Tig welder info
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Thread: Tig welder info

  1. #1

    Tig welder info

    Hey looking for some help in trying to find a fair price tig to try and learn to use but dont want buy one to cheap and not be able to use long if like or lose to much in resale if not for me. I have bin looking at the miller diversion 180 just wanting to hear some feed back
    Thanks for the help

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  2. #2
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    Re: Tig welder info

    A lot of guys like the Diversion 180 for it's simplicity. Personally I don't like the fact you give up the ability to stick weld with that unit among other things.

    For me a good starter tig is an older Syncrowave 180 or syncrowave 200. Both have more duty cycle than the Diversion IIRC and the 200 has more top end power, an advantage if you are trying to do alum. The Syncrowaves also will easily allow you to add a water cooled torch, a big plus if you want to do alum as well.

    I've seen nice almost new Syncro 180's between $900-1300 and the Syncro 200's Between $1000-1400 depending on what all comes with them. If these are a bit rich for your blood, an older Miller 330A/BP will usually set you back between $400-900, and the units Miller made for other companies like Canox and Airco can be found even cheaper on occasions. Thes eunits are big, heavy and power hungry, but will do a great job in getting you started, and many guys never out grow them.


    If you can live without AC for alum, your options open up even more. There are a ton of good used DC tig units available. Maxstar 150's and 200's are excellent units. If you can afford one, a used XMT 304 is a wonderful stick, DC tig and Mig power source. I see the bare power source from between $1100-1400 and the tig gear will set you back another couple hundred. Nice thing is you can add a feeder and have a top end industrial mig as well, often for less than what a dedicated 230v mig plus a good DC tig combined would set you back. In a lower budget range there are the older Dialarc HF's. They can go down as low as $500 on occasion.

    Lincoln has a bunch of good options also, but I'm not as familiar with those models.
    .



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  3. #3

    Re: Tig welder info

    Thanks for the info stick isnt as inportant to me as I have a older miller thunderbolt that I havent turned on since I got my miller 211 mig but am thinking about upgrading that to a 252 I think I hoping the tig will when learned how to use right will do all my light end stuff
    Thanks again

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  4. #4
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    Re: Tig welder info

    If your Tbolt is an AC/DC unit, you can do basic DC scratch start tig with it fairly simply. You won't have a remote to control your amps, but guys use this same basic rig daily in the field all the time. If it's an AC only machine, it's not worth the effort.

    http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php...-Welder-People
    .



    No government ever voluntarily reduces itself in size. Government programs, once launched, never disappear. Actually, a government bureau is the nearest thing to eternal life we'll ever see on this earth!

    Ronald Reagan

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Re: Tig welder info

    Well, the good, bad, and the ugly are this;

    Good - AC/DC, inverter, dual voltage, low power draw, extremely user intuitive, idiot guide, and somewhat portable.

    Bad - Aircooled only, unless you cobble your own water cooled setup. HTP/Usa weld does make killer aircooled upgrades though.

    Ugly - The duty cycle is pretty low. The hot torch usually gives you a hint when duty cycle is an issue.

    Otherwise if stick is not your huckleberry, then the Diversion180 is a killer first tig IMO. You could not find a better tig to self learn with. Miller service if needed is first class.
    Weld like a "WELDOR", not a wel-"DERR"
    MillerDynasty700DX,Dynasty350DX3ea,Dynasty200DX,Th ermalArc400GTSW,LincolnSW2002ea., MillerMatic350P,MillerMatic200withspoolgun,MKCobra Mig260,Lincoln SP-170T,PlasmaCam/Hypertherm1250,HFProTig3ea.

  6. #6
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    Oct 2006
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    Re: Tig welder info

    For basic tig the Diversion is great. I knew a guy that bought the fancy Dynasty and after a while sold it for the 180. He didn't like all the bells and whistles. I think the 180 is in the CURRENT MILLER REBATE PROGRAM TOO.
    I bought a 180SD syncro for $800 complete less tank. GREAT for me, turn tank and machine on, set heat, and press pedal to weld. Best part is I can use it in the basement with no sparks, fumes, and it is quiet too.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Re: Tig welder info

    Quote Originally Posted by BD1 View Post
    For basic tig the Diversion is great. I knew a guy that bought the fancy Dynasty and after a while sold it for the 180. He didn't like all the bells and whistles. I think the 180 is in the CURRENT MILLER REBATE PROGRAM TOO.
    Oh Wow! I had not heard that one before. Usually Diversion owners master their ninja welding skills, then move up to the Dynasty to work on Jedi techniques.

    Yes, the Diversion is so simple it is almost boring.
    Weld like a "WELDOR", not a wel-"DERR"
    MillerDynasty700DX,Dynasty350DX3ea,Dynasty200DX,Th ermalArc400GTSW,LincolnSW2002ea., MillerMatic350P,MillerMatic200withspoolgun,MKCobra Mig260,Lincoln SP-170T,PlasmaCam/Hypertherm1250,HFProTig3ea.

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