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Boostinjdm
04-30-2011, 01:41 AM
Don't get too excited. No pics yet.

I managed to trade some work for materials and would like to start my dozer blade for my Bobcat M-371 this weekend. I'm looking for input on features/size.

My bobcat is currently 34 1/4" wide outside the tires. I am almost done with my 3/4" wheel spacers. So I should end up with 35 3/4" finished width. I measured by laying 2x4s up against the tires and then measuring between them.

I don't want to make the blade too wide because I'm not sure the Bobcat could push it through hard dirt or a pile. I'm thinking 36-38" with bolt on wings for snow use.
I decided not to make it pivot side to side because I think it would just push the Bobcat sideways.
I do however want to have it adjustable forward and back to change the digging angle of the blade without changing the height (I want the arms to be all the way down with all four tires on the ground).
I want to mount tines/scarifiers across the top so when you put the blade face down the points are in the dirt.
I am having trouble deciding how tall to make it. Maybe 14-16" ?
I don't know how much of a curve to give it. Maybe copy an atv blade? My neighbor has one.
Can't decide whether to bolt or weld the cutting edge on. Welding is faster/easier, but I will have to cut it off when replacement time comes. Bolting will require design considerations to be made concerning the bottom edge.
I have 3/16" steel for the moldboard (?) and 3/8"x3" grader blade for the cutting edge.
I have 1/4" steel for the quick attach.
I have DOM and stressproof for the pivots and plenty of 2x3x1/8" or 1x2x1/8" or 1x3x1/8" tubing for the frame.

The Bobcat is very light on the front end. Am I going to have to add weights to the blade for it to dig? How far out from the quick attach do I want it? What am I missing?

I haven't used a blade on a skid steer before so I would appreciate any input from someone that has. The rest of you can chime in too.:laugh:

Sandy
04-30-2011, 01:50 AM
Will it angle? Make it so that at the most severe angle the foot print is just wider than the tires. You'll want it so any dirt being pushed plus sluff back to clear the tires. I' guessing you'll be close to 4 feet?

Boostinjdm
04-30-2011, 03:19 AM
No, it won't angle. I said that in the first post. I don't think this skid loader is big enough or heavy enough on the front end.

Like I said, it won't angle, but if it did I would have to go a minimum of 42" wide. At 42" I could angle it 30 degrees, which seems standard, and it would give me a 36" foot print. I figured that out early on.
I'm trying to nail down specifics now so I can start cutting material.

mrmikey
04-30-2011, 05:58 AM
I do however want to have it adjustable forward and back to change the digging angle of the blade without changing the height (I want the arms to be all the way down with all four tires on the ground).
If you've got the hydraulic circuits no problem, if you want to go the cheap route use an adjustable top link from a 3pt hitch

I want to mount tines/scarifiers across the top so when you put the blade face down the points are in the dirt.
Lost me there

I am having trouble deciding how tall to make it. Maybe 14-16" ?
I'd go higher by another 6", at 14" you're gonna get spoil coming back over

I don't know how much of a curve to give it. Maybe copy an atv blade? My neighbor has one.
An atv blade is a bit too flat, the more curl (within reason) will cause the spoil to curl back on itself rather than go over ythe top

Can't decide whether to bolt or weld the cutting edge on.
Go with bolt, you'll cuss now having to drill holes but not as much later when you have to gouge the old one off later. I never was a fan of welded cutting edges, more prone to breaking off imho

Bolting will require design considerations to be made concerning the bottom edge.
For sure but no biggie, go with a good heavy unequal leg angle, long leg down, that'll give you a good surface to drill and the opposite leg will give you forward/aft strength as well as a surface to weld your framework/attachment to.

I have 3/16" steel for the moldboard (?)
Good, by the time you get that rolled or bent whichever way you go it'll add strength

and 3/8"x3" grader blade for the cutting edge.
seems narrow, you're not ging to have much edge hanging below the actual moldboard

I have 1/4" steel for the quick attach.
sounds ok, depending on the design

I have DOM and stressproof for the pivots
good

and plenty of 2x3x1/8" or 1x2x1/8" or 1x3x1/8" tubing for the frame.
I'd say much too light, minimum 1/4" or more preferably, going that light I'd say you're going to get welds pulling out or bending

The Bobcat is very light on the front end. Am I going to have to add weights to the blade for it to dig?
Doesn't have power down or you're concerned the machine lifting up?

How far out from the quick attach do I want it?
As close as practical

What am I missing?
If your luck is like mine, probably a heck of a lot LOL

The rest of you can chime in too.
Smart a$$ :laugh: .
I'd go look at a manufactured one and get some ideas....Mike

daddy
04-30-2011, 06:44 AM
I think ultimately, you will be limited by how light of a machine you have. What I mean is, don't expect too much out of it, especially in hard material.

The bolt on cutting edge is the best way to go, but it does depend on how much use it will see. If you just tinker around with it, and push some snow, it may not be worth the hassle. At work, my guys can have one (on a bucket) ground down to nothing in a month, if we are working full tilt.(milled asphalt surface) For us,bolt on is the only way to fly.:laugh:

I know you have ruled out the angle, but as an operator, I think that is one of the best features of a blade... I know, it's a little skid. I'd consider a strong center pivot, and a pinnable link for angle. You don't have to use it, but you might really like it...dunno...

Isn't the forward/back adjustment just a function of how much or little you curl? Maybe I don't read you right. I would set it so that when you are curled all the way back, the cutting edge is layed back pretty far, and then "dump" the blade to your preferred angle of attack.

For strength, mount should be as close as reasonable, I think you may have to wait and see on the weight. There is a reason that dozers are big and heavy.(Refer back to my first comment:laugh:)

Good luck, and keep us posted.:drinkup:

gwiley
04-30-2011, 08:07 AM
I use my Bobcat to plow 2 miles of gravel road for snow with and without the angle it would be far less useful. I had trouble with pushing until I added chains to the rear wheels - made it a whole new machine. You may be correct in not angling for dirt, but for snow it is a MUST have.

To setup the angle you just want to use a hitch pin through a semi-cicle behind the blade - manual adjustments keep it simple but strong enough to survive.

For the cutting edge, you might consider hard surfacing a mild steel edge since the machine is small. If you are not using it for extensive ground contact you might get away with it - if it wears to fast you can always add a hardened edge. When you do that I recommend bolts - this machine is not likely to develop enough force to sheer them.

Plan on adding plastic to the top to deflect snow and prevent it from running over the top of the blade. Landscape plastic works great, is cheap and replaceable - just bolt it on.

The blade needs to be slick for snow - especially for lighter machines. You will want to have a smooth surface to let it slide off - otherwise you end up dragging a bunch of caked on ice (been there).

You will need to be able to weight the blade down if you want to cut surface ice, otherwise it will just skip.

For snow plowing you also really MUST be able to tilt the blade to adjust the angle of attack. This is where the skid steer shines over truck mounted plows - the combination of easily adjusting height and angle of attack while I plow makes it possible to clear gravel drives with little to no damage to the gravel. Trucks tend to push a lot of gravel off with the snow.

mla2ofus
04-30-2011, 08:18 AM
As far as moving dirt I'd build it like a U-dozer. I think a straight blade moving dirt will tend to make a lot of "corduroy" which can get awfully frustrating. I don't recall ever seeing a dozer on a bobcat, probably for this reason.
Mike

tbone550
04-30-2011, 09:24 AM
They do make dozer blades for skid-steers, and I've done repairs to a couple of Thomas brand ones because they broke out the brackets for the adjustable top link while being used at high-speed as a snow-plow and hitting something solid like a curb.

According to my customer who owns these, I think you'll be underwhelmed at the amount of work it'll be able to do. Even pushing brush piles around can be dicey because of how close the operator is to the blade. Smoothing a gravel road as long as the material is all loose, is about as much as it'll do. You'll probably be backdragging for that anyway, and a bucket would be just as good.

It would be a fun project though. I'd probably make one myself if I had the machine, just because I could.

RancherBill
04-30-2011, 10:06 AM
Angling is a 'must have' feature. It makes snow clearing much easier.

The other thing is the blade must be on some sort of trip spring system. I clear snow in the winter and the company has lots of equipment. I was using a regular bucket one day and hit a concrete joint. I stomach was sore for 2 days where the operator bar hit my gut. I hit another joint one day with the angle blade and it just folded under and nothing really happened. We use Kwik-Way (http://www.kwmanufacturing.com/prod_doz.htm) at work.

flatbustedbroke
04-30-2011, 12:32 PM
Check out the mini-excavators as they have a small dozer blade to push the dirt back in after digging a trench. This blade rarely gets used for that purpose it does work well to help stabilize the machine.

Boostinjdm
04-30-2011, 01:34 PM
use an adjustable top link from a 3pt hitch
That's what I had in mind.

I'd go higher by another 6", at 14" you're gonna get spoil coming back over
I'm not sure the skid will push that much dirt. Snow maybe.

An atv blade is a bit too flat, the more curl (within reason) will cause the spoil to curl back on itself rather than go over ythe top
OK

For sure but no biggie, go with a good heavy unequal leg angle, long leg down, that'll give you a good surface to drill and the opposite leg will give you forward/aft strength as well as a surface to weld your framework/attachment to.
I also had that idea last night and even have a piece of angle I think will work.

Good, by the time you get that rolled or bent whichever way you go it'll add strength
Going to add ribs too.

seems narrow, you're not ging to have much edge hanging below the actual moldboard
About 1 1/4" hanging below the unequal length angle

Doesn't have power down or you're concerned the machine lifting up?
The machine is so light I can bounce it and pivot it around by pushing on it. I've done that to square it up on the trailer.

As close as practical
I would think that if it was too close it might skip over a lot. And I thought I read somebody saying that with the blade farther out, you get a flatter graded surface due to the longer footprint. Like a road grader....


I'd go look at a manufactured one and get some ideas....Mike
I have looked at a lot of manufactured ones, but they are all for big machines. I haven't found any for a little one like mine.

BCRD
04-30-2011, 02:22 PM
As close as practical
I would think that if it was too close it might skip over a lot. And I thought I read somebody saying that with the blade farther out, you get a flatter graded surface due to the longer footprint. Like a road grader....

The grader idea works because of the wheels up front, if you don't have those, the "skipping" would be further aggravated by sticking it out further. Put a castoring wheel on the front of a beam (and add weights if desired), and you could do a reasonable job of simulating a grader. But it is no longer a general purpose blade. For general purpose, mount it close. And prepare to be underwhelmed:)

Unless of course, you have low expectations. No expectations, no disappointments...:)

Jason

RancherBill
04-30-2011, 03:11 PM
I have looked at a lot of manufactured ones, but they are all for big machines. I haven't found any for a little one like mine.

Bobcat makes them. I checked the S70 page (http://www.bobcat.com/loaders/models/skidsteer/s70) and looked at the available attachments. The blades you want are there for your size machine. I'd downsize something you can get a good look at. Bobcat does not show every model on their site but angle blades come in 8 sizes. Here is the best pic I can find - It does not make sense doing snow with a track but what the heck.

http://www.bobcat.com/publicadmin/getImage.do?id=16964

tenpins
04-30-2011, 04:13 PM
as a long time equipment operator in the army, I dont think you are going to be able to do genuine dozing with a bobcat - moving stockpiles, knocking down berms, clearing and grubbing, From reading this whole thread, any push work I think you may try and do will be greatly enhanced with a 6 way blade.
Graders can adjust the curl/angle of attack on the blade, but they are no replacement for a genuine dozer.
Make the blade tall enough to keep the spoils from coming over the top. That will jack up any work you are trying to do. Especially if you plan to push into brush piles or trees. I was almost very much no bull**** killed as a young private by pushing into a log pile when the ROPS was off the machine. My hand and the steering brake handles took the brunt of the blow.
The scarifiers are an OK idea. The old army JD 230G had the scarifier in front of the blade. Nowdays seems all the scarifiers are in the back as rippers. Ive never delved into the design change, but I speculate it was for reason.

allfluxedup
04-30-2011, 04:14 PM
Ran out of time to read all the answers to your post, so I apologize for any redundancies......Definately a bolt on wear edge, I'm thinking like a bed knife from a jacobsen f10 gang mower.or similar, that would be about the right size , uses countersunk screws. If you are worried about the bobcat being too light in the front end , ie, blade and bobcat not digging in , maybe a ballast tank across the top of the blade would help. A 3 foot long 6" wide pipe with endcaps welded on and a bung on the top , a drain at the bottom. You could even make it out of pvc and experiment to find the right amount of weight then make a steel tank and weld it on. At least it would be adjustable. Damned twypos suck huh.
Mike

DSW
04-30-2011, 05:20 PM
As close as practical
[B]I would think that if it was too close it might skip over a lot. And I thought I read somebody saying that with the blade farther out, you get a flatter graded surface due to the longer footprint. Like a road grader....



The grader idea works because of the wheels up front, if you don't have those, the "skipping" would be further aggravated by sticking it out further. Put a castoring wheel on the front of a beam (and add weights if desired), and you could do a reasonable job of simulating a grader. But it is no longer a general purpose blade. For general purpose, mount it close. And prepare to be underwhelmed:)



A few rambling thoughts on this...


You'd probably be better off running this like a track loader instead. If the bucket is set up right with teeth you can just "skim" off dirt with the teeth. We had our CAT 941 set up so in "float" it would cut about 2" and run flat. You dig in a bit to start, then kick it into float and just power off the top 2". I wish I could explain it better. For the most part we could do almost as much as you could with a dozer (assuming a qualified operator). Any time we need to cut dirt with a skid steer we bolt on a tooth bar or use a bucket with teeth rather than a straight edge.

I've done a fair amount using the blade on a mid sized excavator. The small excavators however need you to apply a fair amount of down pressure from the machine to have any chance of cutting in medium to hard soil. I'm not sure if you will have enough traction to do this. A counter weight on the blade would probably be a good idea. Sort of like what we used to do to the box scraper on the Kubota.

A box scraper would be another option, and actually might work better. the box scraper usually has tines that can be dropped to loosen up hard material, and the blade/box taht can be used to push/fill. We used to stack 12" block on the top of the box to add more down pressure.

If you want to do snow, I'd simply look for a cheap Meyers blade. Around me they run less than $200 used. Chop off the A arm, shorten the blade, and weld on the QD mount. Plows are designed to trip if you hit something, dozer blades are not. Plumb in the angle cylinders to the bucket with QD's ( we disconnected the roll cylinders and used those fittings to angle the blade) Most of the parking lot guys using skid steers are using old plow blades rather than dozer type blades to move snow.

Boostinjdm
04-30-2011, 07:16 PM
I thought I would try to make myself clear here. I don't want you guys thinking I've got unreasonable expectations.

I will not be doing hard work like rolling up established sod. I mostly want the blade for loose material like fresh gravel, dirt, etc. and snow.
I will not be plowing long lanes. All three of my drives are less than 50'x20'.
By skipping, I meant mostly during start and stops. My bobcat is driven by clutches not a hydrostat. It gets extremely jumpy without a bucket and only marginally better with a bucket. Placing the blade out a little farther (maybe 12" from quick attach to moldboard) might help with that as opposed to having it mounted directly to the quick attach.
I've got at least two side dumps worth of gravel I would like to spread this week. That will be the blades first job. I can spread and back drag with the bucket pretty well, but when set up on edge the bucket flexes and gives me a washboard effect. I'm hoping a dozer type blade would fix that.

mla2ofus
04-30-2011, 09:20 PM
I don't like to sound negative, Boost, but I think that's going to be a real challenge spreading gravel w/ a dozer on the bobcat. It's going to be difficult controlling the corduroy or as some catskinners call it, "heartbeats".
Mike

Vince_o
04-30-2011, 11:10 PM
Hears my .02 worth. When I worked for cat I used a 287 with a dozer blad a few times. I loved it! But I had to keep in mind is wasnt a dozer. Im used to 9 and 10's from when I lived in coal country, so the skid steer was a real chalange for me, with the short tracks and running by the seat of your pants. I was VERY impressed with the way it worked once I got used to it. I cut several slot ditches about 3 ft deep and maybe 30 ft long in this hard red clay down here. I still liked a bucket better than a blade.

Im wondering why your bucket is flexing, too thin? I use a tooth bucket for everyting. I often hear people say you cant clean asphault up with a tooth bucket. Thats cause they dont have any operatios. I can run equipment like you guys can run a bead, with your eyes closed.

If I built a blade Id wanna have it angle, even if it were like the old g modle 7's that you had to do manualy. Good luck and post us some pics no mater what you do.

homegrownrmk
05-01-2011, 12:49 AM
Got to agree with the other operators. When spreading dirt with skidsteers, buckets will walk all over the blades. I also had a chance to demo a blade on a cat 277B, working base grade for an apartment complex parking lot. It lasted less than a day, went right back to the bucket. I didn't even want to try to get the hang of it. When pushing and spreading dirt with skidsteers, you can use the weight of the material in the bucket to apply down pressure on the tires increasing traction while still maintaining grade. Putting a blade on, you will lose that ability. Track driven skids like the cats don't suffer as bad, but you'll be spinning holes with tires. Now about plowing snow, build a blade, or modify one from an atv. As long as it angles left or right, you can windrow the snow off.

soutthpaw
05-01-2011, 01:08 AM
the machine you are using is way too light to do any kind of dozering. .. bigger machines with steel tracks (I had an 863 with Logering tracks) and it did quite well. at minimum u need a blade that is heavy to the some weight on the front. Too bad u are not close to me I have some cut out sections of 2 ft diameter pipe about 4 ft wide and a foot tall 3/8 thick that would make a great blade for your machine...

Boostinjdm
05-01-2011, 02:34 AM
Im wondering why your bucket is flexing, too thin?


Bucket, arms, quick attach. The combination of all three flexing a little causes them to load up and then jump. When I have the cutting edge pointed straight down trying to scrape a bit.
I figure with the dozer blade pushing directly on the chasis (arms all the way down) this part of my problem would go away.

I was looking at my material supply and I think with a very minor design change I can make the blade capable of angling. Prolly bolt it solid in the summer and replace the bolts with hitch pins in the winter.

Would it make you guys happy if I quit calling it a dozer blade and labeled it a super heavy duty, multipurpose, snow plow instead?:)

Boostinjdm
05-01-2011, 02:38 AM
at minimum u need a blade that is heavy to the some weight on the front.

I wanted to go heavier, but couldn't afford it and am limited by the thickness I can bend here at home. The blade will have 2" strengthening ribs on the back. I figure I can enclose them and fill with pea gravel for weight if I have to.

Vince_o
05-01-2011, 08:07 AM
Home grown

Im with you, Rubber tires and lots of weight make for nice holes in the yard. When I was delivering rental equip for cat and hertz, I cant tell you how many people think that they can make a level yard by watching the home and garden channel! And do it all in 30 min with comercials!

DSW
05-01-2011, 08:49 AM
Bucket, arms, quick attach. The combination of all three flexing a little causes them to load up and then jump. When I have the cutting edge pointed straight down trying to scrape a bit.

I figure with the dozer blade pushing directly on the chasis (arms all the way down) this part of my problem would go away.


Sounds like you are grading the wrong way. To spread (scrape) I usually angle the bucket forward at about a 30 deg angle from vertical and back drag. To scrape going forward the bucket angle is very shallow ( less than 15-20 deg from flat) not at 90 deg to the surface. The only time I'm vertical like that is if I have to try and get in tight to a curb and then I quickly readjust the angle as I move away.

Your idea of why the dozer blade would eliminate the flex is why buckets work well cutting the way they do. The difference with a blade vs a bucket is the way they cut. The rolled edge on the blade will try to pull the blade into the dirt sort of like a wedge. The angle of attack will be important and probably difficult to get properly adjusted. There's a huge difference on how my Fisher plows handle dirt/stone drives. The 9' plow has a sharp forward rake to the cutting edge because of all the modifications and repairs done to it before I got the blade. It digs in very fast if the gound is even semi soft.
66703

The 10' Fisher the edge is almost vertical to the ground and won't cut in hardly at all.

66702

The 9' plow scrapes great on concrete asphalt. The 10' plow backdrags better however, because the 9' plow wants to ride up over the snow pile because of the "ramp" shape. It would be a bit differnt if they both didn't float in drag and were fixed like a bucket is.

tenpins
05-01-2011, 11:56 AM
Would it make you guys happy if I quit calling it a dozer blade and labeled it a super heavy duty, multipurpose, snow plow instead?:)

yes. On that note, Ive used some modified plow blades on one bobcat and one case loader in the past with great success. Dishing out the gravel stockpiles is almost exactly what I did with them, and as already mentioned, it took me a few minutes to learn that it wasnt a D8K dozer. Basically I just took smaller bites with the blade - 1/3 of the blade or less.
Apologies for my misunderstanding your plans earlier. Post up some pics when you get it done!

Boostinjdm
05-12-2011, 01:26 AM
It has begun.....

farmshop
05-12-2011, 08:38 AM
Looks good so far. You can always add a ruber flap on top or a expanded metal screen. You are right to want it all the way down for pushing. It is eaiser on pins and bushings. You know your machine some here would have you make it 8' wide with hyd tilt ,angle etc. I like your idea for removable wings for snow. Possbily make at least one angle ahead thant way snow goes to one side not both.

Boostinjdm
05-12-2011, 08:55 AM
I decided to throw in the angle feature even though I don't think the machine will handle it. It will have three settings. Straight, 30 degrees right, and 30 degrees left.

Wiregeek
05-12-2011, 10:43 AM
...hmmm, needs to be wider - about 8 feet...

I kid, I kid. I will be watching this, though, for reference when we get around to putting a dozer blade on my friend's Gehl.

mla2ofus
05-12-2011, 04:51 PM
If it's gonna push snow do you plan on putting some shoes on it?
Mike

forhire
05-12-2011, 06:17 PM
I like how you formed both halves... but you missed a perfect opportunity to justify a wider press brake :laugh:

Looks great.

daddy
05-12-2011, 09:06 PM
I decided to throw in the angle feature even though I don't think the machine will handle it. It will have three settings. Straight, 30 degrees right, and 30 degrees left.

Attaboy.:waving:

Boostinjdm
05-12-2011, 11:02 PM
but you missed a perfect opportunity to justify a wider press brake :laugh:

Looks great.

No, I just need to finish the press to run it. http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?t=34555
Materials for a wider brake have been patiently waiting in the corner for a few years now.


Due to a slight oversight, I either have to accept the fact I can't totally disassemble the blade or redesign. The pin the blade will rotate forward and back on will be about 16" long. The distance between ribs is only 12". Means I have to put the pin in and then weld things together. It will then be trapped. I don't think it will wear out though considering it will be 1-3/8" in diameter and the bushings have over 3/8" wall thickness. The damn pin will prolly outlast me.

farmshop
05-12-2011, 11:08 PM
could always add some grease zerks for good measure.

Boostinjdm
05-12-2011, 11:11 PM
could always add some grease zerks for good measure.

That's a given...

Boostinjdm
05-12-2011, 11:13 PM
If it's gonna push snow do you plan on putting some shoes on it?
Mike

I've been thinking about that too. I think I will make some brackets that bolt on where the wings will mount. That keeps the the main blade "clean". It also gives me the chance to change brackets till I arrive at a good design.

Boostinjdm
05-15-2011, 12:05 AM
I managed to solve my long pin dilemma.
Progress has been slow due to several repair jobs showing up.

farmshop
05-16-2011, 12:02 AM
Two piece pin should work if it doesnt seeze together.

Boostinjdm
05-16-2011, 12:20 AM
Two piece pin should work if it doesnt seeze together.

It's two pieces so I can get it in after painting. Coming out I can always cut it in half and make a replacement. I really didn't need the two halves to be joined, but I get picky sometimes. Been working on the A-frame and angle portion. Not enough to justify pics yet.

dumb as a stump
05-16-2011, 06:46 AM
Just a thought why not step it out a bit to clear the outer tabs instead of 2 piece pin?

Boostinjdm
05-17-2011, 01:44 AM
Just a thought why not step it out a bit to clear the outer tabs instead of 2 piece pin?

If I move it out then the blade will swing as it pivots changing the cutting depth. I wanted the cutting depth to stay as close to constant as possible throughout the adjustment. Plus, I already glued it together...

Boostinjdm
05-17-2011, 01:48 AM
Nothing like going to the trouble of making a drawing, using the DRO to get within half a thou, and then watching the holesaw wobble all over the place. I think I need to make a good arbor for the holesaw, and finish up with a boring head on the next project.

Two and a half hours to draw in CAD, layout with a caliper and scribe, cut out with the jigsaw, set up in the mill, and make some holes.

Mick120
05-17-2011, 02:14 AM
Nothing like going to the trouble of making a drawing, using the DRO to get within half a thou, and then watching the holesaw wobble all over the place. I think I need to make a good arbor for the holesaw, and finish up with a boring head on the next project.

Two and a half hours to draw in CAD, layout with a caliper and scribe, cut out with the jigsaw, set up in the mill, and make some holes.

Maybe a lil CNC plasma table on the way mate....???? :D

Boostinjdm
05-17-2011, 02:24 AM
Maybe a lil CNC plasma table on the way mate....???? :D

It's on the list of tools to get once the mill and lathe are paid for. I almost tried PMing a few members here to get the parts cut. Then figured I will hand make the first set according to my drawings. If everything works out as expected, I've already been asked to build another blade. I can't hand make the parts and keep the price down low enough, so CNC plate work is a must for round number two. I don't want to get ahead of myself though. Got to get this one done first.

DSW
05-17-2011, 06:10 AM
Looks like you caught the table a couple of times. I picked up a few anular cutters for my mill this past winter when I needed to "drill" some 1" holes for the plow rebuild. Absolutely LOVE them compared to hole saws.

kb0thn
05-17-2011, 07:54 AM
Looks like you caught the table a couple of times.

I think those are just the slugs that fell out!

Boostinjdm
05-17-2011, 01:16 PM
I think those are just the slugs that fell out!

Correct. I've got 1" blocks under the plates and watched very carefully.

Boostinjdm
05-17-2011, 01:17 PM
I picked up a few anular cutters for my mill this past winter when I needed to "drill" some 1" holes for the plow rebuild. Absolutely LOVE them compared to hole saws.

I thought about that too, but I already own the holesaws and need a boring head anyways.

Boostinjdm
05-18-2011, 12:09 AM
Made some bushings for those angle plates. No egg shaped pin holes for me....
Faced off to correct length. Cut shoulder to fit holes. Reamed to size. Chamfered. I managed to make all 12 of them in a couple hours and maintained a +/- .002" tolerance on all dimensions except the hole chamfer (eyeballed). Love having the lathe handy.

Boostinjdm
05-25-2011, 02:03 AM
Made a few more holes today. This time I got to use my new hole saw arbor.

Boostinjdm
05-30-2011, 05:11 AM
I think this thing will outlast me.....coin is size of a quarter.

Boostinjdm
06-02-2011, 10:27 PM
A few more pics. Working on the quick attach portion now. Hopefully a design for the upper link will come to me before I get there. I have a few different options. Just have to get more completed so I can better visualize the finished product.

irish fixit
06-02-2011, 10:48 PM
All I can say is nice work. I'm nearly always in to much of a hurry to do my own stuff that nice.

Boostinjdm
06-02-2011, 11:09 PM
It's taken me a long time to realize that doing something right once is faster/cheaper in the long run. I'm almost convinced of it.:D

ed mac
06-02-2011, 11:52 PM
nice work

irish fixit
06-03-2011, 12:00 AM
It's taken me a long time to realize that doing something right once is faster/cheaper in the long run. I'm almost convinced of it.:D

I know the feeling. I do like to do it right but often simply don't have the time or money to do it all right the first time. There's a lot of things I do for temporary solutions that end up lasting forever simply because I can't get back to them.

forhire
06-03-2011, 01:16 AM
Coming along very nicely. Can't wait to see it on the machine :cool:

rustyiron
06-03-2011, 05:53 PM
It's taken me a long time to realize that doing something right once is faster/cheaper in the long run. I'm almost convinced of it.:D

Well you have deffinetly nailed it on your blade. Very thoughtful and through work!:drinkup:

Boostinjdm
06-03-2011, 06:45 PM
Had to buy a new cutting edge today due to a design error. With the 3" edge the pivot plates would not sit level. That would make one end of the blade higher than the other when angled. Replaced it with a 4" edge at twice the price to make everything hunky dory again. That's okay though, I'll save the 3" edge for a bucket I need to build later on.

mla2ofus
06-03-2011, 10:07 PM
Nice lookin' job, Boost!! Hope it works well for ya.
Mike

Vince_o
06-03-2011, 11:44 PM
This is really cool to watch!

Boostinjdm
06-04-2011, 01:37 AM
Some more holes tonight. This time in the cutting edge. I think 8 1/2" allen heads ought to keep the edge in place. Need to make a simple transfer punch next to transfer the holes to the blade. Bolts are on 5" centers. Simple and easy to reproduce later on when I make an edge with teeth cut into it.

allfluxedup
06-04-2011, 09:29 AM
Much nicer than the stuff I cobble together for personal use. Of course I always seem to cannabalize stuff for parts so nothing has much shelf life round here.
MLM

Stick-man
06-04-2011, 05:49 PM
Well, everything I was going to comment on in the beginning, was already said. So I just hung out watching. VERY nice work Boost!:drinkup: Can't wait to see the finished product.

DHPmike
06-05-2011, 11:38 AM
I may have missed where it was posted before but... whats the cutting edge made of?

Boostinjdm
06-05-2011, 12:40 PM
It's "grader blade" from the local steel supplier.

Boostinjdm
06-06-2011, 12:30 AM
Worked on the quick attach tonight. Getting real close, just have to correct a few issues. Warpage go me and the U shape closed up. Too narrow by 3/16" now. I think my 20 ton jack and a few wood blocks will fix it. Also have to fix the holes for the locking pins. I missed by the thickness of the material I think I'll just make some plates with rectangle holes and tack them in the right spot then fill in the old holes till they match. That will give me some more thickness. The round holes towards the top need bushings welded in (after spreading the U out) to use as mounts for a Y shaped top link.

Boostinjdm
06-08-2011, 04:39 AM
Just have to make the top link and paint. Gotta have paint.:laugh: Everything seems to fit as planned now. The side view shows what I intend to be the most used angle and the furthest back it will be. Any adjustment will be to rock the blade forward so it doesn't dig as much. With 5" of adjustment, I can almost get the cutting edge straight up.

Boostinjdm
06-24-2011, 08:48 AM
Done for now. Going to test it here in a few hours. Gotta wait for the neighbors to wake up before running the skid loader. I did manage to make a mistake designing the top link. It only works when the blade is in the straight position. I didn't get my upper and lower pivots lined up. I've already figured out a solution, but it will wait till I actually need to angle the blade. Kinda screwed up the paint too. I prepped it upside down and it looks like all the oil just ran to the bottom (now the top) of the blade when I hosed it down. Oh well, guess I'll just have to go scratch the rest of it up so no one notices.

Chuck
06-24-2011, 10:19 AM
That came out nice.

Boostinjdm
06-24-2011, 10:29 AM
Just saw somebody else drive by in a skid loader. I guess I'll go see if my blade works...

Boostinjdm
06-24-2011, 11:58 AM
Well, I got about an hour of seat time. There is no such thing as a little bite in fine material. The heavy rains have been washing away one of my driveways. So I figured that would be a good test run. It's 3/16 limestone with fines (I wanted 3/8, but the trucker screwed up). I tried tilting the blade all the way forward even raised the arms and used the bucket cylinders. It just dug and dug till it hit hard ground. I'm thinking maybe some skid shoes would help. It does back drag pretty good though. Have to back drag in high gear or it gets bouncy. Going to go try and dig up some dirt and weeds next.

Chuck
06-24-2011, 02:28 PM
Well, I got about an hour of seat time. There is no such thing as a little bite in fine material. The heavy rains have been washing away one of my driveways. So I figured that would be a good test run. It's 3/16 limestone with fines (I wanted 3/8, but the trucker screwed up). I tried tilting the blade all the way forward even raised the arms and used the bucket cylinders. It just dug and dug till it hit hard ground. I'm thinking maybe some skid shoes would help. It does back drag pretty good though. Have to back drag in high gear or it gets bouncy. Going to go try and dig up some dirt and weeds next.

What you've got is a very common complaint about blades with new sharp cutting edges. I bet it gets better after you use it a while.

taylorlambert
06-26-2011, 01:02 AM
Thats a great looking blade you have built. I have a Case 1840 Uniloader. I bought a Bobcat brand grader blade. It has a set of Casters and a ripper. I dont have the controld wired into the Case yet but have set up the blade to run from one single cylinder for my aux. It makes a nice finnish. I added side plates to carry some load and it makes a feally good leveler. We dont get alot of snow here got 12 inches this year and i converted an old snow plow i got at the scrap yard to go on it.


I made s a straight box blade for a topsoil laying job at the lake. I had to put down 2 inches of TS without going over .750 for the inspector to let the sod layers come in. Rough spreading with a full bucket was good but too much time wasting the full bucket at the end of a push. I was also going over specs on the laydown. Ididnt see a problem with 1/4 to 1/2 inch but the inspector broke out post diggers. I halved a pipe and built side plates and my QC. I put on a set of legs with castors on them with a hydradli cylinder to set my leg hight.


I rough spread with the bucket and spot dumped and then used this box to really iron things out. It saved the job. THe only thing I let another contractor I sub for borrow it and a crackhead that he hired scrapped it for cash. Im gathering for another now. Heres a link to a dozer blade with add on wheels from Quik Tach/ erskine and Horizontal
http://www.horizonattachments.com/Skid-Steer-Dozer-Blades-s/41.htm#axzz1QM1mKF6h

The depth is set with the loader tilt.

Boostinjdm
06-26-2011, 01:21 AM
I don't see how those wheels would help me. Seems like they would just move the humps and bumps around. My skid loader is very light and can jump around pretty easy.

After playing with it some more today. I am thinking really hard about making bolt on side plates with adjustable skid shoes. It would basically become a box blade. The shoes would keep it from taking a huge bite like it wants to.

dhem
06-26-2011, 03:16 AM
Nothing like going to the trouble of making a drawing, using the DRO to get within half a thou, and then watching the holesaw wobble all over the place. I think I need to make a good arbor for the holesaw, and finish up with a boring head on the next project.

I hate when this happens and my drill press is worn out so it happens to me a lot. Needless to say a mill is definitely in my future and when that happens I want to try these annular cutters: http://www.onlinemetalstore.com/items/Evolution_Premium_Annular_Cutters_Item.cfm

Boostinjdm
06-26-2011, 04:02 AM
I hate when this happens and my drill press is worn out so it happens to me a lot. Needless to say a mill is definitely in my future and when that happens I want to try these annular cutters: http://www.onlinemetalstore.com/items/Evolution_Premium_Annular_Cutters_Item.cfm

Making a good arbor pretty much cured the wobble problem. Now when I make 1 1/2" holes they end up being a press fit. Run a carbide bur around them real quick and they become a slip fit. Close enough for the weld in stuff I do.

farmshop
06-26-2011, 10:40 PM
skid shoes are the answer. We have a 14' blade on 4wd tractor. has ar-400 shoes for when we push silage and we can adjust the for light digging or take them off for serious digging.

Boostinjdm
12-13-2011, 12:16 AM
Well, since we're into snow season, I figured I'd better get back on the ball. My blade hasn't been able to swivel since I built it due to a brain fart designing the top link. I think I've got that squared away now. I'm calling this one version 2.0. I even got to use my home made dimple die on the bottom side.:D

Boostinjdm
12-13-2011, 12:18 AM
More pics.

killdozerd11
12-13-2011, 10:44 AM
What your going to have to do is make a skid shoe or what is on the cat 824/834 rubber tired dozer called the sole plate

your blade rides on that and the angle of the blade set by the operator for more or less aggressive cut that way it will quit the tuna ville trolly ride

monkers
12-13-2011, 01:05 PM
Nice work!

Boostinjdm
12-13-2011, 02:06 PM
What your going to have to do is make a skid shoe or what is on the cat 824/834 rubber tired dozer called the sole plate

your blade rides on that and the angle of the blade set by the operator for more or less aggressive cut that way it will quit the tuna ville trolly ride

Skid shoes, 6" blade extensions, and plates to make it a box blade/snow pusher are in the works.

mwshaw
12-13-2011, 05:33 PM
I was going to suggest seeing if you could find a 48" gravely snow blade. Its just the size and type you need. I have seen the m371 and they are tiny. You won't be able to move much with one of those. Looks like you have a good start on it.

Boostinjdm
12-19-2011, 12:54 AM
I have seen the m371 and they are tiny. You won't be able to move much with one of those.

I beg to differ. I can move a helluva lot with mine. Just takes a little longer....

Got the blade extensions welded up. They need to be cleaned up and re-mounted so I can figure out where/how to attach skid shoes.

Old Doug
12-19-2011, 01:56 PM
I wish you the best with your blade. I had a tractor with a loader it came with a blade. It was adjustable but It was never at the right angel it always tried to dig in.The tractor was powerful it could fold the loader up at a idle.the buket was a 1000 times beter.

Boostinjdm
12-20-2011, 12:23 AM
Ground clean and mounted. Now trying to figure out skid shoes. I was going to make a bolt on bracket for the shoes, but I'm leaning towards a piece of DOM with a stand off welded to the back of the blade extensions. Then taking the disk shown in the last pic and making it cup shaped with a peg and washers through the DOM. Similar to how a truck mounted snow plow gets it's shoes.

Boostinjdm
12-21-2011, 12:01 PM
Got a little sidetracked last night and ended up with a new tool. I use cupped disks for a few different things. Now I have a tool to make them uniform. Reference grooves are for 4", 5", and 6" disks. The ones in the pic are 5" x 3/8" thick. These will be my skid shoes.

Boostinjdm
12-22-2011, 07:00 PM
Progress.....

DSW
12-22-2011, 07:10 PM
Your pipe looks a tad low to me. With the post installed how high off the ground does the cutting edge sit? I almost never use the disks on my Fisher's plows. I can't get enough down pressure to clear the snow if it's packed some times. Not as big an issue with a skid steer where you can apply down force, but you still won't clear all the way down with the disks installed the way it looks.

The only time I use mine are on the gravel lot at the shop, so I don't plow up too much gravel. I still have it set almost touching the ground. With my blade I have to worry about cutting edge wear on the roads, so the tubes are set much higher to allow for wear. I doubt you'll wear that edge much unless you do a lot of blacktop/concrete.

Boostinjdm
12-23-2011, 12:47 AM
Your pipe looks a tad low to me.

They look low, but they aren't. I'll get more pics when the paint dries and I can assemble it. I put a lot of thought into the height. There is adjustment to allow a new cutting edge to be about an inch off the ground. There is also enough adjustment to allow 3/4" or so to be worn off the cutting edge and still have it contact the ground. I don't know if that's a clear enough description or not. I will mostly be using this on my gravel driveways for snow. Maybe a pass or two down the street in front of the house and depending on how the skid shoes work, maybe moving some dirt during the warm part of the year. I figure for my test run I'll set it up like my snow blower. Throw a few quarters under the cutting edge and drop the shoes to the ground.

monkers
12-23-2011, 05:47 AM
I love the tool to make the discs! How big of a press do you have? they look great, as do your shoes.

Boostinjdm
12-23-2011, 01:33 PM
I love the tool to make the discs! How big of a press do you have? they look great, as do your shoes.

It's just a 20 ton and it took all she had to form those 5" X 3/8" disks.

Boostinjdm
12-29-2011, 04:40 PM
I think I can call these done now. That is a 3/4" spacer in it right now. Puts my blade about a 1/2" off the concrete. I figure it will sink in a bit on the gravel. If not, I can raise/lower it in 1/8" increments using my spacer assortment. I might not get to test it for a while though. Currently 46 F here in NW Iowa. The next week or so looks the same.:confused:

thenrie
01-05-2012, 01:31 PM
That is one HEAVY DUTY blade! I'll bet it was an enjoyable project. Excellent workmanship. Now it needs a hydraulic angle changer. When you're moving snow, it's really nice to change the angle of the blade without having to jump out into the muck to do it. I'll change the angle a number of times as I push snow off my driveway.

Almost hate to mention this, but I bought a 18hp garden tractor with a 46" mowing deck, a 3-bag bagger, and a 48" dozer blade for $150 a couple years ago. A tune-up, a little weight on the rear, tire chains, and it would push a pile of snow all day. One thing you'll have to watch out for is digging into your driveway, since you don't have a spring-loaded blade. You'll be cruising along a couple miles per hour pushing snow and hit a high spot and throw yourself through the front uprights! A spring-loaded blade will hit the bump and jump over it. It will push dirt as well, but only if it's loose stuff. Good for leveling, but not for digging, due to the springs.

Also, a skidder has so much tire surface on the ground, that you'll probably benefit from adding a weight rack and suitcase weights on the back, as well as tire chains.

mla2ofus
01-05-2012, 04:37 PM
Boost, if it still wants to dig, or as us ol' catskinners called it, make corduroy. Try putting the lift in float if it has that option.
Mike

Boostinjdm
01-05-2012, 05:40 PM
Will still don't have any snow here, but I did go play in the dirt a bit. With the blade angled, I can move a hell of a lot of dirt smoothly. I suspect snow won't be a problem. The depth of cut stayed consistant too. My float doesn't work for some reason, but it would be the cat's *** for snow removal.

daddy
01-05-2012, 06:45 PM
Float is really useful for grading dirt or stone. Especially when backdragging with a flat bucket.

Boostinjdm
01-20-2012, 01:54 PM
I got to test the blade out in the snow today. I shot some video. If it turned out, I have it edited and posted later on.

Boostinjdm
01-20-2012, 03:44 PM
Test run video....
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=83FxwBtCj0U&context=C3adaf1fADOEgsToPDskJ39Hji74eApgQvH5mzBGkS

tbone550
01-20-2012, 06:00 PM
Just looking at you pushing snow with that machine makes me cold! Open-cabbed skid-steers have to be one of the worst machines to run in the winter. I have been there and done that. I got the T-shirt too, but it froze up so bad it broke into little pieces when I went to take it off. :jester:

killdozerd11
01-20-2012, 08:11 PM
You get all the good jobs

Ha Ha :)

Bob
01-20-2012, 09:32 PM
I just got an old Bobcat 610 and I need to make the interchangability plate with the latches. Did you make yours or is that one new enough to have already had it?

forhire
01-20-2012, 09:42 PM
Looks good Boost! When you get done playing you can come by my place and do the sidewalks. :laugh:

Boostinjdm
01-20-2012, 10:04 PM
I just got an old Bobcat 610 and I need to make the interchangability plate with the latches. Did you make yours or is that one new enough to have already had it?

I guess I don't know what exactly you are asking. To see what I've got, check out my "never hurts to ask" thread. I think I have another thread where I built the new bucket showing the bucket side of the quick attach. Should be some pics in the early part of this thread too.

rdionne
01-21-2012, 09:23 AM
that blade setup is slicker than snot on a hoe handle! awesome job Boost! I had 2 bobcat 310s & couldnt believe their potential. good luck with it.
Bob

cd19
01-21-2012, 11:29 AM
This is what I am using this year, just got it put together this fall, so far I love it.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n100/chrismduffield/PB280103.jpg

I can start a thread showing all the details if someone wants to see.

Boostinjdm
01-21-2012, 01:51 PM
that blade setup is slicker than snot on a hoe handle! awesome job Boost! I had 2 bobcat 310s & couldnt believe their potential. good luck with it.
Bob
It's actually kind of amazing. I cleared about 300' of the street 30' wide and 6" deep in about 30-45 minutes. You can see in the video that I did have to take some passes with the blade raised up to keep the snow rolling as I neared the edges. With the blade straight it pushes a lot too, but I think I need some side plates for that. Spillage out the sides made for lots of passes.


This is what I am using this year, just got it put together this fall, so far I love it.
I can start a thread showing all the details if someone wants to see.
Go for it.

mla2ofus
01-21-2012, 08:40 PM
Looks good, Boost. If the snow rools over the top too much, get a peice of old conveyor belt, fairly thin, weld some clips to the top of the moldboard and attach the belt so it hangs over the blade. I did that to my wheeler blade when we lived in Idaho and it worked great.
Mike

Boostinjdm
01-21-2012, 08:53 PM
Looks good, Boost. If the snow rools over the top too much, get a peice of old conveyor belt, fairly thin, weld some clips to the top of the moldboard and attach the belt so it hangs over the blade. I did that to my wheeler blade when we lived in Idaho and it worked great.
Mike

This one actually rolls the snow real well even in low gear (2 or 3 mph). Makes a nice curt up to about 6" higher than the blade and falling forward. It doesn't come over top of the blade till I hit the pile. I reckon I must have done something right. I did play with the forward/aft angle a bit and ended up right back at the original setting.