioned welders today(along with a complete Allstate scooter--Vespa) The Marquette takes standard small lead plugs which plug into the front in different holes. The one with the partial wood case is a mystery...It takes some sort of reverse plugs(female) that plug into holes in the front for different amps & the pins inside are male pins about the size of your ring finger.

I'll be sure to post some pics after I drag them up.

I also found an old welding truck with a Hobart welder for sale in California on Ebay that was rather interesting (ebay# 300263823403) if anyone is interested or knows how to post a picture of it..very cool old welding truck.

mudbugone
11-16-2008, 09:45 PM
I took some time to finally play with this old welder,since I've not found any information on it anywhere I just started hooking wires up.

The plug was pretty simple...then I hooked up one lead to the blade switch..... I found a scrap breaker switch box with L-shaped blades to dismantle for the parts... The L- pieces fit right into the 1-2-3 slots and have a wire screw on them to attach that lead... so far so good....plugged it in and flipped the breaker...it just HUUUMMMED quietly.

Grabbed some scrap..a helmet..some 6011 rods...and proceeded to see if it made sparks.... it did.:blob1:

Set the blade switch at 100A & the other setting at 1 to see what happened with some 5/16" scrap plates.... It seemed a bit too hot...:blob4:

Next tried the 100A slot with the #3 setting---very hot:blob2:

Next tried the 50/75A slot with the #1 setting--- pretty manageable arc:blob3:

I think it will handle 1/4" plus on the lowest settings real well and obviously has enough power to do anything else on the upper settings.

I didn't get much time to play with it the first day(got interrupted right after getting it hooked up)

My Uncle and I played with it a bit the next day on different settings to get a feel for it..and I played with it some today with different thicknesses of metal.

The arc is constant & steady & smooth... It isn't anything like a crackerbox unit...they seem angry when operating...this thing just puts out the juice with hardly a whisper...I had to get close to tell it was on...the overhead light fixture was making more noise...

I think it's a keeper! ...I wanted a unit that would take care of heavy jobs that the wire welders would struggle to do... I haven't tried it on the highest settings,but the 100A-#3 setting was fierce...can't imagine what the 150A-#3 might be like.(It's connected to my 30Amp circuit for my plasma---that's why I didn't try the higher settings) I wasn't going to wire up a line if it didn't work.


I'll start designing some sort of case,that opens on the top, for it...all those exposed connections are scary. I'm thinking about a top section that can have the arc stabilizer mounted on it,but still allow access to the switches. The sides will remain open or get full vent grates while both ends will be closed.

I really wanted it for heavy duty stuff and then to hook up the arc stabilizer and tig torch for other stuff. It's passed the heavy duty test (want to try some bigger rods on high later)...next is the tig test.

The arc seems more controlled than a crackerbox unit,but it also seems more powerful than it should on the lowest settings... that may be because it is so quiet in operation and the arc is surprising to view or perhaps amp ratings were different 100 years ago when this thing was built...it doesn't seem to be straining to get the job done.:D

Well..It works like a dream and you can't ask for more than that...although I would have liked to have found more information on it.... someone asked if it (Omaha Electric Welder Corp.) might be a company that was absorbed by Lincoln in it's early years...another path to check out. Any thoughts in that direction?

I'll try to get some more updated pics as things progress as well as some weld shots of what it can do,after I get a line run for it.

Oldiron2
11-16-2008, 10:16 PM
Sounds as if you might want to get some amperage measurements; maybe it uses old American amps, not the 'newer, environmentally friendly, imported' ones.

mudbugone
11-16-2008, 10:49 PM
That's what I thought.... I can't do much about the lowest numbers--- 50/75 amps & #1 setting.... But it's great on 1/4"-5/16" for penetration and anything less I'll use one of the migs...and anything more...shouldn't be a problem for it to handle. It should fill in the gap for a shop welder that I needed.

I'm glad it will handle at least something thicker... I'm going to put a couple of welding tables together with it for practice to get used to it's qualities--one for inside & one big one for outside...then rework a couple of trailers and rework a couple of big 16' long I-beams into a trike jig.

mudbugone
11-21-2008, 06:01 PM
.

I've been looking at this welder some more & the ID plate states it's a 110-220 V unit.... I don't know a great deal about electricity and hook-up requirements,but I take that to indicate this unit could operate on 110V or 220V ---Correct?

If that's the case.... I have it connected to 220V as seen in the picture posted by connecting the two hot leads to the two terminals and the ground attached to the frame,as originally hooked up.

How would one go about hooking up this unit to operate on a 110V circuit? My first thought would be to attach one leg to one terminal & the other to the other terminal & of course the ground? Would the unit function this way? or is my thinking about how to attach the wires wrong?

I don't know if this would be a smart thing to do,but it might bring the power band down enough that the unit would do better with thinner metals. It seems pretty powerful even on the lowest settings and I want to attach an arc stabilizer to this machine to try some tig...since I have everything but the power source for it.

Any thoughts on this ??

Sorry--I thought the pics above would be transfered so you could see the electrical connections for the 220V http://i228.photobucket.com/albums/ee117/mudbugone/omahaarcwelder2.jpg

STwelder
12-08-2008, 01:52 AM
Forney C-5BT 1951 model according to Forney Inc.
Couldn't pass it up for 50.00 any way here's a few pictures of it during cleaning it up.
Thanks for looking.

mudbugone
12-08-2008, 04:44 AM
I found a similar unit but it was twice that price.... are the holes filled with dirt-dobber nests? The one I saw was too,obnoxous little pests.

Dualie
12-09-2008, 01:17 AM
mid to late 70's linde VI-400's that get used daily I have 4 of them. I also have a couple of mid 80's union carbide VI-400 that are just white faced linde's. I can honestly say that the one that gets used the most has easily had over a 1,000 rolls of wire run with it. Its on its second feeder though.

My forklift mechanic has an old Generator welder that he uses weekly. I would say early 50's Lincoln.

STwelder
12-09-2008, 02:24 AM
Yes the holes are filled with dirt dobbers nests. It welded great though once it was cleaned up, and the battery charger ground lug was put back into place from lying on the metal bottom of the housing, and insulating nut installed. Posted it ( the welds ) in projects and pictures.
All though the insulating nut is home made, it works just fine. Forney is supposed to be sending me another insulating nut for it since the first one was (according to the post office in the wrong type of mailer) and was lost. Can't complain though Forney didn't charge me a dime for the insulating nut either time, nor did they charge for user manual and owner manual.

lugweld
12-12-2008, 02:57 PM
Here's my old Penncraft. Anyone know who made it? It welds good.

lugweld
12-12-2008, 02:58 PM
Huh? lets try again.

metalworker
12-16-2008, 02:16 AM
Mine is an old Hobart generator welder 200 amps and works very good. I use it daily on my shop I think is 50's age. Also I have an much more old generator welder ASEA by now with armature burned. Soon I'll rewire it.

ciggs
12-26-2008, 11:31 PM
I have an old Lincoln 180 amp Wisconsin Gas powered, 2 cyl have to figure how to upload the picture think it from the late 50's just got last Saturday, had to do some minor adjustments, new carb gasket and going to lap the valves low compression, new plugs and some new gas and it fired up, now it runs on the first few turns.

had to clean up the armature a bit, runs great welds decent enough in its current shape. does anyone know where i can find more info or a manual for it?

lotechman
12-27-2008, 01:16 AM
does anyone know where i can find more info or a manual for it?

Lincoln will have a manual available online if not the exact one close enough .. same for Hobart manuals.

metalworker
12-27-2008, 01:22 AM
I have an old Lincoln 180 amp Wisconsin Gas powered, 2 cyl have to figure how to upload the picture think it from the late 50's just got last Saturday, had to do some minor adjustments, new carb gasket and going to lap the valves low compression, new plugs and some new gas and it fired up, now it runs on the first few turns.

had to clean up the armature a bit, runs great welds decent enough in its current shape. does anyone know where i can find more info or a manual for it?

You may contact with Tom wooding tom.wooding@wisconsinmotors.com for info of the engine. About the welder I don't know. Sorry. Good luck. I'm restoring an Hobart welder with wisconsin engine T F www.flickr.com/photos/cacahuatito www.youtube.com/watch?v=5xtwQ83LNro

kicbac67
05-02-2009, 01:07 PM
Wish I knew something about this one? LOL. I only know it's a Missing Link.

gizzardgutz
05-02-2009, 03:01 PM
1949 Sa 200 with a later model F162 Continental Red Seal grafted to it. All you gotta do is start the electrode and walk away, it'll finish the weld for you! :laugh::laugh:

TozziWelding
05-02-2009, 04:49 PM
Still using this old girl all the time too I believe she is a '64
http://i94.photobucket.com/albums/l110/TozziWelding/FirePit005.jpg

deucedj22
05-02-2009, 05:10 PM
I've used a few old Union Carbide power sources. You know, the guys that had that huge chemical spill in the middle east that killed millions of people.

48willys
05-02-2009, 11:42 PM
When I was a kid dad had an old Forney like the one StWelder posted pics of, heck could be the same one, Cincy ain't that far away. I know he sold it back in the early 80's and it was well used then. He's got the welder my grandfather had in his garage now, I think it's a Marquette. I've got a Marquette out in the shop he gave me but I've never used it as there's no electric in the barn. My old Chemtron "Bug" from all I can gather is from 1970, it does pretty well.

newelder
05-24-2009, 06:59 PM
I am very new to welding. I have always had an interest, but never taken the time. Recently, someone gave me this welder to help me get started. I do not know what brand or type it is. If you can identify if from the pictures I would be very appreciative. The brand name is mostly rusted off the front. The word "AC Carbon Arc Torch" and "250 Amp" are still visible. Some general labeling and instructions are partially visible on the front cover. The back has a serial number of W419178. I am hoping someone can identify it so that I might can find more information about it and possibly an old manual. Thank you very much for your help. Any advice for a "green" beginner is also welcome!

33597

33598

Thanks!

millman52
05-25-2009, 01:36 AM
My vote is for the "Missing Link" After all the Model # is 1

Here is my oldest I don't know the age probably late 50s or 60s. It still welds great. It's a 15HP electric motor driven generator. MIG machine.

I break it out & thread wire on it every time one of my newer machines goes down for repair.

Oldiron2
05-25-2009, 02:39 AM
I am very new to welding. I have always had an interest, but never taken the time. Recently, someone gave me this welder to help me get started. I do not know what brand or type it is. If you can identify if from the pictures I would be very appreciative. The brand name is mostly rusted off the front. The word "AC Carbon Arc Torch" and "250 Amp" are still visible. Some general labeling and instructions are partially visible on the front cover. The back has a serial number of W419178. I am hoping someone can identify it so that I might can find more information about it and possibly an old manual. Thank you very much for your help. Any advice for a "green" beginner is also welcome!Newelder, that unit was sold by Montgomery Wards, probably in the late 70's-early 80's. I have the catalog it was listed in, somewhere. I have no idea who built it, but know it's well-made; I just lubed the locking handle on, and blew the dust out of one last week.
I could 'eventually' send you, or post here, a picture of the front panel if you could use the picture to make a correct size photocopy to transfer to a new front face on yours. I don't think cleaning, Bondo and a new paint job would be as good or as easy as a new faceplate, do you?
The carbon arc directions refer to settings to use with the C.A. torch (which a recent thread discussed) that was available through Wards. The only other markings you really need are the DC polarity; the positive (+) terminal is the lower right.
I would open it up, clean it of dirt and dust, then check for corrosion and bad connections before trying to use it.
Do you have the cables for it? Their connectors are just slightly-tapered brass plugs and are a press fit into the sockets on the welder.

So far as a manual goes, it didn't say much, for there isn't much to say. Pull up on the lock handle to the right, move the amperage control to where you want it, push the lock handle down. Plug the cables in to the two AC, or the two DC sockets to get the type current or polarity you want, and turn the switch on. To learn about proper settings, you'll need to go elsewhere, although the faceplate did have some general recommendations for amperage.

BTW, the 250 Amp output refers to both the AC and the DC settings!

millman52
05-25-2009, 01:45 PM
Someone else showed a Pencraft I sure JC Penney Co. That works similar. I had a sears that worked the same only the dials are dirfferent. On the sears the dial was directly on top the Pencraft it sweeps left to right. The common link between all of them is the clamp handle on the center right front. I have also seen a Century that is a mirror image of the Pencraft other than color. I would imagine they all may have been made by the same mfg.

The Sears I had was a pretty good welder. I don't think it ever seen usage other than DC reverse though. I finally gave it to someone as I had accumulater bigger & better stuff & no longer needed it.

newelder
05-26-2009, 10:20 PM
Oldiron2:

Thank you very much for taking the time to look at the welder and help me identify it. I would REALLY appreciate it if you could send me a picture of a clearer faceplate. I will definitely open this welder up and clean up and check connections before I use it. I do have the cables with it. I just need to shorten one where it looks like the wire was nicked. I am also finishing up my 220V circuit. I did not have an extra plug for this in my shop in a location that I could drag it outside. I have really enjoyed this forum and appreciate everyone being so helpful. I have learned a lot in the last several days. Thanks again. I am sure that you are busy with more important things, but I would appreciate you emailing me photo(s) of the faceplate when you have time. Please email them to rdrawdy@hotmail.com Many thanks!

newelder
05-26-2009, 10:23 PM
Newelder, that unit was sold by Montgomery Wards, probably in the late 70's-early 80's. I have the catalog it was listed in, somewhere. I have no idea who built it, but know it's well-made; I just lubed the locking handle on, and blew the dust out of one last week.
I could 'eventually' send you, or post here, a picture of the front panel if you could use the picture to make a correct size photocopy to transfer to a new front face on yours. I don't think cleaning, Bondo and a new paint job would be as good or as easy as a new faceplate, do you?
The carbon arc directions refer to settings to use with the C.A. torch (which a recent thread discussed) that was available through Wards. The only other markings you really need are the DC polarity; the positive (+) terminal is the lower right.
I would open it up, clean it of dirt and dust, then check for corrosion and bad connections before trying to use it.
Do you have the cables for it? Their connectors are just slightly-tapered brass plugs and are a press fit into the sockets on the welder.

So far as a manual goes, it didn't say much, for there isn't much to say. Pull up on the lock handle to the right, move the amperage control to where you want it, push the lock handle down. Plug the cables in to the two AC, or the two DC sockets to get the type current or polarity you want, and turn the switch on. To learn about proper settings, you'll need to go elsewhere, although the faceplate did have some general recommendations for amperage.

BTW, the 250 Amp output refers to both the AC and the DC settings!
Thank you very much for taking the time to look at the welder and help me identify it. I would REALLY appreciate it if you could send me a picture of a clearer faceplate. I will definitely open this welder up and clean up and check connections before I use it. I do have the cables with it. I just need to shorten one where it looks like the wire was nicked. I am also finishing up my 220V circuit. I did not have an extra plug for this in my shop in a location that I could drag it outside. I have really enjoyed this forum and appreciate everyone being so helpful. I have learned a lot in the last several days. Thanks again. I am sure that you are busy with more important things, but I would appreciate you emailing me photo(s) of the faceplate when you have time. Please email them to rdrawdy@hotmail.com Many thanks!

Felonyass Monk
05-26-2009, 10:30 PM
How about a thread on OLDEST GUYS still using a welder?
Felon:laugh::laugh::laugh::dizzy:

mudbugone
05-26-2009, 11:37 PM
A bunch of us..LOL

Newelder..I figured someone here would ID yours...You got lucky that Oldiron2 could provide that much info...I'd be happy with the AC/DC ability,( a new one is $5-600 hundred bucks)...Buy whoever gave it to you a couple of good steaks to grill..;)

If your lead isn't too badly damaged you might just tape the damaged spot up..your description of the damage seemed minor.

zjtins
06-29-2009, 01:11 PM
Got this one a few months ago. Been learning welding on it (bumpers for my Jeep). Put in a 50 amp 6 gauge line and its runs great. I can weld @100 amps all day.

MarkBall2
06-29-2009, 09:57 PM
Don't have a picture of it, but Dad has an Allton Brothers welder on the farm. Old stick welder with the plug in taps similar to the Forney's. Get a 1/4" rod plug into the ground & 'C' tap, it would cut most of the steel we had to cut. Either that or dad gave me the hack saw & said "have at it"..........(2" square solid toolbar)

After I went into the Air Force, he finally bought a torch set up at a farm sale. My nephew is running the farm now has a Miller 251 sitting out there now. He's never even struck an arc with the old one.

Burn It Hot )))))))
08-15-2009, 10:09 PM
ive got a 1949' sa 200 shorthood. just repainted and guages installed. need new dials and faceplate though

Welderskelter
08-16-2009, 03:01 PM
I have a 1945 model Lincoln SA 200. It doesnt have a serial number and the guy at the factory couldnt even get me some new rubber bushings that go on the flywheel to make the armature turn. But I went to town and found hydraulic hose the right size had them cut me some and I was in bussiness. It doesnt have a starter hole for the starter so has to be started with a crank. It does have a rheostat not just a chain to wind it up to get more heat so its a good welder. Shes weak and fouls a plug on the first cylinder after about 15 min. I have an overhead engine from a swather I am going to put on it. Still a good smoth welder. Always starts on the fourth crank. Harold

mudbugone
08-18-2009, 12:52 AM
This is one of my favorite threads. I really enjoy the history and pictures of the different unusual welders that have been made thru the years. The personal stories attached to some of these gems are great too.

I still haven't tracked down anymore information on the very old Omaha AC welder I've got,but I'm still able to use it and bought an old arc stabilizer/starter that I'm planning to attach to it to try some Tig (If the Stabilizer works).

Everyone Please keep adding to this thread....It's a great reference source for everyone as well as interesting.:waving:

A_DAB_will_do
08-18-2009, 09:18 AM
Here's one that sitting in our shop. It works, but we don't have an outlet wired up that we can run it with, yet.

91Runner
09-12-2009, 09:14 AM
Just signed up to the site after seeing this thread. So I figured I join and post a ficture of my old Forney C-5, it's not the oldes but still old. All I've done to it is change the leads and the power wire and plug due to them being brittle.

Currently I am using it to build bumpers for my truck and other such items.

http://i198.photobucket.com/albums/aa134/LarryWannamaker/DCFC0003-1.jpg

I should add that it came with about 30 lbs of assorted rods, 2 plastic rod cases, helmet, 2 pairs of leather gloves and a very large Ammo box to house all the stuff.

mudbugone
09-12-2009, 10:51 AM
It may not be the oldest,but it's still a dandy and in great condition. Welcome to the party BTW.:waving:

Ken Dennis
09-12-2009, 11:47 AM
Just signed up to the site after seeing this thread. So I figured I join and post a ficture of my old Forney C-5, it's not the oldes but still old. All I've done to it is change the leads and the power wire and plug due to them being brittle.

Currently I am using it to build bumpers for my truck and other such items.

http://i198.photobucket.com/albums/aa134/LarryWannamaker/DCFC0003-1.jpg

I should add that it came with about 30 lbs of assorted rods, 2 plastic rod cases, helmet, 2 pairs of leather gloves and a very large Ammo box to house all the stuff.

Seen one on Craigslist just like that one not long ago in my are for sale, thought about getting it, but it was gone when I called!

Nice old Forney!

gnewby
09-12-2009, 04:17 PM
I think those old Forney's are pretty much bullet proof, they will last and last. I had one for quite awhile it did a good job. Only reason I don't have it any longer I went to a AC-DC welder.

P.S. Yours looks to be in great condition, if you look back through the posts for this thread you will see a photo of the old Forney I used to have. Also found while I had it that the Forney folks were great people to deal with. I never needed any parts for it but I did get with them to see if they had any old manuals around for it. They sent me a manual at no-charge.

91Runner
09-12-2009, 06:41 PM
I went through every page, with everyone I was like a kid on X-mas. I did see the old Forney. I contacted Forney and got a PDF user manual and some other info. Mine works like a charm. I've used a few different Arc welders over the years and I'm sure mine works better than most. I do however wish I had a garage/shop to weld in, this summer has been really rainy - check the weather every morning to see if I can break it out or not..... Blaaaa....

denrep
09-12-2009, 07:08 PM
Hello 91runner,

There's another Forney thread over here:
http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?t=31355

91Runner
09-13-2009, 08:32 AM
Thanks, I'll check it out!

GiddyWelder
09-13-2009, 08:43 AM
The KARC-100 I have I'm not sure it's a 1986 model(I could be wrong on that though)

jimcolt
09-13-2009, 11:40 AM
OK......I've got an almost new Hobart mig......but my oldest welder is 53. (see picture)

Jim

gnewby
09-13-2009, 11:50 AM
I went through every page, with everyone I was like a kid on X-mas. I did see the old Forney. I contacted Forney and got a PDF user manual and some other info. Mine works like a charm. I've used a few different Arc welders over the years and I'm sure mine works better than most. I do however wish I had a garage/shop to weld in, this summer has been really rainy - check the weather every morning to see if I can break it out or not..... Blaaaa....

91Runner do you find your Forney likes some welding rod and others it doesn't? I could always use 6013,7014, both great, 6011 it was so so, but couldn't do much with the 7018. When I went to strickly AC 7018 after finally gettting it to arc I could get a bead to run.

With the 7018 AC-DC rod, it was like someone had turned the power down to next to zero. Even with the power maxed out on the old Forney it was like that.

smawgmaw
09-13-2009, 11:56 AM
:confused: Oh Jim! If that's your mug (not saying its a bad one, actually pretty good), you know you just openned up yourself for some good old ribbing !!! I'll refrain for know, but later, who knows!

jimcolt
09-13-2009, 02:05 PM
The same pic is on the Hypertherm web site....so I guess its public!

Jim

91Runner
09-13-2009, 10:06 PM
91Runner do you find your Forney likes some welding rod and others it doesn't? I could always use 6013,7014, both great, 6011 it was so so, but couldn't do much with the 7018. When I went to strickly AC 7018 after finally gettting it to arc I could get a bead to run.

With the 7018 AC-DC rod, it was like someone had turned the power down to next to zero. Even with the power maxed out on the old Forney it was like that.

So far I haven't had an issue with the rod, but that's only because every rod I've used came with my welder - go figure. I will be trying some 7018AC/DC soon enough, co I'll let you know!

mater
09-13-2009, 10:44 PM
My grandpa has a sears machine he said is 30 to 40 years old not sure what model! Why cant things now days last as long as they use to? Im 23 and Im always coming across stuff my dad and grandpa has that are 30 years old or older and they still work! DAMN CHINESE

91Runner
11-25-2009, 08:11 AM
91Runner do you find your Forney likes some welding rod and others it doesn't? I could always use 6013,7014, both great, 6011 it was so so, but couldn't do much with the 7018. When I went to strickly AC 7018 after finally gettting it to arc I could get a bead to run.

With the 7018 AC-DC rod, it was like someone had turned the power down to next to zero. Even with the power maxed out on the old Forney it was like that.

Finally tried some 7018 AC/DC - I had the same outcome as you. Oh well, I guess I'll just go get some 6013 and some 7014 because I'm now out of rod.... Need to finish my bumper and plow...

kbeitz
12-30-2009, 08:06 AM
http://user.pa.net/~kbeitz/Post-em/Welder.jpg

http://user.pa.net/~kbeitz/Post-em/welder2.JPG

mudbugone
12-30-2009, 10:40 AM
Oh No you don't.... That's way too interesting to just post pics with no text. Now that's an old welder...how about some information about it.;)

specter
12-30-2009, 10:45 AM
Gee Kbeitz where did you locate that thing? I have to agree with mudbugone in that some more info on that welder would be nice such as Manufacturer's name, date manufactured.

mudbugone
12-30-2009, 02:36 PM
This things been facinating my imagination since I first saw it this morning.

It's difficult to figure it's size from the pics...I'm guessing about 18"-24" tall. I still haven't figured out the strange "light bulbs" or their purpose (but they're cool) I bet replacements aren't easy to find either.

Anyone think they might be a 'fuse' of sorts? The three power lines all come together 'after' power is transferred thru them. If they light up it's transferring power?

Gotta love a welder that looks like it came from Frankensteins workshop:laugh: I thought mine was the oldest one around,but I think you've got it beat.

I don't know about the others here,but I'd sure like some information and particulars on it...great little contraption.

64 thousand dollar question? Have you used it? :waving:

millman52
12-30-2009, 06:53 PM
Hey Great Find.....

LMAO Where is the connection for the primary side earth safety ground???????

kbeitz
12-30-2009, 07:49 PM
I found it in a barn years ago... It have been posted on this forum with pictures in June 2007...

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?t=11951&highlight=oldest+welder

The bulbs are DC rectifying ... Age ???

mudbugone
12-30-2009, 08:29 PM
Pictures of Omaha welder.
http://i228.photobucket.com/albums/ee117/mudbugone/omahaarcwelder.jpg

http://i228.photobucket.com/albums/ee117/mudbugone/omahaarcwelder4.jpg

http://i228.photobucket.com/albums/ee117/mudbugone/omahaarcwelder5.jpg

http://i228.photobucket.com/albums/ee117/mudbugone/omahaarcwelder3.jpg

http://i228.photobucket.com/albums/ee117/mudbugone/omahaarcwelder2.jpg

OK boys! Do I win the oldest welder prize?


Well back here at post #67 I thought I had the oldest welder prize sewn up:cry:,but I'm happy to concede to your little dandy...I'm with you "I love that thing too!" :waving:

Near as I've been able to figure mine probably dates back to at least the 20's (I still haven't found anything comparable... just similar and it was from the late 20's,but had 'newer type' lead connectors.)

I'd say your's pre-dates that time period,making it about a 100 YO machine. (It wasn't used to build mine--Mine's wood!) :laugh:

You didn't say how big it is...I'm just curious? What's it weigh? Those tubes or whatever they are screw in like big light bulbs--Right? Very large sockets-Right? If you care to take the time to be a bit more descriptive about them,I'll try to locate some spares in my spare time...they can't be simple to find,but I love a challenge,especially for an interesting cause.

I've been looking for over a year for three antique female panel connectors for mine and just found exactly three last night.(Dumb Luck).

Please expand the information on this little gem. Anyone think it could be replicated in some fashion? I'd love to try...it's just too interesting.

Thanks for sharing AGAIN...pretty cool! I like old things anyway and the more obscure they are the better I like it.

mudbugone
01-01-2010, 02:33 AM
Don't know if this is the same type tube,but it's close...didn't expect to find one that soon..LOL

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=390137383789&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT

HAPPY NEW YEAR !!! :cool2:

racinjason44
01-01-2010, 03:04 AM
Wish I knew something about this one? LOL. I only know it's a Missing Link.

That is the coolest looking welder I have ever seen.

farmersamm
01-01-2010, 04:07 AM
Oldest weldor WELDOR, NOT WELDER:laugh:, is me. And I just got a year older tonight, and I ain't getting any better

Happy New Year:drinkup:

Tractapac
01-01-2010, 05:04 AM
Oldest weldor WELDOR, NOT WELDER:laugh:, is me. And I just got a year older tonight, and I ain't getting any better

Happy New Year:drinkup:

Happy New Year to you too, Sam. Also, Many Happy Returns.

denrep
01-01-2010, 09:48 AM
. . .Near as I've been able to figure mine probably dates back to at least the 20's (I still haven't found anything comparable... just similar and it was from the late 20's,but had 'newer type' lead connectors.)

Mudbugone - I'm guessing your welder's age as pre-1920, because by 1920 US manufacturers were offering transformer-type welders which were neatly packaged in "modern" cabinet enclosures, devoid of knife switches and exposed terminals. Basically, some of the transformer jobs were as -if not more- capable and refined as today's "buzz box" welder.

Around '20 and before, the majority of heavy industrial welders were DC units of the motor-generator type. Although other types, including engine drives, were also commercially available.

I do wonder about electrode availability for the very early AC welders, because for some reason I had thought that AC rod wasn't worth mentioning until at earliest the mid to late 20's; but I'm not sure about that.

Good Luck

mudbugone
01-01-2010, 02:21 PM
Oldest weldor WELDOR, NOT WELDER:laugh:, is me. And I just got a year older tonight, and I ain't getting any better

Happy New Year:drinkup:

And we thought those flames in the distance were fireworks...not cake candles!

denrep...From all my research into old welders... I found that like you say prior to the twenties they were mostly DC units. The one example I found with a wooden case was in a museum and I neglected to save the link and can't find it again. I think it was from 1926-7 and similar to mine with the exception it had an enclosed case with modern type plug-in connection points.

Mine may have had a fancy wooden case surround originally,but it had a crude plywood box around it when I got it. I doubt it was original to the welder,too rough. Since I found no indication of screw or nail attachments to the original framework holding the windings...the original case may have been built to slide down over the framework (like a portable sewing machine case) if indeed it was ever closed in. That's how I'm going to build a 'cover' for it at any rate to keep the open controls from zapping anyone. I'll still leave an opening lid on it to adjust the large blade voltage & if the three panel connectors I just bought are acceptable I'll mount them into that case cover for the 1-2-3 level connections.

This way I can make it safe and more user friendly without altering it's antique value in any way. I get a kick out of guys looking it over and stepping back even when it isn't plugged in and really drawing back when asked to try it out. It works to perfection even on the lowest settings,and they all comment on how smooth and steady the arc seems. I need to go watch the meter wheel spin while someone else is playing with it...I keep forgetting to do that:dizzy:

kkzxxx
01-02-2010, 01:20 PM
I use it every day, works on 2-phases, 1 phase 220v OCV 46V (welds sheet 1,2 mm pretty good)
and 2-phases 380v OCV 77V. Dont know anything about the amps but ive used rods size 5-6.Cuts 7-8mm metal without problem.
http://www.fileden.com/files/2006/11/11/369796/18137168.jpg
http://www.fileden.com/files/2006/11/11/369796/18136519.jpg

millman52
01-02-2010, 02:13 PM
"I need to go watch the meter wheel spin while someone else is playing with it...I keep forgetting to do that"

I'm sure it will spin much faster. The meter wheel will really go even with a modern machine. That is if your meter still has a wheel. All the meters in this area are now digital & the reading process is simply a "drive by" or from the air. I haven't seen a "meter reader" in about 4 years now.

mudbugone
01-02-2010, 07:05 PM
I use it every day, works on 2-phases, 1 phase 220v OCV 46V (welds sheet 1,2 mm pretty good)
and 2-phases 380v OCV 77V. Dont know anything about the amps but ive used rods size 5-6.Cuts 7-8mm metal without problem.
http://www.fileden.com/files/2006/11/11/369796/18137168.jpg
http://www.fileden.com/files/2006/11/11/369796/18136519.jpg

Welcome aboard kkzxxx..... I'm going to assume you're located somewhere in central Europe?

I doubt that machine would pass OSHA inspection..LOL Even my old 400# unit wouldn't pass inspection... It's interesting what other countries design to weld with..necessity is indeed the mother of invention...

Yours ain't pretty (mine either) but as you say, you use it every day,so function overrules a pretty case.:laugh:

I ran across this ...most of us just don't appreciate our plug-n-play toys..this guy would love to have even a HF cheapo I bet..

http://www.flickr.com/photos/connors934/sets/72157601421044853/

kkzxxx
01-02-2010, 09:10 PM
Welcome aboard kkzxxx..... I'm going to assume you're located somewhere in central Europe?

I doubt that machine would pass OSHA inspection..LOL Even my old 400# unit wouldn't pass inspection... It's interesting what other countries design to weld with..necessity is indeed the mother of invention...

Yours ain't pretty (mine either) but as you say, you use it every day,so function overrules a pretty case.:laugh:

I ran across this ...most of us just don't appreciate our plug-n-play toys..this guy would love to have even a HF cheapo I bet..

http://www.flickr.com/photos/connors934/sets/72157601421044853/

yes almost in central Europe, little bit to the east but u got it pretty right :D
The reason i use something so old is because duty cycle almost don't exist for this machine :laugh: new machine that's capable of welding from sheet metal to hard steel with normal duty cycle costs too much,

And about those flickr pictures....... i assume u have seen these?
http://www.fileden.com/files/2006/11/11/369796/3555_image006X1X.jpg
http://www.fileden.com/files/2006/11/11/369796/3555_image007X1X.jpg
http://www.fileden.com/files/2006/11/11/369796/3555_image005X1X.jpg

are the flickr pics tune-up version of this fine machine? :D

mudbugone
01-02-2010, 10:30 PM
I'm going to assume that the output is controlled on your machine by the buss bar being moved to other positions...as indicated by the scribed lines on the face ?? It's at it's hottest(?) setting in the picture and as you lower the buss bar link down the output drops too?

That's a similar arrangement to the welder above with the 3 bulbs on it...except it has plug sockets so the lead can be moved depending on the level of output desired instead of moving the buss bar like yours.

I have seen the crude assembly you posted somewhere before and some others that made it look factory..LOL... But then most everyone that sees my old AC thinks I'm nuts for plugging it into a wall (until they try it:laugh:)

I figure it's been around for almost a 100 years and wasn't convicted of killing anyone yet or it would have been destroyed somewhere along it's path...so I'll hang onto it.

Anything with this much juice running thru it is dangerous...if you act a fool using it it will bite you.

millman52
01-02-2010, 10:49 PM
I take exception to lots of the "safety" stuff that is imposed on us today. While I agree safety is important in any workplace & at home. There just isn't a clear or even a good gray line drawn when it comes to liability.

Where or why isn't there a line drawn that each person has some responcibility for their own safety.
The civil courts want business owners & home owners to accept practically all responcibility to keep others safe.

I have some older machine tools that didn't have belt guards on them when new. Although I have fabbed guards for them now. The spinning 36" chuck on a lathe that by nature has the ability to grab & tear your arm of is ok as long as I have some sort of a chip gard on it to help keep chips from flying. On the other hand a pulley that is well behind the machine & out of any ordinary traffic flow must be housed up so tight you couldn't get a finger in it if you tried.

mudbugone
01-02-2010, 11:07 PM
I think most of the older members can relate to what you're saying... As kids we rode bikes without helmets or pads and 'most' of us survived gravel roads...those that did not usually did something ignorant of their own choice. We even had merry-go-rounds (which have been outlawed as too dangerous) which were enormously fun to get spinning as fast as possible.

OSHA does some good,but there are many things they do that are to justify their continued existance and jobs. They have jobs but all the jobs have been shipped overseas to avoid their rules...so their days are numbered too,since there aren't many left for them to oversee.

If you spill 'HOT' coffee in your lap you are a klutz and don't deserve $$$$ for being dumb....you don't even deserve another cup of coffee.No one should be compensated for being an idiot and hurting themselves.

Short people should sue the state for building sidewalks so close to their butts.:dizzy:

millman52
01-03-2010, 11:24 AM
I know I'm off topic here just one more rant & I'll hush up. You had to mention the McD's & coffee in the lap. ANYONE WHO HAS EVER DRANK COFFEE KNOWS YOU HAVE TO BOIL WATER TO MAKE IT. No one can escape childhood & know enough to drive an auto without knowing fresh coffee can & will scald you. Not only that I'd be willing to bet the same person would have BITC*** if it were only warm.

sparksweldingandfab
01-19-2010, 01:09 AM
I can't beat some of these old shop welders you guys posted but here is a couple of my Hobart.

mudbugone
01-19-2010, 06:18 AM
Looks like an Oldie but a Goodie to me... I'm interested in each and every machine that's been posted. The age isn't as important as the history & design of the various pieces of equipment.

That Hobart is from the 40's,maybe earlier(?),but it's still a great piece of equipment. You made me think ..... I hope others aren't posting to this thread because they think their machines aren't as old as the others,or as interesting. That isn't the case, every machine has it's place in this timeline. There is very little information out there on old welders and once I discovered that...this thread took on new significance.

I can appreciate each & every machine posted and enjoy them. This thread acts as a repository of the various machines that have been made and more importantly... some machines have aged to the point they are difficult to ID,but if someone posts a picture of the same unit it helps others.

This becomes our own encyclopedia of old welding machines as a resource and as an interesting amusement.... I know I've enjoyed it and go back to the beginning from time to time to re-read the thread.

So,anyone with an old machine or information that adds to the data base' Please' don't hesitate to post just because you don't think your machine or info is the oldest. I find something of interest everytime someone posts to this thread.

jkh23046
01-19-2010, 01:07 PM
Use hobart 250 best I can tell is around 1952 model.Can set for months and always starts right up.Tough machine.Has cj willis 4 cyl engine so parts are easy to find.

Ken Dennis
01-19-2010, 02:18 PM
My grandpa has a sears machine he said is 30 to 40 years old not sure what model! Why cant things now days last as long as they use to? Im 23 and Im always coming across stuff my dad and grandpa has that are 30 years old or older and they still work! DAMN CHINESE

Its not so much the Chinese that is the problem.
30 to 40 years ago and so on, there was ample opportunity to buy cheaply made products that where made both here and abroad, but the average person was more inclined back then to spend the extra to get the quality that they where after, even if it meant waiting and saving up until you could afford it, which in turn, made one appreciate that item more and was more inclined to take better care of it because of its higher value and hard work that went into the obtaining of it.
where as today, the average consumer is a
"Got to have it now, don't care if it isn't as good as long as it does what I am wanting it to right now, even if it doesn't quite work right and probably will break soon after buying it and I don't care about it because it was cheap and it can be replaced easy enough" type of person.

In most cases, even today, there are quality made items that can be got, take for example, a drill bit, you have to ask yourself, am I a buy it at a big box store, made in some place like China or Pakistan type of person, or am I a buy quality through a distributor or local specialty store where the price will be higher for the quality, made in USA, Germany, Italy, or so on first quality making country item type of person!

Sorry, getting down off my soapbox now! :D

millman52
01-19-2010, 04:56 PM
Every piece of older engine powered equipment I have has had the ole internal regulated Delco alternator conversion put on it. I found self exciting voltage regulators somewhere for them (about $15.00 ea.) Makes them super simple to use then. Only need the Hot wire from the stud on the rear to the battery.

Metarinka
01-19-2010, 09:56 PM
got an old P&H welder from the early to mid 60's

not privy to say where I work but we have equipment, presses, punches etc dating back to WWI. If it isn't broke don't fix it. I was just working on a press from 1944. No clue how many millions of cycles it ran.

slcolvin
02-17-2010, 08:17 PM
lincoln electric ownes hobart welders . thay may have a history if you can come up with model or ser numbers good luck

slcolvin
02-17-2010, 09:09 PM
i think you hit the nale on the head . it's sad so meny of us dont think it's a qoiston patriotism
if more popel would sad no thanks . I WANT AMERICAN . dose histore repeat itsilf ?
at one time the japanese purchast ever pound of scrap iron from us thin turn around and
gave it back to us at pearlharbor today scrap iron is at a all time high it's bound to
china will we ever learn ??

gnewby
02-17-2010, 09:10 PM
lincoln electric ownes hobart welders . thay may have a history if you can come up with model or ser numbers good luck

Slcolvin , you are very wrong, Hobart is a division of Miller!

jimcolt
02-17-2010, 09:57 PM
Miller and Hobart are both divisions of ITW.....Ilinois Tool Works.

Stick-man
03-01-2010, 08:28 PM
The LincWelder DC180AS (on loan from friend indefinately)

This thing runs good and welds great. The middle output stud is dead, I might try to fix it. And maybe I will give it a coat of RED, or should I do it BLUE? :laugh:

kolot
03-02-2010, 01:34 AM
Does this count? This is Syncrowave Dave,I only bring him in on big heavy dirty jobs. Oh wait a minute did you mean machine or man?

smawgmaw
03-02-2010, 06:57 PM
The LincWelder DC180AS (on loan from friend indefinately)

This thing runs good and welds great. The middle output stud is dead, I might try to fix it. And maybe I will give it a coat of RED, or should I do it BLUE? :laugh:

How about gray like the older engine drives were painted? Nice, I would love to "play" with some old iron like that! :waving:

sparksweldingandfab
03-23-2010, 01:37 AM
I know this is plenty late for a responce but I just caught back up with this post, I wanted to say that I actually thought that welder had to be one of the oldest and was surprised to see how far back some of these machines went. Iposted hopefully to see another alike, or someone that had seen or known another machine like this one. It finally choked up on me and quit welding, but still starts right up and runs, even puts out power to the dc outlet. I think one of the shunt coils are bad. I've had problems finding someone who will work on this machine because there is no way of getting a wiring diagram or any diagrams for that matter. They just don't exist for this old of a machine Iguess.

Crawford
03-23-2010, 02:49 AM
Still using this old girl all the time too I believe she is a '64
http://i94.photobucket.com/albums/l110/TozziWelding/FirePit005.jpg

we have close to 9 or 10 of these in the shop @ the local JC.

mudbugone
03-23-2010, 03:08 AM
I know this is plenty late for a responce but I just caught back up with this post, I wanted to say that I actually thought that welder had to be one of the oldest and was surprised to see how far back some of these machines went. Iposted hopefully to see another alike, or someone that had seen or known another machine like this one. It finally choked up on me and quit welding, but still starts right up and runs, even puts out power to the dc outlet. I think one of the shunt coils are bad. I've had problems finding someone who will work on this machine because there is no way of getting a wiring diagram or any diagrams for that matter. They just don't exist for this old of a machine Iguess.

Since it's a Hobart unit... you might try http://www.hobartwelders.com/weldtalk/index.php someone there might either have one or know something about that particular machine.

You might get lucky and find the information on fixing it. I'd hate to see it sink into dis-use for lack of information on it. It looks like a dandy machine.

slcolvin
03-23-2010, 11:34 PM
i am 69 years yong and want to buld another portabel welding rig . a good s a 200 or a newer
ranger 250 gtx . if you have a good sa 200 or ranger email me at ( slcolvin@rangeweb.net ) or pitchers mail to l h colvin po box 880 forsyth mt. 59327 .thanks ruffisc721

Maedar
03-24-2010, 12:02 AM
Miller AEAD 200LE, mid-80's model

Metarinka
03-24-2010, 07:35 PM
oh I forgot to mention

I really wish I could get a picture of it. We have on of the oldest working electron beam welder in the world. In fact it was one of the first commercial units built of its class (serial number 02)

what really cracks me up is that it's a manual beam welder. In that a very skilled operator has to operate just about every parameter by hand. Oscilloscopes are used to characterize the beam and it has the coolest looking scope ever. The electronic controls take up several cabinets, which could be replaced by a single CPU and modern digital I/O if the machine had the capability.

thecheese429
04-26-2010, 05:47 PM
Sounds as if you might want to get some amperage measurements; maybe it uses old American amps, not the 'newer, environmentally friendly, imported' ones.

Kind of like how my chinese (northern tool) bench grinder has 1/2 chinese horsepower, not the good ol' 1/2 american workhorse-power.

SEAR
04-27-2010, 10:37 AM
just brought home my *new* AC180T pretty sure it was made in 1959 :blob3:

thecheese429
04-27-2010, 06:12 PM
http://i41.tinypic.com/23vb37k.jpg

There's my forney C-6 welder. Probably from the 60's. It seems to weld just fine with 6011, even though others have said that it doesn't like those.

http://i41.tinypic.com/qx1a1g.jpg
There's the inside

Matt_Maguire
04-28-2010, 10:09 AM
Hobart RCC 610, built 1974 600AmpCV@100% and 400AmpCC@60% (big lump inside that, about the size of a Hugo)... used constantly. Fused 200amp @ 240V input...

Before the merger was approved with ITW and Hobert Bros by the FTC. Hobart had to sell off some patents and product lines (for more or less a "song").

Thermal Arc got the type 17 and 27 wire feeders, tap/SCR and tap/tap CV transformer machines, large SCR fired CV machines (including sub arc) and some property cheap.

ITW (owner of Miller) got all the inverters (the Arc Master patents were the crown jewel here), the TIG patents and lines, small SCR fired CV machines and the powered generator welder lines and patents. And more property. The Arc Master technology is where the fast rise pulse (low smoke) comes from. I'm not sure what if any TIG tech Miller actually used.

Hobart was on the edge of bankrupcy from developing inverter technology and due to some other poor decisions could no longer compete very well.

Matt

ExpatWelder
04-28-2010, 11:14 AM
I'm still using a 1948 Pipeliner and it still runs perfect, crank starts even in sub-zero temps

Matt_Maguire
04-28-2010, 08:29 PM
I'm still using a 1948 Pipeliner and it still runs perfect, crank starts even in sub-zero temps

Ghana! How long ago did that Lincoln run away from home...:drinkup:

Matt

ExpatWelder
04-29-2010, 06:27 AM
Ghana! How long ago did that Lincoln run away from home...:drinkup:

Matt
The machine is in the US, I just happen to be in West Africa on a job at the moment--Matt (also)

skyboltone
09-26-2010, 12:08 AM
we have close to 9 or 10 of these in the shop @ the local JC. Hello Crawford and the rest. First post. I just bought this: http://i54.tinypic.com/ddmb8m.jpg (Picking it up Monday)

I'm going to somewhat restore it. If one of you fellers with access to a digital camera could snap a few pics of the front of a clean one that would help. My Nephew can make me vinyl overlays just like the originals if we can get a look at some.

Dan

John R
09-26-2010, 01:17 PM
I have a Century AC 295 amp Buzz Box that is from the late 60's early 70's, it still works great.

Thing has 100% duty cycle up to 120 amps

Marine5068
09-28-2010, 06:25 PM
I have an old industrial Lincoln 300amp Stick and TIG welder.
Not sure of age but it's a HUGE grey monster of about 550lbs.
I'll post a pic of it later.

Marine5068
09-28-2010, 06:26 PM
Another I own is an old "buzzbox" Sears stick welder.

tkanzler
09-28-2010, 11:18 PM
Speaking of old buzz-boxes, this is the only welder I own. Or have ever owned. :laugh:

Mid-70's, 40-230A, movable core, AC only. Union Carbide in Linde colors. I've been dragging this thing around for the last 30+ years, and only put it back to work recently, just for fun. But I've done a lot of truck and equipment repair with it, long, long ago, and it owes me nothing.

I only posted it as I've never seen another one like it in all these years. I bought it from a welding supply house, but I guess UC/Linde didn't sell many.

http://i56.tinypic.com/esncwk.jpg

Stock 87
09-30-2010, 11:25 AM
I don't know what year it is but chances are it's older than me. After the initial cleaning, I use it weekly.

http://i740.photobucket.com/albums/xx47/stock87/welder003.jpg

http://i740.photobucket.com/albums/xx47/stock87/e3b90e0f.jpg

kbeitz
10-01-2010, 09:40 PM
The welder is 20 inches tall... No names or ID anywhere...
The reason it has glass bulbs is because its a DC welder...
The bulbs are DC rectfiers...

http://user.pa.net/~kbeitz/Post-em/welder2.JPG

http://user.pa.net/~kbeitz/Post-em/Oldest%20welder.JPG

Rugar
10-01-2010, 09:45 PM
The welder is 20 inches tall... No names or ID anywhere...
The reason it has glass bulbs is because its a DC welder...
The bulbs are DC rectfiers...


Now thats cool! :cool:

C6.7weldrig
10-01-2010, 10:56 PM
The welder is 20 inches tall... No names or ID anywhere...
The reason it has glass bulbs is because its a DC welder...
The bulbs are DC rectfiers...




Now that is truly amazing:cool:
Does it actually still work.... if so how does it weld.... that is really interesting:cool:

denrep
10-02-2010, 12:35 AM
Kbeitz, Do you know for a fact that it's a welder?
With the lack of finished detail, it almost looks more like a sub-assembly of another machine, rather than a stand-alone welder.

And the more I look at it... the core design, the rectifiers, the small conductors, I can't help but wonder if it actually is a welder? :confused:

Good Luck

I'm very curious about the Kbeitz machine but I still have doubts that it's a welder.

I just don't see it as having the ampacity for welding. As for it being a manufactured welding machine, I can't place the components and assembly in an era where it makes sense for this to be a production piece.

For example, look at the production tube sockets, split bolt, screw terminal, hex hardware, the welds at the "hanger" and also the base welds. The base appears to be bent and spot welded sheet metal. By the time hex-bolts and welds and other items seen here were common in manufacturing, welders were waaay beyond this in refinement.

When compared to even pre WW-I era welding equipment, this just doesn't pass as a welder. And if it's said to predate that era, the component parts and methods used in its manufacture don't stack up.

Kbeitz, I'm very curious about it and wonder why you're so certain it's an early welder?
How 'bout posting another view or two of this rascal?

Good Luck

kbeitz
10-02-2010, 08:12 AM
I found this unit in an old fallen down chicken barn...
It has old weld leads that i found with it...
I welded 1/4" steel plate with it with no problem.
I dont use it for fear I might destroy the oldest welder known to man...
It runs so smooth but the arc wants to keep going as you pull the rod away...

denrep
10-02-2010, 10:54 AM
If I had to ID this with what I've seen so far, I'd put my money on it being an electroplating transformer or maybe a battery charger.

I don't believe it's a stand-alone device but rather a sub-assembly that was gutted from a larger machine. My guess is that a resourceful chicken farmer improvised a welding machine.

Why a sub assembly? Even very early stand-alone electrical products were equipped with protective enclosures, labeling, and other safety refinements.

Why not a welder? A few reasons, but mostly because there would be no sense in having so many current taps with a welder of such limited range; whereas battery charging and electroplating both require minute current adjustments.

That's my best guess, I'm open to hearing other opinions.

Kbeitz - What diameter electrode will she burn?
How ‘bout a look at the leads and another view or two of the machine?

Good Luck

daviddwilson
10-03-2010, 09:42 PM
I have an old Forney stick welder too. I imagine it would date back to the 50's or very early 60's. Old enough to still have jacks for carbon arc , brazing and battery charging.

My stick welder is a Hobart T180 I got from my dad. I have tried to get info on it without success.

kbeitz
10-07-2010, 08:49 PM
If I had to ID this with what I've seen so far, I'd put my money on it being an electroplating transformer or maybe a battery charger.

I don't believe it's a stand-alone device but rather a sub-assembly that was gutted from a larger machine. My guess is that a resourceful chicken farmer improvised a welding machine.

Why a sub assembly? Even very early stand-alone electrical products were equipped with protective enclosures, labeling, and other safety refinements.

Why not a welder? A few reasons, but mostly because there would be no sense in having so many current taps with a welder of such limited range; whereas battery charging and electroplating both require minute current adjustments.

That's my best guess, I'm open to hearing other opinions.

Kbeitz - What diameter electrode will she burn?
How ‘bout a look at the leads and another view or two of the machine?

Good Luck

1/8 6013's with no problem... But you need to wipp the rod away from the work or the arc will follow you...

kbeitz
10-07-2010, 09:07 PM
Tell me what part you want me to take a picture of...

http://user.pa.net/~kbeitz/Post-em/Welder%20connections.JPG

http://user.pa.net/~kbeitz/Post-em/Welder%20front%20view.JPG

http://user.pa.net/~kbeitz/Post-em/Welder%20plugins%20side%20view.JPG

http://user.pa.net/~kbeitz/Post-em/DC%20recitifer%20bulb.JPG

kbeitz
10-08-2010, 08:42 PM
http://user.pa.net/~kbeitz/Post-em/Welder%20weight%20&%20size.JPG

http://user.pa.net/~kbeitz/Post-em/Welder%20weight.JPG

http://user.pa.net/~kbeitz/Post-em/Welder%20Size.JPG

onionring
10-17-2010, 04:52 PM
This old 295 amp Craftsman....have to get it wired up first..not sure how to do it...heavy as hell...weighs in a 270 lbs..

Oldiron2
10-17-2010, 06:07 PM
This old 295 amp Craftsman....have to get it wired up first..not sure how to do it...heavy as hell...weighs in a 270 lbs..

I don't know if you want any parts, but just for your interest, here's a breakdown of it:


http://www.searspartsdirect.com/partsdirect/part-model/Craftsman-Parts/Welder-Parts/Model-11320190/0247/0753000/00023807/00001?blt=06&prst=&shdMod=

yorkiepap
10-17-2010, 07:21 PM
Hey guys,
My oldest welder I use daily is the one I see in the mirror every morning......takes a lickin'....keeps on tickin'. Vintage circa 1943..... got Jim Colt by a few. He11, I even got SundownIII by a few.

Anyway, I had an 'ol Lincoln buzzbox from my uncle that was '55 era. Sold it a couple years ago. Most of my older stuff is '70-'90.....still work great.

Here's a pic taken last summer with my twin grandsons that I finally got to meet. They live in Calif.

Denny

onionring
10-17-2010, 07:40 PM
I don't know if you want any parts, but just for your interest, here's a breakdown of it:


http://www.searspartsdirect.com/partsdirect/part-model/Craftsman-Parts/Welder-Parts/Model-11320190/0247/0753000/00023807/00001?blt=06&prst=&shdMod=



Oldiron2...nice find..looks like I need that outlet box attached to the back of the welder...I can see it in the parts list...I'm glad I kept it...I bet you must attach the ground wire to it...anyways I think I will call an electrician and have him connect the thing up for me...the guy that gave it to told me it was working....

ROBZ71LM7
10-19-2010, 11:41 PM
No idea how old but it's at an old 1920's hydroelectric plant and still in use.

kromewldr
10-22-2010, 10:46 PM
got a 47, and a 53 short hood sa-200, both run smooth as silk, bought em in a barn, sight un-seen for pennies of what they are worth. i wont be taking them out on the pipeline but gonna paint them up pretty and keep them in the shop. i think they have earned that!

richajohnson
02-09-2011, 08:00 PM
I have Smith's from the 40's ? It's a big round unit that tops out at 250 amps

SMITH'S WELDING EQUIP CORP
MINNEAPOLIS MINN.
25-18
SER 25-18154

It's a gess at the age of the great welder. Any body know anything about it?

bruland
I just got one from my grandfather. looking for info on it. i think his is from the 40s same model as yours

Alphonse
02-13-2011, 06:04 PM
I have a MIDSTATES 300amp industrial AC welder Runs like a champ and will run hard to run E7018's. E6012's that require 80 OCV/ 30 arc volts. These were made about 1955- 1962. Mine is circa 1959-60. I can run big 3/16-1/4" E7018's. that other AC welders can't even strike up an arc with!

GBM
02-13-2011, 06:52 PM
I have a Miller 250 amp Heliarc , L 201, serial number 24975 , which I can not determine how old it is..
Has a crank handle at the top....had a water cooling pump and a huge tig head.. I switched to a gas cooled... anyone know if I am close to having a real antique ?
I had guessed it was pre or close to WW2 era..

sooeey2u
02-15-2011, 01:12 PM
I'm 61.... <snort>

farmer37
02-17-2011, 07:13 AM
Thats a Tungar bulb battery charger,The bulbs are rectifiers and they are connected to the ac line.

farmer37
02-17-2011, 07:40 AM
Battery charger, each bulb is rated a 6 amps.The case is missing.I have one in working order.I have a welder my dad bought in a scrap yard for 10 bucks in the mid 50s Label says Weld Master Boston Mass.208 volt input 150 amp out put,Wound with cotton covered wire.Hi and Low out put terminals.I built a cart for it and screened the bottom to keep critters out.I do most of my welding with it.I have a Lincoln 225 for bigger jobs.The poor condition of old welders front panels prove the welders should be covered when idle.

denrep
02-18-2011, 12:10 AM
Thats a Tungar bulb battery charger,The bulbs are rectifiers and they are connected to the ac line.


Battery charger, each bulb is rated a 6 amps.The case is missing.I have one in working order. . . .

Farmer37,
I presume you mean reply #180?
Yours is the identical model? :eek:
Interesting.

But with just 18 amps total output (if it's 6 amps output per rectumfryer tube) I wonder how Kbeitz would be getting any sort of decent electrode burn? Maybe high secondary voltage? What sort of battery voltage charging rate is yours spec'd at?

Good Luck

kidd4x4
03-10-2011, 11:07 PM
how would a dc welder supply and run a ac component?

nadogail
03-11-2011, 01:48 AM
"how would a dc welder supply and run a ac component? "

The AC component is ripple from incomplete filtration after the rectifiication.

Retification does not give you pure DC, but pulsating DC. Typically a network of capacitors and inductors is used to make a filter.Filtration smooths the pulses somewhat, the better the filtration the smoother the DC.

The AC componet gets less as the filtration is improved.

aarcwelding
03-11-2011, 04:03 PM
I have a 74 lincoln 400 with a perkins and rebuilt generator,my new welder is an 81 400 with a bedford,they make 1\4 7018 sing and thrive on 1\2 arcair,1\2 arcair makes them bark!!!Would nt trade them for anything

cody_mnweldor
03-29-2011, 05:27 PM
1953 Lincoln 200SA :D i thought it was a good deal at $300, welds like a dream

kcmillwright1529
03-29-2011, 10:46 PM
Hello everyone my oldest welders are a 1953 sa200 with a mercury switch for the Idle advance pick up, This is the gray machine, and the other one is a 1955 lincoln sa200
Both are excellence machines. I have a lincoln 180 amp DC welder hand crank Wisconsin engine, You have to set the engine speed to desired amps for welding, and you have three
amp settings that you plug in for amp range, But I do not know what year it is,

Bluewelders
04-07-2011, 10:00 PM
Sorry,this was originally red,have no idea about any other details.
Anyone recognize it ?

brslk
04-07-2011, 11:12 PM
Sorry,this was originally red,have no idea about any other details.
Anyone recognize it ?

No, but is that a Forney beside it?

Bluewelders
04-08-2011, 12:00 AM
Yeah,good eye.

4sfed
04-08-2011, 04:08 PM
.
Not mine, but used by a local shop on a nearly daily basis. It was purchased in 1942 for the War Effort . . .

.
http://www.autocomponenti.com/welding/welder0413s.jpg

eman
04-08-2011, 04:40 PM
Just curious what kinda older machines some of you guys on here might be still using today? My buddy just sold a millermatic 35(not positive on the model) that he bought 18 years ago at auction for 500 bux he said. It was pretty well used when he bought it then too. He got 500 out of it when he sold it too lol....pretty good investment. I know the millermatic 200's are supposed to be great machines to get used if you can find em.

I have a wards welder I believe was made by dayton. Its a 235 amp ac 180 amp dc stick welder and I bought it new about 35 years ago and it still works like the day I bought it.

trancher
07-01-2011, 04:12 AM
Hey Guys - we're looking for any information on a very old looking 'Erickson' Welder. Manufactured by Lewis & Erickson - Rockford Illinois. Model 300 - Serial No. 2096 (or 2098) - Cat. No. 24222 - 60 amp,
2 pole and 250 volts. We can post photo's - weighs probably 200-300 lbs. Someone offered us $50.00,
but we're not sure if that's just giving it away or a good deal. Thanks for any information you can give us.
69481

mudbugone
07-01-2011, 04:26 AM
I have no info on that machine other than it's probably copper wrapped and 300# you do the math.... It's worth a lot more than $50 as scrap alone.

I'd hate to see an antique welder get scrapped out though... Mines ugly and has a wood case and I wouldn't take $50 for it either.... just because it works and it's old .

It's hard to determine value from a name & weight. Post a few pictures and someone may be able to ID it or even offer you more for it if they are close to your location.

millman52
07-01-2011, 08:32 AM
I agree with mud bug There is more than $50.00 scrap copper value in the leads alone.

denrep
07-01-2011, 09:57 AM
It'd be a shame to see #213 -or any of these- go to scrap, and whoever offered $50 probably has that in mind.

Okay... so who wants to start a welder museum?
Without crashing the thread, I'd like to mention that after all, the 8-track museum already opened last year.
http://www.eighttrackmuseum.org/home.html

Good Luck

farmall
07-01-2011, 10:30 AM
Neat old oil-cooled welder. Should last forever.

mudbugone
07-01-2011, 10:37 AM
Well ..Now that I see it I'd offer $50 for the dang leads alone. Where are you located?

This thread has become a welder museum of sorts online ,at least for the members and I suppose anyone else that goes looking for information on old welders. I suspect that's how the OP found his way here.

Back to the Welder... Pretty interesting machine,I've not seen one like it before and it looks like it probably still works if the good condition of the leads is any indication. I like mechanical do-dads and that one has all sorts of levers & wheels added to make it visually interesting. It's not just a square box with two leads coming out of it. Looks like you change amps by physically changing lead connections on the top and then fine tune it with the wheel at the top.

Let us know what you do with it....It would be a shame if some money grubber tore it up for a few bucks of copper.... Real Ghetto ...IMHO... There's plenty of junk out there without destroying history.

Who wants to venture a guess as to age ? 30's ...40's... I doubt it's newer than that.

Thanks for sharing the picture of it with us and any more if you care to.

Oldiron2
07-01-2011, 12:20 PM
Hey Guys - we're looking for any information on a very old looking 'Erickson' Welder. Manufactured by Lewis & Erickson - Rockford Illinois. Model 300 - Serial No. 2096 (or 2098) - Cat. No. 24222 - 60 amp,
2 pole and 250 volts. We can post photo's - weighs probably 200-300 lbs. Someone offered us $50.00,
but we're not sure if that's just giving it away or a good deal. Thanks for any information you can give us.
69481

You might try calling the Library in Rockford, Ill. and asking a reference librarian to look for any information they have on the company. Call city hall and ask if they have any town history. I have no idea how large a place it is or how close to another larger city, but Illinois did have lots of manufacturing once. Do they anymore??

Could also do a patent search, although with no more to go on than stated, that might be quite a task. Ask the librarian about how to do that too, or ask if she could try for you?

Something like your machine would, in the older days, have been valued by many Local Welding Shops as a working "decoration" to have in their showroom, something to draw attention and talk about. May still be some shops like that near you, wherever that is.

jughead
07-01-2011, 12:52 PM
i have one that looks like the holip in a previous post.had the sheet metal off of it several years ago and couldnt find a name of any kind. still welds better than this old man can. supposedly was used on the alaska pipeline. i added a 300 amp penneys dc converter to it and have been using it for about 15 years without a problem.

mudbugone
07-01-2011, 01:42 PM
I'm not so great at adding photos,but I ran across this last night..

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=160609034482&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT

If someone knows how to embed the photos to this thread Please do so. I've never seen that particular machine before and it's unusual. Just thought it should be included in our Virtual Museum....besides someone close might want to purchase it.

papaharley03
07-01-2011, 01:50 PM
I'm not so great at adding photos,but I ran across this last night..

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=160609034482&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT

If someone knows how to embed the photos to this thread Please do so. I've never seen that particular machine before and it unusual. Just thought it should be included in our Virtual Museum....besides someone close might want to purchase it.

Side note. Down below and to the left, you'll see a posting rules box. The term BB code is a link you can click on. It will show you how to do all that tricky stuff, like imbedding photos, etc.

This is a great thread, and it's amazing to see these old machines still getting it done.

papaharley03
07-01-2011, 02:26 PM
Just saw this old 3 phase beast on eBay.

http://cgi.ebay.com/LINCOLN-ARC-WELDER-3-PHASE-MODEL-3673-/110103320078?pt=BI_Welders&hash=item19a2ab560e

trancher
07-01-2011, 04:02 PM
Here are a couple more photo's of this welder. It's located in Dubuque, IA. Left in the garage by a past owner. I'm located in Northern CA - and rec'd an email from friends asking if we knew anything about this welder. (I worked with kindergartner's! and now raise cows! I don't know anything!) I did however Google it's name - and found you guys! What better way to gain information - than go to the source of knowledge! You Guys are Great! We appreciate all interest, information and suggestions. Thanks so much. Nancy
Oh, and sorry for the photo's being so large! It's how I rec'd 'em.....and I'm doing really good to even be able to post here! Please let me know if I should delete them - because of taking up too much space.

mudbugone
07-01-2011, 04:15 PM
Thanks for the additional photos.... Great machine.

These are a few similar machines.

http://cgi.ebay.com/VINTAGE-LINCOLN-SHIELD-WELDER-200-AMPERE-/200618336713?pt=BI_Welders&hash=item2eb5c8e1c9

http://cgi.ebay.com/Marquette-Vintage-Instant-ARC-Welder-/150624458922?pt=BI_Welders&hash=item2311ead8aa

Just to give perspective of value... I'd rather have the machine you posted than both the others... I've not seen one before and like I said the leads are worth the $50 that was offered.

Because I went looking into this machine I found a really cool small antique welder I'll probably buy... You never know where a thread will wind up !

Oldiron2
07-01-2011, 04:27 PM
Here are a couple more photo's of this welder. It's located in Dubuque, IA. Left in the garage by a past owner. I'm located in Northern CA - and rec'd an email from friends asking if we knew anything about this welder. (I worked with kindergartner's! and now raise cows! I don't know anything!) I did however Google it's name - and found you guys! What better way to gain information - than go to the source of knowledge! You Guys are Great! We appreciate all interest, information and suggestions. Thanks so much. Nancy
Oh, and sorry for the photo's being so large! It's how I rec'd 'em.....and I'm doing really good to even be able to post here! Please let me know if I should delete them - because of taking up too much space.

Your photos are fine. When they are too large, they cut off the text of a post so make it unintelligible.
These threads are just for the purpose of spreading information about these old machines and procedures so your pictures "need" to be here!
If you like this thread, take a look at this one below (which was a compilation of two different ones) starting from the beginning and when you have an hour or two to spare:


Old Welding-Related Pictures (http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?t=23328)

trancher
07-01-2011, 04:37 PM
Thanks mudbug for the ebay leads. I checked those out - and will pass along the information. As luck would have it - my husband has an old arc welder - Ranch Rite - stored for years, never used - so for the past few months it's been in the pile of scrap metal! Ouch! Maybe we should have been doing some research for ourselves!

mudbugone
07-01-2011, 05:02 PM
Ranch Rite is most likely a re-badged machine from a Hardware chain in Colorado... Don't know who the original manufacturer might be.

You originally wanted a value on that old machine... $50 is way too low... The leads alone would bring that on Ebay.

To Joe-blow on the street the machine might bring $100 to $200 as a functional welder more to a collector or on Ebay where you never know what it might go for.

I'm not a collector,I just appreciate old machines and that one is pretty niffty. Tell your friends to learn how to weld... They already have the welder ,for a few bucks more they might pick up a new hobby and be able to build some things they want or need... It's addictive.

trancher
07-01-2011, 05:50 PM
Your suggestion of learning how to weld....that's a Great idea! Either one might find enjoyment in it.
Re: the old Ranch Rite - I'll have to venture down to the scrap pile and see what other information I can find. Just hopefully no snakes!

Mudbugone - You're the Best! Can't thank you enough for your time and energy and helpful information.
Happy and Safe 4th of July!

trancher
07-02-2011, 12:35 AM
Oldiron2, you and mudbugone are Awesome! I just finished looking at the wonderful photo's of yester-years welders. Believe it or not, I know that in with my dad's tools-etc. are a couple of pair of those welders glasses! They're way cool!
Thanks for your suggestion of contacting Rockford's library or Chamber.....great ideas. It'll be interesting to see what these kids do with the welder.
Thanks Again, and hope you have a Fun & Safe 4th of July. NT

mudbugone
07-02-2011, 01:32 AM
Glad you are enjoying the site and Happy we could answer some questions for you. I hope your friends decide to try to use that machine instead of letting it go.... There's no telling what it may have built in it's day and I'm sure it's still got some life left.

My old wooden cased AC welder is so smooth it's hard to tell it's even on...until you start welding and even then you can't hear anything except the crackle of the welding rod...not the machine.

Have your friends look around this site... they might catch the bug..LOL.:laugh:

You have a fun & safe 4th also

insterno
07-02-2011, 05:37 PM
Wow, and I thought my work had old welders! Granted, they probably have more hours on them than welders ten times their age.....

mudbugone
07-06-2011, 10:50 AM
Like I said earlier I ran across an interesting welder while looking for information about the one posted above.

I couldn't resist the temptation to purchase it... What the heck it was only $50 and I've wasted more than that on beer before..LOL

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=320722042650&viewitem=&sspagename=ADME%3AL%3AOC%3AMOTORS%3A1123

What's that they say---"The only difference between Men & Boys , Is the price of their toys "

CharleyL
07-06-2011, 12:55 PM
Mudbugone,

My uncle had one of those welders, and I inherited it last year, because my cousin knew that we were weldors, but my uncle had not treated it very well and the case was destroyed on it. I don't know why my cousin saved it for me, but he did. It was quite obvious that the only output that my uncle had ever used was the max as the connector had gone bad and he had just made the hole in the panel bigger and spliced his lead direct to the output winding inside. I brought the welder home (to be polite), but threw it in the recycle copper bin at the shop. It may still be there.

Charley

mudbugone
07-06-2011, 01:15 PM
I bought it because it is interesting and seems to be in pretty fair condition. I like strange antique machines/equipment... LOL..Someone needs to save them and I enjoy the oddity of them. I think it probably still works although it probably isn't all that useful.

I'll remember you might still have yours in case this one has issues that might need parts..LOL

You ought to see the "Drag Saw" I bought... I thought it was a plow or something... I bought it because I'd never seen one and had no idea what the heck it was.... I found out it was an original 'chainsaw' contraption complete with it's strange gas engine that looks like a Maytag engine.

Similar to this...

http://video.search.yahoo.com/video/play?ei=UTF-8&fr2=tab-img&p=Drag+Saw&vid=1018704232986&dt=1289462400&l=105&turl=http%3A%2F%2Fts3.mm.bing.net%2Fvideos%2Fthumb nail.aspx%3Fq%3D1018704232986%26id%3Ddafec68d54533 8510bb6fde6b130b474%26bid%3DWpsV8eIuuHsO0Q%26bn%3D Thumb%26url%3Dhttp%253a%252f%252fwww.youtube.com%2 52fwatch%253fv%253d65dsm6h_2ko&rurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fv%2F65dsm6h_2k o%26autoplay%3D1&tit=Wade+drag+saw&sigr=11f1502c9&newfp=1&surl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D65 dsm6h_2ko&sigs=11a6fru0s

LawsonWeldingLLC
07-10-2011, 11:26 PM
1955 gold star tig.

Baron1710
07-13-2011, 12:21 AM
Not sure how old this welder is but it has a wood box. I bought it along with some other equipment from a lady who's father had passed away. I have never seen anything like it but it still works great.

It was manufactured in San Francisco by Weldco I am including pictures of it.

Would like to know if anyone knows anything about this welder.

mudbugone
07-13-2011, 05:25 AM
Excellent old welder...It looks to be almost as old as the one I have. I found these pics of a Weldco welder,although I think it's a newer model than your wood cased one..

http://www.compusos.com/havewelder/weldco/

found here in a discussion about a similar Birdsell welder

http://stickweld.com/interesting-stuff/an-antique-birdsell-welder/

Your Weldco has a top out of something like soapstone or a slate like material doesn't it ?

I've been researching old welders for several years and yours comes closer to the age of the Omaha AC welder I have than anything else I've seen online. I'm pretty sure mine dates back to the teens or 20's. The only other example of similar design I found was in a museum and it was from the late 20's and had plug-in connectors like newer machines do.

From the looks of your Weldco I'd think it's probably as old as the Omaha I have maybe a tad newer since yours has control levers in the top while mine required actual moving of the connections to change amperages.Mine weighs 3-400# and there are pictures of it earlier in this thread.

There are several "Weldco" companies although I doubt they have any relation to your machine which was probably manufactured by a San Francisco company that no longer exists. One of the current Weldco companies might like to have your machine though as it would make a great conversation piece for their corporate offices.

That's a great looking machine and looks like it is/was still in use. I use mine some although I'm working on restoring it,but it still welds silently and seems to still be a strong machine.

Don't know your intentions for it ,but it's an oldie & a goodie... Please refrain from scrapping it... It should still be a totally functional welder,but judging by it's apparent age it's probably more valuable to someone that appreciates old machinery or even as a museum piece.

Thanks for sharing the pictures of it with us and adding it to the growing online repository here about old welders. I've been all over the internet and this thread has more old welders shown than anywhere else I've looked.

Baron1710
07-13-2011, 09:49 AM
Excellent old welder...It looks to be almost as old as the one I have. I found these pics of a Weldco welder,although I think it's a newer model than your wood cased one..

http://www.compusos.com/havewelder/weldco/

found here in a discussion about a similar Birdsell welder

http://stickweld.com/interesting-stuff/an-antique-birdsell-welder/

Your Weldco has a top out of something like soapstone or a slate like material doesn't it ?

I've been researching old welders for several years and yours comes closer to the age of the Omaha AC welder I have than anything else I've seen online. I'm pretty sure mine dates back to the teens or 20's. The only other example of similar design I found was in a museum and it was from the late 20's and had plug-in connectors like newer machines do.

From the looks of your Weldco I'd think it's probably as old as the Omaha I have maybe a tad newer since yours has control levers in the top while mine required actual moving of the connections to change amperages.Mine weighs 3-400# and there are pictures of it earlier in this thread.

There are several "Weldco" companies although I doubt they have any relation to your machine which was probably manufactured by a San Francisco company that no longer exists. One of the current Weldco companies might like to have your machine though as it would make a great conversation piece for their corporate offices.

That's a great looking machine and looks like it is/was still in use. I use mine some although I'm working on restoring it,but it still welds silently and seems to still be a strong machine.

Don't know your intentions for it ,but it's an oldie & a goodie... Please refrain from scrapping it... It should still be a totally functional welder,but judging by it's apparent age it's probably more valuable to someone that appreciates old machinery or even as a museum piece.

Thanks for sharing the pictures of it with us and adding it to the growing online repository here about old welders. I've been all over the internet and this thread has more old welders shown than anywhere else I've looked.

This welder was still plugged in when I picked it up. Not sure what it weighs but am guessing it is somewhere north of 400 lbs. Had it wired up in my shop over the weekend going to play with it some as time allows.

Thanks for the info.

millman52
07-13-2011, 07:20 PM
I love the ser# at 390. Wonder if they started at 001.

Don't have a clue of how old it might be, but it certainly is an early edition of that particular machine...

nwood1982
07-14-2011, 04:30 PM
Mudbugone said I might try this thread, and see if anyone here might be able to help.

When out sifting garage sales this last weekend, I picked up this welder for $1. Don't really know anything about it. I'm hoping someone can give me a hint, or at least point me in the right direction.

It is almost completely devoid of markings, just marks on individual parts: "to raise", "gage," that kind of thing. I can't find any name brands. It's dusty, a bit rusty, but still seems pretty solid. The original finish looks like a flat gray, possibly with yellow markings. It weighs probably well over 200 pounds, it's a beast.

djr
07-15-2011, 01:32 AM
New to post, Ive go tan old Dial amp stick welder Internal frame is made out of 2x2 oak Also have a millermatic 35 but it has developed some problems. Wire speed slow and arch doesnt sound wright thinking the diodes?

mudbugone
07-17-2011, 10:33 PM
Thought I'd add a couple of pics of the little antique AC welder I bought on Ebay for the record and include that I tried it today and it welds pretty good considering it's size. (notice the dollar bill for scale )

nadogail
07-18-2011, 02:41 AM
Dynamic Welder Info.. http://stickweld.com/welding-machines/the-dynamic-heavy-duty-industrial-welder/

mudbugone
07-18-2011, 04:19 AM
I Thank You for that information. That's just great to have. I'll print those ads to go along with my "new" little cracker box welder..LOL

I intended to get a new plug wire to replace the existing one and keep it on my workbench for handy use. It weighs about 25# and even though it's so small it really does weld well. It had a crisp AC "cracker box" characteristic to it and was surprisingly 'hot'.

I've never seen anything quite like it before and I was a bit cautious about buying it unseen,but It's actually better than I expected and your ads give it an additional interest.

I'm sure I didn't need this,but I'm sure glad I bought it now. I figure if you're going to weld and are interested in it...You ought to own & restore at least one obsolete machine just for the preservation of them.... Scrapping one never enters my mind and I have several now.

Tri County Welder
07-18-2011, 10:00 PM
Hey nwood that welder may be a westinghouse. The body looks the same as the one I have except for the dial on top. The one I have has the multiport holes for the leads. Mine is a 300 amp ac machine and it burns hot. The rod will continue to burn when its about 2" away from the metal.

Dutch51
07-22-2011, 05:16 AM
Don't know the vintage of this 20th Century a/c welder. It's 180 amp and puts down nice beads with Lincoln 7018ac 1/8" rod.

I got if from a friend who owns a welding fabrication shop in northeast Oklahoma. I'm in northern California. I put a new 6 ga. power cable on it, 22 feet, 55 amp. My shop is primarily metal machining. I have Smith oxy-acetylene torches but didn't have any arc capability.

http://images58.fotki.com/v696/photos/4/28344/9161136/DSCF2357-vi.jpg
http://images57.fotki.com/v81/photos/4/28344/9161136/DSCF2363-vi.jpg
http://images16.fotki.com/v316/photos/4/28344/9161136/DSCF2364-vi.jpg
http://images49.fotki.com/v1555/photos/4/28344/9161136/DSCF2542np-vi.jpg
http://images54.fotki.com/v459/photos/4/28344/9161136/DSCF2519aw-vi.jpg

denrep
07-31-2011, 10:11 AM
This isn't mine and I'm not "still using" it so it doesn't really qualify to run here, but I thought y'all might like to see it anyway.

70889

The pictured Old Welder #1 was priced dirt cheap on Craigslist a few years ago. I had intended to follow up but didn't get to it. Anyway, today I stumbled into the Craigslist pictures so I thought I'd post ‘em here. I hope it found a good home.

Then, Old Welder #2 showed up on Craigslist without a picture. I did go to buy that but was disappointed to find that it was actually electroplating transformer #1, instead of a welder. Oh well, welder or plating transformer, what's the difference. :laugh: So I bought it anyway.

Good Luck

mudbugone
08-01-2011, 05:28 PM
Looks like something from an HG Wells movie... Soooo you building a time machine out of it ?

That thing looks awful heavy ,but I'd probably have bought it too:blob2: You just never see such machines any more.

That 20th Century machine looks like it's in Super condition for it's age..

hbradley
08-09-2011, 10:09 PM
i have an old westinghouse from 1940 or so i think i would have to look still works great but u have to let it warm up;)