inconel test
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Thread: inconel test

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    houston tx
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    150

    inconel test

    this monday 3/23/09 i will be taking an inconel test... 6G 2" sch 160 carbon pipe using inconel wire (not sure which type of wire)............... any tips would be greatly appreciated.
    would i run my temperature the same as if i was welding stainless or a bit hotter or colder?
    TIG all the way out
    Last edited by gto_welder01; 03-21-2009 at 01:14 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    houston tx
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    Re: inconel test

    ENiCrFe-3 <-------- not quite sure, but i believe this is the wire that will be given to me for the test

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Spartanburg South Carolina
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    208

    Re: inconel test

    it welds real similar to carbon in my opinion its used primarily in boilers
    Complete Fabrication Shop specializing in pipe fabrication. Also offering heavy steel fabrication and sheet metal work.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Iuka Mississippi
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    424

    Re: inconel test

    The Inconel I have welded was quite different than Carbon Steel. The GTAW root is not a big problem but the filler metal is less sluggish. Purging is critical and a sugared tack can be cause for rejection (even though the code is silent on root oxidation).

    Contaminants on the base metal or weld metal can form oxides on the surface of a GTAW bead that can be little hard to handle. So keep things clean.

    The SMAW portion gives people trouble usually with excessively convex bead profiles. Depending on how those beads are laid next to each other, you can cause a deep narrow valley to form that can cause non fusion issues. Since side bends will show any discontinuities pretty easily if they exist.

    In the tests I have taken for boilermaker work no grinder was allowed so placement of the starts was critical. If they layout where the straps are going to be cut from, try to avoid any starts/stops in that area. I suggest stringers as you can better judge where your stops and starts will be by bead length.

    If you have a "hard side" and cannot go all the way from bottom to top, try stopping at 90 degrees with a slight variation to keep all of the starts from stacking on each other.

    As you are filling the joint but getting close to flush, add a stringer where needed to make the weld at the same level. I usuall have to add a little metal from 11 to 1.

    When capping it may be helpful to keep the fill just below flush. This gives a slight ledge the bottom bead can tie into without having that "almost overlap" look that occurs on horizontal weld caps.

    A cool coupon makes things easier. If Air is around, let it blow on it. I have cooled plenty of them with a damp rag to avoid standing around too much. Though it raises an eybrow in many, it does nothing to the inconel OR the carbon steel coupon. Just ask th proctor if its OK.

    I just read all the post and noticed TIG all the way out. Sorry. Many of the same things apply. Bead placement, starts and stops, fill even before capping etc.

    TIg all the way. Bummer thats a slow go on a schedule 160. But I guess if they got the money, you got the time

    EDIT . On the amperage, I can run a little more amperage on Inconel than SS. Though the inconel is sluggish it is less likely to sag due to gravity and slow cooling. Your amperage selection will be based upon what travel speed you can weld at, what size wire you use, how thick the coupon is, and how hot the coupon is. Use a feather edge at the root. I typically keyhole the root but melting in will work and make it look slick. Remember ARGON is heavier than air so keep the bottom of the weld sealed and vent at the top.
    Last edited by gaustin; 03-22-2009 at 10:09 AM. Reason: Comment regarding Amperage.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    houston tx
    Posts
    150

    Re: inconel test

    thanks for your input..... i took an inconel test about 3 years ago but never had to weld it in the field..... i just dont remeber if it was more sluggish than stainless or if it was similar to carbon steel. anyways thanks for your input and we'll see how i do tomorrow.....worst thing that could happen is i fail, but this time ill try to remeber what to expect for the next time

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