PDA

View Full Version : 2024 aluminun



gmc1999
01-05-2007, 08:41 PM
Ok, heres one this is for airlon's on a airplane wing, military spec. Is there a way to weld it even though it's non-weldable. I really don't want to go to prison because of a military airplane crash.

lorenzo
01-05-2007, 09:05 PM
I thought the military only wanted aircraft repairs made with rivets...

riley mcmillan
01-05-2007, 09:44 PM
There are proceedures to follow in mil spec. I've seen people fired for something as simple as not following proceedures in alodine treatment of aluminum after it was stamped off on a workorder. These proceedures are there for a reason.

Doolittle
01-05-2007, 10:27 PM
I welded some 2024 3/4" rod together for fun (got it from the ol' scrap yard). The welds held but were big fat things and brittle (too much silicon?). Anyway, I wouldnt risk it unless... you find an approved procedure somewhere. Probably need to use a specific rivet and patch material to be in spec I would guess.

Oh wait!!! Theres still the JB weld trick! heh.

zapster
01-05-2007, 10:32 PM
Ok, heres one this is for airlon's on a airplane wing, military spec. Is there a way to weld it even though it's non-weldable. I really don't want to go to prison because of a military airplane crash.



DON'T DO IT!!!!

you don't wanna be "it"..:nono:

...zap!

tresi
01-05-2007, 11:05 PM
I'm licensed aircraft mechanic with 15 years of government contract work under my belt. If this is going on an aircraft you know that welding this would be illegal and unsafe. If you're using this in a non aircraft application you still would be better off attaching this rivets, screws or bolts. Aircraft alloys can be amazingly strong but with an equally amazing intolerance unapproved methods.