Cutting and beveling pipe bends
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  1. #1

    Cutting and beveling pipe bends

    So I have never really ventured much off from from cutting tube, but looking at getting into pipe fabrication for turbo manifolds. I've mostly been an NA builder, but more and more demand has been coming in for turbo manifolds. I have a few questions in regards of those.

    1) What kind of pipe beveler are you guys using the to bevel the bends?
    2) When cutting the bends, do you normally weld a straight tube on there and then cut it on the band saw / chop saw?
    3) Good sources for those bends? I know ACE Stainless supply has been mentioned before, but just curious of any others.

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
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    Re: Cutting and beveling pipe bends

    Can't help with beveling, but as for bend, if you're not going to bend the stuff yourself, I would buy the prebent stuff and cut what you need. Nothing aggravates me more then see straight pipe/tube cut into little pieces to get the bends..

  3. #3

    Re: Cutting and beveling pipe bends

    Quote Originally Posted by speedfreak87 View Post
    Can't help with beveling, but as for bend, if you're not going to bend the stuff yourself, I would buy the prebent stuff and cut what you need. Nothing aggravates me more then see straight pipe/tube cut into little pieces to get the bends..
    That wasn't what I was trying to ask at all. I was more so asking if I were to buy a piece of bent pipe as show bellow, what would be the best way to hold on to it to make accurate cuts. (Ie. Welding a straight piece on one ends to hold it into a horizontal band saw) or do people just mark them and cut them on a vertical band saw?


  4. #4
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    Re: Cutting and beveling pipe bends

    Ahhhhh.. gotcha now. I use a vertical band.

  5. #5

    Re: Cutting and beveling pipe bends

    Did you make a jig to hold it in there properly so that you can do good repeat cuts?

  6. #6
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    Re: Cutting and beveling pipe bends

    I don't do enough, so no. but if I had to do production, I would for sure jig it.

  7. #7
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    192

    Re: Cutting and beveling pipe bends

    There are two really good ways to cut pipe or tubing for manifolds.

    First, cold saw. Expensive but mill like finish and very accurate.

    Second, band saw. Can be expensive too, It's possible to cut by hand, then sand to final line. You can also make or buy a jig to hold the tubing. Here's one type for an example: http://www.icengineworks.com/icewmain.htm

    Some people can cut by hand, with a carbide cutting wheel in a hand grinder. Usually needs finish by a sander, and can waste material, but it's not expensive to do.

    Beveling is usually done on a belt sander, but i've seen people do it with a grinder in a pinch. A 36 grit will make quick work of a schedule 40 bevel

  8. #8

    Re: Cutting and beveling pipe bends

    I do have a cold saw, would still need something to hold on to though.

    Ice Engine really like to sell expensive things. 80-150$ for a plastic cut piece ..

    I know that can be done on a belt sander, but it seems like people are using a special tool of sort. For example the images shown are certainly not done on a belt sander. I've seen devices that go into the tube and then bevel, but they are only meant for straight tubing and not bent tubing.


    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Moose View Post
    There are two really good ways to cut pipe or tubing for manifolds.

    First, cold saw. Expensive but mill like finish and very accurate.

    Second, band saw. Can be expensive too, It's possible to cut by hand, then sand to final line. You can also make or buy a jig to hold the tubing. Here's one type for an example: http://www.icengineworks.com/icewmain.htm

    Some people can cut by hand, with a carbide cutting wheel in a hand grinder. Usually needs finish by a sander, and can waste material, but it's not expensive to do.

    Beveling is usually done on a belt sander, but i've seen people do it with a grinder in a pinch. A 36 grit will make quick work of a schedule 40 bevel

  9. #9
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    Re: Cutting and beveling pipe bends

    it depends how crazy you want to go. I was faced with the same challenges to build a set of headers and this is what I built



    gives me this








    as far as cutting, I built this holding jig for my cold saw which I also bought just for this project








    the holding jig is made from one or 2 sizes up elbow, the beveler I have a thread here:

    http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?t=45518
    miller 330a bp TIG
    miller dynasty 200DX TIG
    millermatic 185 MIG
    thermal dynamics cutmaster 101 plasma cutter
    snap-on YA5550 plasma cutter
    hypertherm powermax 30 plasma cutter
    baileigh CS225 cold saw
    etc....

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    Re: Cutting and beveling pipe bends

    turbocad6

    Big Kudos for your scissor/clam/elbow cold-saw fixture, its
    been logged in my 'poach library'.

    A tech-tip . . . . . .

    I first used a Bevo cold-saw in 1978 on a foreign project; and in
    1996 + - ; I bought the first one I saw in the US, branded as a
    Scotchman.

    It took decades for cold-saws to migrate from exclusive machine
    shop use, to general-use in [the better] welding shops.

    It is surprising what a cold-saw can do with a bit of fixture
    imagination.

    Now, the tech-tip . . . . .

    When making a 'uni-cut' gripped by only one jaw, you need to
    balance/maintain the parallel of the jaw travel 'grip' so the jaws
    and slides are not racked.

    Racked means: to be to compressed out of square - on a plane.
    In a parallel vise, this results with premature jaw and slide wear.

    In short, put a spacer in the open jaw, the same grip width as the
    'uni-cut ' side.

    This will extent the life and integrity of your saw.

    Opus
    Last edited by OPUS FERRO; 02-11-2013 at 10:33 PM.

  11. #11
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    Sep 2008
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    Central NJ
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    Re: Cutting and beveling pipe bends

    Quote Originally Posted by turbocad6 View Post
    it depends how crazy you want to go. I was faced with the same challenges to build a set of headers and this is what I built



    gives me this








    as far as cutting, I built this holding jig for my cold saw which I also bought just for this project








    the holding jig is made from one or 2 sizes up elbow, the beveler I have a thread here:

    http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?t=45518
    impressive.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Brooklyn NY
    Posts
    954

    Re: Cutting and beveling pipe bends

    opus, yes you're right, I did notice how racked the vice became when compressing only one side of it with this clamp jig. now whenever I'm cutting a very small amount off the end of a piece of bar stock or pipe/tube I use a matching piece in the opposite jaw to counter act that, but I never bothered finding something the correct thickness to oppose this particular clamp setup. if I do another header though I will find an opposing block for it.

    I think this is the best way to cut these elbows and keep the cuts square and consistent, especially if you already have a cold saw
    miller 330a bp TIG
    miller dynasty 200DX TIG
    millermatic 185 MIG
    thermal dynamics cutmaster 101 plasma cutter
    snap-on YA5550 plasma cutter
    hypertherm powermax 30 plasma cutter
    baileigh CS225 cold saw
    etc....

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