Lincoln AC225 mystery machine
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  1. #1
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    Aug 2012
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    11

    Lincoln AC225 mystery machine

    I recently picked up this Lincoln AC225 welder for a hundred bucks off of Craigslist.

    It was able to strike a spark, the selector knob turned freely, it came with a newer,longer power cord, the leads were 50' long and in good shape, and the roll-around cart with a place to hang those long leads was a nice addition.



    So far, so good.

    I get it home to do a teardown so that I can wirebrush all the electrical contacts, repaint the old, nasty cabinet and do a general cleanup of the interior when I find these in back...



    I have no idea what these things are for. I checked, and they were not connected to any power source whatsoever. In fact, the bases were only attached by a couple of screws each thru the metal case so I removed both items to reduce weight.

    I wanted to post a pic on here and see what might come up for an explanation. I can't seem to find a date of manufacture for the 'Tombstone' either, perhaps,I can be pointed in the right direction for it? BTW, the serial number is 6304 001 if that helps.

    I'll post another pic of the welder when I get it completed, but for now any help identifying the mystery parts would be very appreciated.

    Thanks.

    -urban

  2. #2
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    Mar 2012
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    602

    Re: Lincoln AC225 mystery machine

    Those are rectifier diodes.

    Judging by the removable leads in red and black, at some point, someone started doing a DC conversion on it and never finished.

    It'd definitely be worth finishing up though. The diodes are really the expensive part... Find or make an inductor for it, and you'll be golden.
    You didn't build that.

    '85 Miller AEAD-200LE

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    West Tennessee
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    Re: Lincoln AC225 mystery machine

    I have 2 of these...one AC and one AC/DC. AFIK the first 2 digits are the year of manufacture. 1963 should be copper windings in the transformer instead of aluminum. It's a good one. The leads should be worth what you paid for it. I would recommend leaving it as an AC unit rather than convert to AC/DC. More work and $ than it's worth when you can find various AC/DC stick welders used for very low prices.

  4. #4
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    Aug 2012
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    Re: Lincoln AC225 mystery machine

    Great info guys!

    At least now I know what the darn things are. Do these diodes have any resale value? And what kind of machine do you think they were they scavenged from, if you know?

    I kinda like Brad's idea of leaving the welder original, but if I did want to continue with the conversion how would I go about that.

    Thanks in advance.

    -urban

  5. #5
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    Jan 2008
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    Richmond, Virginia
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    3,076

    Re: Lincoln AC225 mystery machine

    According to Lincoln:

    The following transformer welders do not have serial numbers. The date of the manufacture for these units may be determined from the last three digits of the code number stamped on the nameplate.

    Units Involved:AC-225S, AC/DC-225/125, AC-275, AC-225 GLM, AC-225 SEARS

    Code Number Example:
    9422-001
    Code Year Month
    9422 1990 01 = January


    Unfortunately, the "001" could be 1960, 70, 80 or whatever. You could call Lincoln and they can tell you.
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  6. #6
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    Aug 2012
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    Re: Lincoln AC225 mystery machine

    Thank you.

    -urban

  7. #7
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    Mar 2012
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    602

    Re: Lincoln AC225 mystery machine

    Quote Originally Posted by urban assault View Post
    Great info guys!

    At least now I know what the darn things are. Do these diodes have any resale value? And what kind of machine do you think they were they scavenged from, if you know?

    I kinda like Brad's idea of leaving the welder original, but if I did want to continue with the conversion how would I go about that.

    Thanks in advance.

    -urban
    Too late to "leave" it original. It's already got additional holes drilled in the front panel.

    If you were to go about finishing it, you'd just need to make a couple bus bars to connect the diode leads together (look up a wiring diagram for a full-wave bridge rectifier)

    Then you'll need an inductor, which can be made by wrapping 20 turns of #2 cable around a piece of 2" round bar. Connect that to the positive rectifier output and the positive cable connector on the front of the machine. The negative rectifier output should go straight to the negative plug on the front of the machine.

    It's that simple.
    You didn't build that.

    '85 Miller AEAD-200LE

  8. #8
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    Sep 2011
    Location
    West Tennessee
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    326

    Re: Lincoln AC225 mystery machine

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldendum View Post
    According to Lincoln:

    The following transformer welders do not have serial numbers. The date of the manufacture for these units may be determined from the last three digits of the code number stamped on the nameplate.

    Units Involved:AC-225S, AC/DC-225/125, AC-275, AC-225 GLM, AC-225 SEARS

    Code Number Example:
    9422-001
    Code Year Month
    9422 1990 01 = January


    Unfortunately, the "001" could be 1960, 70, 80 or whatever. You could call Lincoln and they can tell you.
    I looked this site up. I'm now disappointed in Lincoln for not pinning a clear serial # date of manufacture on these machines. We could do without the month, but it would be nice to have an exact, and easily determined, year of manufacture. My early AC225 has the # 7050-110 and my newer AC/DC 225 is numbered 9221-605. So, the code # is definitely changing/progressing. I know the general time frame of the acquisition of the early welder at "around" 1970, but apparently it was actually in 1971. I made an assumption based on the early welder I have...but apparently I stand corrected. Sorry about the bad info.

    Now, as for converting to AC/DC. I have both types and have been inside both of my machines, and I would not try converting one because I just don't think it would be worth it. Check out the included pic's of an AC/DC and compare to yours and you may see how many things need changing. Also, I have welded with both and I don't think the DC is that good on these 225's. Now, in comparison, the DC on the bigger Lincoln Idealarc 250 is awesome ! So, I have reason to say that I don't think a conversion is worth it...but if you just like tinkering with electronics, then go for it, and we will help if we can.
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  9. #9
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    Aug 2012
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    11

    Re: Lincoln AC225 mystery machine

    Quote Originally Posted by BradTN View Post
    I looked this site up. I'm now disappointed in Lincoln for not pinning a clear serial # date of manufacture on these machines. We could do without the month, but it would be nice to have an exact, and easily determined, year of manufacture. My early AC225 has the # 7050-110 and my newer AC/DC 225 is numbered 9221-605. So, the code # is definitely changing/progressing. I know the general time frame of the acquisition of the early welder at "around" 1970, but apparently it was actually in 1971. I made an assumption based on the early welder I have...but apparently I stand corrected. Sorry about the bad info.

    Now, as for converting to AC/DC. I have both types and have been inside both of my machines, and I would not try converting one because I just don't think it would be worth it. Check out the included pic's of an AC/DC and compare to yours and you may see how many things need changing. Also, I have welded with both and I don't think the DC is that good on these 225's. Now, in comparison, the DC on the bigger Lincoln Idealarc 250 is awesome ! So, I have reason to say that I don't think a conversion is worth it...but if you just like tinkering with electronics, then go for it, and we will help if we can.
    Thank you for the pics, they were very illustrative. I think that adding DC to this machine is quite a ways beyond my skillset.

    I'm thinking I'll stick with what I have(because duh, it works) and maybe throw those diodes up on either eBay or Craigslist to see if there is any interest.

    -urban

  10. #10
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    Jan 2008
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    Richmond, Virginia
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    Re: Lincoln AC225 mystery machine

    According to a Lincoln press release, the AC225 was first produced on May 12, 1961. Your code 6304 001 is probably 1970.

    A code # 5348-410 was confirmed by Lincoln to be 1964. It has a metal current knob and does not say Lincwelder.
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  11. #11
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    Aug 2012
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    Re: Lincoln AC225 mystery machine

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldendum View Post
    According to a Lincoln press release, the AC225 was first produced on May 12, 1961. Your code 6304 001 is probably 1970.

    A code # 5348-410 was confirmed by Lincoln to be 1964. It has a metal current knob and does not say Lincwelder.
    1970 sounds like a great year!

    Thanks for the detailed info, it is appreciated.

    -urban

  12. #12
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    Aug 2012
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    Re: Lincoln AC225 mystery machine(UPDATE)

    Well darn. being the dolt that I am I deleted the image folder on my camera that documented my dis-assembly of the welder I bought.

    I have got the contact surfaces cleaned up, all important wires covered with fresh 3M glass-fiber insulation for safety, and the case primed and painted.

    Initial re-assembly was pretty straightforward, but now I'm having a couple wiring questions and I truly suck at reading wiring diagrams.

    There is a heavy green wire coming out of the power cord bundle that is currently attached the on/off switch. Is that a ground, and if it is where is the proper place for it?

    Then there are two wires coming off the reactor block. They kind of line up up with the two bottom holes on the on/off switch, but I need to know if this seems right.

    Third is the fan. There are two wires coming from the fan motor. The one is fine because it came with a male/female quick connect, but I don't remember where the other wire is supposed to go. It is black with a round end so it can be screwed down.

    Here are some pics...





    Thanks for any help, it is appreciated.

    -urban

  13. #13
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    May 2009
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    Re: Lincoln AC225 mystery machine

    The green wire from the power cord would be hooked to the case ,either directly or under some other screw or clamp.
    You might see if these photos help.http://weldingweb.com/showpost.php?p...51&postcount=8
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  14. #14
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    Aug 2012
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    Re: Lincoln AC225 mystery machine

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluewelders View Post
    The green wire from the power cord would be hooked to the case ,either directly or under some other screw or clamp.
    You might see if these photos help.http://weldingweb.com/showpost.php?p...51&postcount=8
    Okay, that bottom pic in your link helps with the fan question. It would make sense that those two wires would be hooked up to that on/off switch so that when it is turned on the fan is always on as well.

    (smacks forehead)

    Thank you.

    -urban

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