Best way to remove a welded part?
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    33

    Best way to remove a welded part?

    I need to move a jack that I welded to my trailer to install a fuel can box. What is the best way to go about this without using a torch? May not be the strongest weld since it is one of the first I did, but seems strong enough at this point. I don't want to compromise the trailer frame though, so is this even advisable? Pretty sure it is 3/16 angle. Thank you. Yes yes, I know-- should have planned it out better
    Daniel 5:23

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    shreveport, la.
    Posts
    324

    Re: Best way to remove a welded part?

    can you get to it with a grinder, or cut off wheel?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    NJ, USA
    Posts
    3,387

    Re: Best way to remove a welded part?

    Use the Acme Un-Weldinator.

    Cutting torch (O/A or plasma), cut-off wheel, sawzall, hack saw, etc, etc.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Out in the Sticks, WI
    Posts
    1,360

    Re: Best way to remove a welded part?

    Try to cut only the weld, without going into the trailer frame at all. go in with a cutoff wheel, cut just short of going into the jack or the trailer then see if you can pry it off, or get a chisel in there and start tapping it and tear the remaining weld. but thats just what I would do

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pittsford,VT.
    Posts
    131

    Re: Best way to remove a welded part?

    File it off with a three sided file, by the time you get it done you will have the next trailor all planed and won't have to redesign it. hehehe only kidding the cut off wheel works well but remember cut off wheels are for cutting not grinding.
    Life is tuff,so be sharp
    lincoln sp 100
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    $thousands in snapon

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    67

    Re: Best way to remove a welded part?

    A picture would help us advise you...
    MM252 w/30A
    MM140 w/o AS w/SM100 w/CO2
    TA ArcMaster 185 TIG/Stick
    TA 85 TIG/Stick Lunchbox
    Hobart (Miller) AirForce 625
    Hobart AirForce 250ci
    Victor O/A (bored)
    Lincoln Patriot AutoShade (freebie)
    45ACP for those stubborn jobs...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,738

    Re: Best way to remove a welded part?

    Got an Arc Air cutter? Makes it easy. I wash off the weld with a scarfing tip in my A/O torch other wise. You can buy a scarfing (or gouging) tip but they are very easy to make. Take an old cutting tip and drill out the cutting orfice to about three times it's original diameter about 3/16" deep and you have a scarfing tip. Turn your oxygen pressure down to around 15-20 pounds. Lay the tip almost parallel with the weld and wash it off.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    48

    Re: Best way to remove a welded part?

    Put a cutting disc on the grinder and go to town on it, then smash it with the hammer. I'm serious.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Odessa, TX
    Posts
    1,305

    Re: Best way to remove a welded part?

    What idon'tknow said works well. I'd use my torch with a scarfing tip or my arcair, but I have many years of experience with those. The grinder works well either with a disc or cutoff wheel and if you are careful the jack will be re-useable as well.
    The difference between art and craft is the quality of the workmanship. I am an artist.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    5,767

    Re: Best way to remove a welded part?

    You can use the desperate man air-arc:
    Air blow gun in one hand, electrode holder in the other.

    Really desperate man, can scrounge carbon rod too; like from a flashlight battery.

    Good Luck
    Last edited by denrep; 03-07-2008 at 10:21 PM.

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