I beam hoist.
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Thread: I beam hoist.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Columbus, OH
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    311

    I beam hoist.

    In my garage I want to put in an I beam that would support a hoist. This beam will be supporting at most 1 ton. The distance between the two cinder block walls is 10' 8"

    1. Should I fab up some plates, weld them to the end of the I beam, then attach with tap-cons?

    2. Or should I purchase two 4" diameter schedule 80 steel pipes to bear the load using the walls to resist movement horizontally?
    I'm a Hoss, and a Boss.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Re: I beam hoist.

    If you are talking about setting the beam on top of the block, you should grout the cells solid 1st. (not always easy or possible depending on they type of block and how good the masons were). At that point I'd set the base plate (with anchors attached) in the wet grout and then after it sets weld the beam to the base plate. Same would apply if you wanted to notch the block for a beam pocket. Grout the wall and set a base plate.

    Another option if grouting isn't feasible, is to use a long base plate on top of the wall to spread the load over more of the block. Use a 4' chunk of heavy angle, say 3/8 or 1/2" thick and weld gussets to the I beam to keep it vertical and to help spread the load to the angle.

    I would not rely on tapcons in a block wall unless the wall is solidly grouted and all you are doing is keeping the plate from moving side to side.


    If you are talking about bolting the beam to the side of the wall, don't. Even grouted solid the wall most likely won't support the weight of the beam and load unless it's really designed correctly. Block's not designed to hold loads that way. TApcons or concrete anchors won't hold the load. Thru bolts and backing plates in a solid grouted wall maybe, but I've cut too many "solid" walls and found them to be hollow to take a chance.



    The 4" pipe isn't a bad idea, but the floor most likely won't take the load. You would want to cut and break out the floor and either set the column on the footing of the existing wall, or pour a new one. Frequently garage slabs are 4" or less and often the sub base has settled under the slab. There may not be any good support under the column unless you open it up and check.



    I can't say what I would do with out seeing the job and looking at how the wall was built and what the floor looks like. If I had to make a guess, I'd say go with the pipe columns and plan to do new footings. Thats usually a safe bet. Personally I hate the columns in the room, so I'd want to take a good look at the wall and if there is enough room on top to do a base plate and get an idea how sound the wall is.
    Last edited by DSW; 11-15-2009 at 06:59 PM.
    .



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  3. #3
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    Columbus, OH
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    Re: I beam hoist.

    Thanks for the input. I'll probably build some sort of engine hoist/portable mini crane.
    I'm a Hoss, and a Boss.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    SoCal
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    4,338

    Re: I beam hoist.

    What is the hoist going to be used for, engine pulling? A cherry picker is easy to find, or would a gantry on wheels fit the bill?

    http://www.northerntool.com/images/p.../144847_lg.jpg

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  5. #5
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    Re: I beam hoist.

    The gantry on wheels would work. I would be lifting steel scrap and most likely engines in the near future.
    I'm a Hoss, and a Boss.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    8,502

    Re: I beam hoist.

    Good rule of thumb, if you don't have an engineering degree is 1" of web for every foot of clear span. And that's not a guarantee. Might actually be underbuilt.
    "Any day above ground is a good day"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    East Meadow New York
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    1,935

    Re: I beam hoist.

    I used to make something like this for lifting race boats on and off trailers, or special roll around dollies. The center trolley is mobile and you can lift the engine in and out of the boat with it.

    The wheels had swivel locks so they would not try to do a split on you. They did not do a split though even when not locked. But incase something fell into the hoist it seemed safer.
    They did work very well. Until I saw a guy drag a set of them with a forklift while they were lifting a 40 foot cigarette twin Siamese Oldsmobile block racing boat. He left the wheel swivels locked and the tracking of the wheels was more then enough to twist the frame. The boat did not drop because I called to him to stop.

    But they really are just for stationary lifting nothing more. They worked very well for that.

    http://www.Rockwelder.com/GeneralCad...ns/Aframe1.jpg

    http://www.Rockwelder.com/GeneralCad...ns/Aframe2.jpg

    Sincerely,


    William McCormick

  8. #8
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    Feb 2009
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    mountain west
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    Re: I beam hoist.

    Just my 2 cents worth.

    I use a hoist frame made of all salvaged steel, with an I beam from a trailer house hitch, about 12 inches deep, 10 ft long for the main beam, it has a foot long chunk of 5 inch pipe welded on each end that slide up and down the 4 inch pipe uprights, good heavy welds with gussets. The uprights have holes each foot for 3/4 inch pins. I use old 3/4 inch by 8 inch bolts for pins. the feet are 4 inch I beam 4 feet long with a foot tall 5 inch pipe welded standing up in the middle for the uprights. I use about 10 ft uprights. it is semi stationary, but can be slid around (when empty and assembled) to move it. I have lifted a 7,500 lb lathe with 2 chain hoists. To assemble it I set the feet on the floor, set the beam on it and drop the uprights down through the 5 inch pipes, and then lift each end of the main beam a foot at a time until it is the height I need it. ( I use 3 pins so the farthest it can drop is a foot when I raise it.) Takedown is easy as well. Every part can be loaded by hand. The engineered rating on this frame is about 12,000 lbs, with 2 hoists and trollies.

    I built a heavier one for my past work, it had 6 inch uprights telescoped with 5 inch to adjust from 7 to 12 feet. 10 feet wide, with a 12 inch I beam it was rated at 12 tons with 2 hoists. ( we would use it at 8-12,000 pounds) It had spring loaded casters that would let you roll it with a ton load, but would settle onto the floor for heavy loads. Our floor was 6 inches of concrete on grade and had supported 30,000 pounds on a 6" square plate, 10,000 lbs on a jack was normal.

    A garage beam like what you have mentioned can be very handy. A one ton load isn't too heavy for block or stud walls. Centered, that is only 1000 pounds per wall, if you load 3 blocks that is 330 pounds per block, or 170 lbs per bolt with 6 bolts. Most walls are built to handle a roof load of 60 - 100 lbs per square foot, that is about 1200 to 2000 lbs for each rafter on a 10 ft wide building. . . At 10 ft 8" wide, with a light one ton chain hoist, a 4" I beam would be marginal to good, But it seems that if I have one I tend to overload..I have lifted 4,000 lbs repeatedly with 2 hoists 4 feet apart on a ten foot long 4 inch I beam, on an old A frame I had. A 5 or 6 inch I beam would be about perfect, and will fit most ton trolleys. For heavy lifts you can use 2 trolleys and 2 hoists, this will handle anything a pickup can haul. . If the two trolleys are 4-5 feet apart, The beam will not be overloaded, for load calculation purposes the length between them is subtracted from the overall length..

    To attach it to the wall, a 4 inch angle a few feet long bolted through the wall with half inch bolts will be good, use 2 bolts per block and hit at least 3 blocks ( or studs). use 2 Inch washers outside, firm tight, don't crush the blocks. Grout them full of 2-3 parts sand. one part cement inside if possible, you can punch a hole and make a slury and funnel it in. One 1/2" or 5/8" grade 8 bolt per flange of the I beam to the angle, 4 total will be ok. A diagonal brace that comes down a couple of feet on the wall (or post) will help.

    If you use wheeled chain hoist trolleys, the end load on the beam will be minimal. The hoist will self center over the load. Little chance of damaging a wall that way. The long way of the wall the wall will handle many times the load you are talking about.

    If you are worried about the wall a 2 inch pipe or 4x4 wood post will easily support the weight. Unless the floor is really too thin and crumbly it will hold it. if you are worried, use a railroad fish plate under it to spread the load.
    Last edited by wesdavidson; 11-30-2009 at 05:52 PM.
    past work toys; lathes,mills, drills, saws, robots, lasers ironworker, shears, brake, press, grinders, tensile tester, torches, tigs, migs, sticks, platten table, positioner, plasmas , gleeble and spot. Retired June 30, 2009.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    397

    Re: I beam hoist.

    A ton isn't much weight but I suppose someone is likely to try to lift something heavier.
    If you are mainly lifting "stuff" off a pickup bed a portable design similar to an engine hoist- maybe a little taller with an electric winch would be handy. Make it so it will break-down for storage.
    Another thought-is you don't need the full 10' then hinge the shorter beam on the wall and make a wheeled pipe support for the other end-store it flat against the wall when not in use.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    70

    Re: I beam hoist.

    I found a 50 ft by 2 ft by 1 in web i beam in a junkyard and mounted it 16 ft high on the top of two electric poles that i had burried in the ground and mounted four chainfalls on manual trolleys to the i beam from 1 ton to 8 ton . the most it has lifted is about 5 ton , it works quite well but i think a guy should have about 24 ft under the hook.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Woodinville, WA
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    963

    Re: I beam hoist.

    I figured I'd piggy back on this thread is the OP doesn't mind. My question is pretty similar to his:

    I want to install a gantry hoist in my shop (pretty much just like this one):

    http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c2...5/01220003.jpg

    My shop is 24'x30', so it's quite a bit bigger than the one shown in the picture there. The primary use for this gantry will be to move equipment around the shop (figure up to around 2-ton). The moving span beam will be across the shorter width (so about 24'). The side beams will run pretty much the whole length of the shop but I'd like to keep it down to 3 supports per beam in order to avoid killing my usable wall space. No problem with the slab...I'll have 3' deep concrete beds poured for the posts to bolt onto. The question becomes:

    What beams am I going to need to use on the side with only 3 supports over a 30' span, and what beam am I going to need to use as the open span beam?

    Thanks

    --Wintermute
    "No man's knowledge here can go beyond his experience." - John Locke
    www.improvised-engineering.com
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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    318

    Re: I beam hoist.

    Here's a site with some ratings at different widths etc.

    http://www.wallacecranes.com/triste8.htm

    Poke around the site it is very good. It will give you a rough idea.

    As Samm said unless you are an engineer de-rate specs.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Woodinville, WA
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    963

    Re: I beam hoist.

    ohh, and just to clarify...I'm just trying to get an idea here for costing purposes (the rough size so I know the rough cost). The final beams will be spec'd by the engineer to make sure everything is what it needs to be for code and safety.

    --Wintermute
    "No man's knowledge here can go beyond his experience." - John Locke
    www.improvised-engineering.com
    Manufacturer Agnostic:
    Blood----------Sweat---------Tears
    ----|------------------|----------------|----
    Lincoln Red, Miller Blue, Esab Yellow

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