Math needed for welding
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  1. #1
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    Dec 2008
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    Math needed for welding

    I am currently taking some welding courses, but it moved straight into more hands on training as opposed to classroom getting used to measurements, welding symbols, blue prints, exc. Coincidently, I am also taking a some advanced math courses to shore up those skills.

    Any recommendations on the type of math I should gear up on? Trig, Geometry?

  2. #2
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    Re: Math needed for welding

    If yer gonna do any layout, you gots ta have geometry.
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  3. #3
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    Re: Math needed for welding

    Geometry definitely, particularly if you do fabricating. But trig, is helpful, though I can't hardly remember a thing about it. Accounting math might be nice....got to keep those books.
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  4. #4
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    Re: Math needed for welding

    Trig. Very useful, sine cosine tangent and the like. Algebra as a pre-req, it's a foundation for solving all sorts of stuff.

    If you work in the US, knowing how to convert from imperial to metric measurements can be handy, and likely will only become more so with time. Being able to apply the correct conversion with the correct math.

    Being able to take degrees and convert that into length measurements on an arc. For example a part that is essentially a large arch (30' length of a circle with radius of 150') had brackets spaces every 7.9°, had to be able to use that information to mark locations for the brackets.

    Being able to estimate volume, and convert volume into weight. Very useful if you're dealing with larger items and overhead lifting.

    I would also recommend knowing how to do math long hand, without a calculator. Including long division. Sometimes it's more convent to just write the math out than it is to go get a calculator.

    As for weld symbols, I'm assuming that you're located int he US and are learning ANSI/AWS weld symbols. I would try and at least take a look at some ISO weld symbols as well. They are similar, but have differences. Particularly in arrow side vs other side designation, weld dimensions, and intermittent weld lengths/pitch. Be familiar enough that you can recognize which a symbol is, and be able to look up how the welds are called out.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    190

    Re: Math needed for welding

    definatly geometry and when iwas in school at ndscs we had a practical welders math book that was the thing also fractions, decimals and a very good calculator where you just plug in formula and get your answer

  6. #6
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    Oct 2007
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    Vandalia, Ohio near Dayton
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    Re: Math needed for welding

    Start with sound fundementals...some of the guys I attended welding school with couldn't add, subtract, multiple, and divide; even with a calculator. Know how to perform all these mathmatical operations with fractions and decimals. Be comfortable converting from fractions to decimals and back. Someone else mentioned the metric system. I second this suggestion. Understand how to convert from one unit of measurement to the other.

    If you've mastered all this already, then look at geometry. A few simple concepts, like a 3,4,5 right triangle will enable you to build things square. If you don't know, ask someone to show you the proper technique for using a tape measure, plumb bob, and spirit level. Knowing how to use these tools properly will help you avoid a lot of time consuming mistakes.

    Best way to learn how to read blueprints is to learn how to produce one yourself. Take a drafting course if you have the time. There are lots of good reference books on welding symbology that can provide the details you're looking for.


    Quote Originally Posted by Beagle Fab View Post
    I am currently taking some welding courses, but it moved straight into more hands on training as opposed to classroom getting used to measurements, welding symbols, blue prints, exc. Coincidently, I am also taking a some advanced math courses to shore up those skills.

    Any recommendations on the type of math I should gear up on? Trig, Geometry?
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  7. #7
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    Dec 2008
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    26

    Re: Math needed for welding

    Thanks for all the suggestions and recommendations! I've got the fraction/Dec conversions down cold, and all the adding stuff well in hand as well.

    That said, I really like the Drafting course/study idea and that is a great suggestion! Welding symbols and blueprints as well!

    Thanks again!

  8. #8
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    Jul 2008
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    Anchorage Alaska
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    Re: Math needed for welding

    Quote Originally Posted by Beagle Fab View Post
    I am currently taking some welding courses, but it moved straight into more hands on training as opposed to classroom getting used to measurements, welding symbols, blue prints, exc. Coincidently, I am also taking a some advanced math courses to shore up those skills.

    Any recommendations on the type of math I should gear up on? Trig, Geometry?
    I find that I use all 4 types of math addin miniusin timesin and dvidin

    anything else?

  9. #9
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    Dec 2005
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    Midland, Texas
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    1,016

    Re: Math needed for welding

    Look at this and see if you can figure out how to lay it out: http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php...091#post247091

    That will give you an idea of what you might need to know.
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  10. #10

    Re: Math needed for welding

    get a copy of "MATH TO BULD ON" its about $25 a great reference when you need to look up the right formula isbn # 0-9624197-1-0

  11. #11
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    Dec 2007
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    Guerneville Ca
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    Wink Re: Math needed for welding

    Simple geometry - like if you have a round steel disk how do you find the center?

    Figuring supplies for a job. But there is a hand held calculator made just for welders that can really help you with this task and i have seen it in Welding Journal magazine.

    Weights of materials - like you are going to load a 1 ton truck with steel plates and you want a safe load.1/4 inch steel plate weighs 10.2 pounds per sq.foot.What would a safe load be?
    Weights of materials are very important.

    How large of a tank to hold 10 gallons of liquid. Etc.,.
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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    16

    Re: Math needed for welding

    All of the previously posted suggestions are excellent, especially those referring to trig, geometry, and drafting. I would however add a couple of thoughts. If you can find a board drafting class instead of AutoCADD it will serve you better. Unless you are using a CNC cutter you will be doing your layout and cutting by hand. Thus the skills you learn on the board are directly transferable to sheet and plate stock. If you can take a class in Descriptive Geometry that is taught on the board that will improve your math skills in ways that will serve you best.

    Another source of info is the Audel’s series of technical books. Don’t just concentrate on the welding books, but also look at the millwrights, carpenters, and other tradesman books that contain math information.

    Glad to see someone pursuing your craft with such a focus.

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