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  1. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Long Island
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    2,813

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeGyver View Post
    A solid shade 11 or so filter will work just fine. It's what I'm going to take if I go watch the eclipse.
    Yeah, 11 or so is about right for me too. I find a 10 makes me squint, and a 12 is a bit too dim for me for optimal viewing. By 14 (the max shade on my autodark), there's no detail left in the sun for me. People with blue eyes may want to go one shade darker.

    If you're going to a store to buy a shade, get one of the gold plated ones, and treat it VERY gently. The metallic shades give a better color rendition of the sun than tinted glass, but scratches in the surface can let dangerous light slip past. If you put one of these in a welding hood to view the sun, just put a clear cover lens on top, and you'll be safe.
    The best kind of solar filters are glass, metalized on both sides. That way a scratch on one side won't line up with a scratch on the other. This is what I have for my telescope, and it makes for some nice sunspot viewing.

  2. #27

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    IR remote transmiot in pulses, so the hood might pulse on and off faster than one can tell letting strong light through.
    ___________________________
    welding helmets auto darkening

  3. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    socal
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    460

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    This is a little late, but, I tried two 11's to view the 'transit of venus' and they were too dark. (it was like a pea on a paper plate) I then tried an 11 with a oxy weld shade (dont know the # but it was pretty dark), it was just about right, 'however', I could not see anything till I THOROUGHLY cleaned both lenses. It was worth the effort, as there'll be no transit for 100+ years. -corne-

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    Bemidji MN
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    13,036

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    I used fixed shade 10 to watch an eclipse back in high school,1986 or 1987 I think.

    Me and my kids used my auto dark on 12 last year to see a sun event (don't remember which one). Seemed ok.

    Dave J.
    Dave J.

    Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance. ~George Bernard Shaw~

    Airco 300 - Syncro 350
    Invertec v250-s
    Thermal Arc 161 and 300
    MM210
    Dialarc
    Tried being normal once, didn't take....I think it was a Tuesday.

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Stevens Point, WI
    Posts
    3,991

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    Bump for the new eclipse.

    The boyscouts are having a get together for the eclipse. Thinking of using my welding lids for my son and I instead of the $2 knock off glasses the boyscouts are buying for the kids. Both my lids are 13's
    12v battery, jumper cables, and a 6013.
    I only have a facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/pages/VPT/244788508917829

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    373

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    Buy the $0.99 glasses on eBay.
    Gina M. Tabasso
    HGR Industrial Surplus
    gtabasso@hgrinc.com
    www.hgrinc.com

  7. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    2,296

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    everything you wanted to know about eclipses and when the future ones will be...
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_...ugust_21,_2017

  8. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Aurora, CO
    Posts
    945

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    Quote Originally Posted by Sandy View Post
    Is an eclipse somehow brighter than the normal sun?

    About a twelve should be about right.

    Keeping the hood triggered is the problem. Neither of mine will stay triggered with sunlight alone. Flash dark, yes, but stay triggered -no.

    One hood you can look at the sun while pointing an IR remote at one sensor and it'll trigger and at a shade ten it seems like it might be a little light. Do the same with the other and a 13 seems like it will be too dark. Between 11 and twelve might do it.

    Remember, with a hood the harmfull rays are already blocked. The brightness is all you need to worry about.
    The problem with an eclipse is because the total light is less, your iris opens wider, allowing more UV from the visible portions of the sun in.

    For everyone else, the only thing you need to worry about is UV light when it comes to damage from looking at the sun/eclipse. Eyes can be damaged thermally, or by a photo chemical process. UV causes the photo chemical damage. But any welding or cutting lens will have 100% UV protection. In order for your eyes to get permanent thermal damage, you pretty much have to be on drugs. Your pain reflex in your eyes won't allow it. It will be excruciating long before your eyes can be damaged.

    Your shade selection will be based completely on comfort.

  9. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    North Georgia
    Posts
    2,410

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    Its passing over me...
    Schools are out for the event in the county north of me, my county is extending school for the event.

  10. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    New Jersey (yeah it sucks)
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    708

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    My LWS can't keep the #14 filters on the shelf to save his life. i have a couple of old fixed shade helmets I will drag out for the eclipse; some good sun glasses and #10 is going to be another option for some of my friends.

  11. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    147

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    When I worked at a LWS back in the late 90's We didn't stock the shade 14. When there was an eclipse and everyone wanted lenses we just sold a 9 and a 5 and they taped them together. Some used the gold lense on the outside but not really needed.

  12. #37

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    Quote Originally Posted by dna930 View Post
    I did a search as was unable to find anything regarding autodarkening helmets and the upcoming solar eclipse. All of the websites I have check recommend a 14 shade for viewing but most of the autodarkening helmets only go up to 13. What is the difference between a 13 shade and 14 shade? And is a 13 shade adequate for eye protection when looking at a solar eclipse?
    Contrary to even what NASA recommends (#14 shade lens) protection does not correspond to the shade of the lens. It is just a darker shade than let's say a #10 lens. All arc welding lenses no matter the shade provide 100% protection from UV and IR Wavelengths. So this #14 requirement is a canard. I was a welder and fitter for 28 years. You just have to make sure the lens is not scratched. Shade is just a matter of preference. I use a #10 lens for all types of welding because it is my preference.
    Last edited by Chaoszen; 08-11-2017 at 06:36 AM.

  13. #38
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Wyoming US
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    3,266

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    I tried comparing an auto dark lens dial settings with some fixed lens, wasn't even close.

  14. #39
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Andover, Ohio
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    2,776

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    Chaoszen, welcome to the forum.
    Lincoln A/C 225
    Everlast P/A 200

  15. #40
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Aurora, CO
    Posts
    945

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    Quote Originally Posted by Chaoszen View Post
    Contrary to even what NASA recommends (#14 shade lens) protection does not correspond to the shade of the lens. It is just a darker shade than let's say a #10 lens. All arc welding lenses no matter the shade provide 100% protection from UV and IR Wavelengths. So this #14 requirement is a canard. I was a welder and fitter for 28 years. You just have to make sure the lens is not scratched. Shade is just a matter of preference. I use a #10 lens for all types of welding because it is my preference.
    I try to spread this information when I can, but there's so much misinformation already going around that there is no point.

  16. #41
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    SF Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    10

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    Quote Originally Posted by Chaoszen View Post
    Contrary to even what NASA recommends (#14 shade lens) protection does not correspond to the shade of the lens. It is just a darker shade than let's say a #10 lens. All arc welding lenses no matter the shade provide 100% protection from UV and IR Wavelengths. So this #14 requirement is a canard. I was a welder and fitter for 28 years. You just have to make sure the lens is not scratched. Shade is just a matter of preference. I use a #10 lens for all types of welding because it is my preference.
    NASA, and AAS (American Astronomical Society), aren't just concerned with safety. They are also considering comfort and convenience. They want viewers to have a comfortable experience to further their goals of promoting astronomy and science. They want their suggestions to be convenient, so Soccer Mom doesn't give up and get her kids the shoddy knockoffs from the cart vendor in the parking lot at the park. Certainly they aren't catering to experienced welders with an assortment of filters available to experiment with. So, usually they say Shade 14. One site, I forget if a sub-page on their sites or linked on their site or in a news article explained: Get a minimum of Shade 12, but that's too bright for most people's comfort. Shade 13 is seldom stocked, so their recommendation is to get either (certified) solar glasses or goggles with a Shade 14 welding filter.

  17. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    4,258

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    I plan on looking at the eclipse (any cloud cover permitting) thru a Phillips Safety, gold plated shade #12. But I'm not planning on sitting there start to finish staring at it. Most likely what will happen is that I'll look at it for 30 to 60 seconds before handing the hood to some one else so they can take a look at it for a similar time frame before handing it off to some else in the group for their turn at it.

    IIRC correctly, start to finish for the eclipse at my location is something like 2 hours, 47 minutes. I think if you just check on the progress of it every now and then for a minute or less at a time you should be fine with a shade #12.

  18. #43
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    Oct 2015
    Location
    Aurora, CO
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    945

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    Quote Originally Posted by HT2-4956 View Post
    I plan on looking at the eclipse (any cloud cover permitting) thru a Phillips Safety, gold plated shade #12. But I'm not planning on sitting there start to finish staring at it. Most likely what will happen is that I'll look at it for 30 to 60 seconds before handing the hood to some one else so they can take a look at it for a similar time frame before handing it off to some else in the group for their turn at it.

    IIRC correctly, start to finish for the eclipse at my location is something like 2 hours, 47 minutes. I think if you just check on the progress of it every now and then for a minute or less at a time you should be fine with a shade #12.
    I'd recommend still wearing sunglasses with UV protection if you're going to be outside. You most likely wouldn't get any noticeable permanent damage without them, but over time, just having exposure to the sun without UV protection for your eyes compounds over the years and degrades the eyes. Light in the UV spectrum changes certain proteins in the eyes which leads to clouding, leading to cataracts. Like I mentioned above, the danger with the eclipse is that because there is less total light, your irises will open larger, allowing more of the UV light in. A good comparison with this precaution is hearing conservation, and the eclipse to your eyes can be compared to holding a funnel to your ear.

  19. #44
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
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    Not there
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    1,740

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    Get back to work and watch the shiit on TV later
    Better yet Get it over with now @ 1080 !
    Last edited by Bonzoo; 08-11-2017 at 08:50 PM.

  20. #45
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    4,258

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBFA View Post
    I'd recommend still wearing sunglasses with UV protection if you're going to be outside. You most likely wouldn't get any noticeable permanent damage without them, but over time, just having exposure to the sun without UV protection for your eyes compounds over the years and degrades the eyes. Light in the UV spectrum changes certain proteins in the eyes which leads to clouding, leading to cataracts. Like I mentioned above, the danger with the eclipse is that because there is less total light, your irises will open larger, allowing more of the UV light in. A good comparison with this precaution is hearing conservation, and the eclipse to your eyes can be compared to holding a funnel to your ear.
    BFA,

    Good point for the non-prescription eye glass wearing people here. I've been wearing those high end transition lens prescription glasses from the moment I wake up until I go to bed again at night for so many years now that I just take the protection they give me for granted and forgot that's not the case for every one.

  21. #46
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Scottsdale, AZ
    Posts
    295

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    I think all the shade 14 stuff is either CYA or a conspiracy by the lense insert companies to get rid of all the stock nobody buys other than for the odd air arc gouging job.

    If #11 is good for the UV from a TIG arc arms distance away, it will be fine for staring at the sun.

  22. #47
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    Oct 2015
    Location
    Aurora, CO
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    945

    Re: Solar Eclipse and welding helmet

    Quote Originally Posted by HT2-4956 View Post
    BFA,

    Good point for the non-prescription eye glass wearing people here. I've been wearing those high end transition lens prescription glasses from the moment I wake up until I go to bed again at night for so many years now that I just take the protection they give me for granted and forgot that's not the case for every one.
    I think I do the same. I'm guessing contact lenses, or at least the ones I wear, have UV protection. I've never had arc flash, and I don't take any extreme precautions to avoid other people's arc light. I don't stare or try to watch anyone welding, but I'll normally just look off-canter if I'm working, or hold my hand up to block it if I'm just standing around or walking by. But I've definitely seen lots of arcs, and never had issues.

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