Best height for a welding bench?
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  1. #1
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    Best height for a welding bench?

    One size doesn't fit all. And seeing as how I'll be the only one using mine, what is the ideal height for it?
    I remember reading somewhere years ago that the best height is 10cms (4? inches) below the elbow. Does that sound right?
    Or is it belly button height?
    Someone out there will know the formula.
    Scott

  2. #2
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    The ideal level for me is belt buckle height less strian on the back speaking of witch i need to build a new one mine's hamered
    WELDERS GET BETTER PENETRATION

  3. #3
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    Kelly: What's hammered, your table or your back? Scott, I like mine about waist high also.

  4. #4
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    Yep, beltbuckle-high. That's how tall my fridge is. You can put a half-size dorm fridge under one that high pretty easy and those fridges will hold a couple of 12-packs. While kelly and tek have the right answer, they have all the wrong reasons.

    If your fridge is taller, you gotta go taller with the table. If you have a Subzero that is 84 inches high...well, that means your table will have to be at least 7 feet high, and you're gonna have to use a ladder every time you weld or hammer. I mean, why else do you even have a shop, but to keep a secret stash of beer?

    Sometimes I worry about you guys...
    Smithboy...
    if it ain't broke, you ain't tryin'.

  5. #5
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    Oh yeah...Scott, for future reference, you shouldn't use the bellybutton as a measuring device. Sometimes it's above the belt buckle and sometimes it's below. This can create confusion, like what happened in biblical times with the cubit. To this day biblical scholars still disagree on how large a boat it took to house 2 of every animal. I mean, how far would you get when you open the instructions for building an ark if it said, "thine ark must beath 100 bellybuttons high and 500 bellybuttons wide and so on and so fortheth..." However, belt-buckles are always near the top of the pants, and because they are unambiguously situated, they make perfectly acceptable units for blueprint drawings.
    Last edited by smithboy; 09-28-2005 at 10:24 AM.
    Smithboy...
    if it ain't broke, you ain't tryin'.

  6. #6
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    Hi Smithboy,
    I reckon belt buckle position can vary more than belly button - especially for 16 year olds trying to look cool who slouch along with their pants around their thighs.
    Yesterday I asked a guy who works in ergonomics. He said the easiest way to work out the ideal height is to stand with your arm bent at the elbow and pointing straight out.
    Then you put your fist under the elbow and that's the ideal height.
    Seems to make sense.
    Scott

  7. #7
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    Grab a hammer, hold it in your hand with your elbow at 90 degrees and have someone measure from the head of the hammer to the ground. That's how I did mine and it worked out great.

  8. #8
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    The height would work out similar.
    It probably sounds anal, but the right height is worth considering given the amount of time people stand at a bench.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by smithboy
    Oh yeah...Scott, for future reference, you shouldn't use the bellybutton as a measuring device. Sometimes it's above the belt buckle and sometimes it's below. This can create confusion, like what happened in biblical times with the cubit. To this day biblical scholars still disagree on how large a boat it took to house 2 of every animal. I mean, how far would you get when you open the instructions for building an ark if it said, "thine ark must beath 100 bellybuttons high and 500 bellybuttons wide and so on and so fortheth..." However, belt-buckles are always near the top of the pants, and because they are unambiguously situated, they make perfectly acceptable units for blueprint drawings.
    Is that a Western belt buckle or one of those skinny Wal-Mart buckles?
    Just that alone can cause a wide dimensional variation.
    This too begs the question, is the dimension to the center of the buckle, the top or the bottom??
    And of course for the safety minded if you are wearing suspenders in conjunction with the belt, this could alter the final dimension as well.

    Chris B

  10. #10
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    Scott,
    No, it's not anal. I just have a good time with stuff like this. Since I sit in a office most of the day, y'all are the only folks I get to have fun with...about welding, anyway. Every time I mention the funny welding stuff I come across on this site, folks in my office look at me like I was talking about eating worms.

    BTW, Fl Rider is right. If you have perhaps won a rodeo, you might have a lot of possible variation in height, given those belt buckles are about the size of a car hubcap.
    Smithboy...
    if it ain't broke, you ain't tryin'.

  11. #11
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    Ideal height is determined by both the person and the task that is to be completed. I study human factors and ergonomics so I whipped out my handy ergonomics book to get what is accepted as optimal. Keep in mind that this is for the overall optimal heights- tall or short so if you are at one extreme or another you must adjust accordingly. Here is a basic breakdown:

    Optimal working height of hands for:

    Light assembly: 42"
    Tasks with large downward or sideward forces: 36"
    Tasks with large upward forces: 32"
    Visually demanding tasks: atleast 5-10" above elbow

    Keep in mind that these are measures for the optimal working hand height, the size of the object will then dictate how high the table must be so:
    Optimal working height - object height = table height

    So basically if you weld big stuff on the table the table should be lower so it is at the right height. Or if you are welding intricate stuff you should have it higher. Hope this helps. (All data is from Kodak's Ergonomic Design for People at Work)

    rigger
    Last edited by rigger; 10-05-2005 at 01:56 PM.

  12. #12
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    Thanks Rigger.

    I knew there would be an ergonomics guru out there.

    Looks I might need a couple of benchs.

    I'll just have to work out what those measurements are in metric.

    Scott

  13. #13
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    How about adjustable legs for these tables. Any design ideas?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by scott brunsdon
    One size doesn't fit all. And seeing as how I'll be the only one using mine, what is the ideal height for it?
    I remember reading somewhere years ago that the best height is 10cms (4? inches) below the elbow. Does that sound right?
    Or is it belly button height?
    Someone out there will know the formula.
    Scott
    I'm going to have to agree with smithboys take on things here. If I were to build one belly button high I'd have to cut a half inch a year off the dang thing.

  15. #15
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    Adjustable legs can be made easily with receiver hitch tubing and 2x2 tubing. One through hole in the hitch part and as many as you want in the 2x2 piece that has the caster/foot welded to it. Drill the holes for regular hitch pins.

  16. #16
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    Scott

    My table is 4'x8'. Swells' calculation is what I used for my table height. Two things I would consider if I were building another table are how easily I can reach the opposite side to weld something and how easily I can climb upon on it. I build up frequently and end up standing upon my table. That calculation created a table that addressed both of these needs. The table is around 36" high. I can reach about 36 inches to weld and stand on a cross member to reach the extreme. I also use the cross member to climb onto the table.

  17. #17
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    I'm 6'3" and found that a table that I can rest my fore arms on in a level position is comfortable... ANd let's face it, there is a TOO HIGH/LOW...but the less you have to bend, the better. (and a cross member or two below, does help if you need to get higher on the work, or reach further onto the table.
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