Building a repo wrecker, and an intro - Page 2
RSS | Subscribe | Contact Us | Advertise | About Us
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 57
  1. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    459

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    Looks good any new progress?

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Livingston, MT/Houston, Tx
    Posts
    543

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    Oh yes, since the last go round, I have a ton of updates.

    First off, this is the truck the old unit is coming out of.



    And this is the craptastic install that some one did.





    And Richard starting to cut it out.







    And the back of the frame being cut out.



    Me cleaning up some booger welds that used to hold the bed onto the frame.



    the end of the frame after I cut it straight.



    Fixing to test fit the framework.


  3. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Livingston, MT/Houston, Tx
    Posts
    543

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    Test fitting the frame.



    Mocking up the forward frame mounts.



    The slides stuffed through the unit.



    And yours truly with my "precision adjustment instrument" fixing to align the slides.



    Welding in the slides










  4. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Livingston, MT/Houston, Tx
    Posts
    543

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    The slides all welded in.





    Lifting the frame preparing to fit it to the truck.



    The unit sitting on the truck




  5. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    459

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    WOW looks awesome!!!

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Livingston, MT/Houston, Tx
    Posts
    543

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    And as posted earlier, this lovely piece of "fine workmanship" was the next to get deep sixed and replaced with a new one.



    First I tacked the new pieces togeather. And preheated them to between 250 and 300 degrees using an old dodge dually wheel as a fire pit.



    Then I welded it out



    then after post heating and allowing to cool,I tacked the other side on and preheated it.



    Then the cross member the extension cylinder mounts to..



    Everything mocked up and the cross member fixing to be welded.



    grinding out the frame end reinforcements after welding them on.



    The unit installed.


  7. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Livingston, MT/Houston, Tx
    Posts
    543

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    Next up was getting the valve body mounted and hooked up.



    And then the hydraulic tank.



    And then it was functional!





    All said and done the unit had a 63" reach from the tail board, and a lift of 31"

    On the old instalation it was about 52" and was lucky to be able to lift a vehicle over 12"

    And finally a video of it working.



    We didnt have the tail board cut out yet so we could not run the lift through its whole range of motion when the video was taken.

    Overall I am very very pleased with how it turned out. Next up is building a western hauler type bed to run on the truck. Going to be posting that on this thread as well.

  8. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Upstate, South Carolina,USA
    Posts
    38

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    That's purdy cool.I always wondered how those where built and attached to the truck frame.I ran a rollback and never got a chance to try a snatch truck.

  9. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF bay area, CA
    Posts
    2,618

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    Are you going to add any reinforcement to the factory frame rails as they transition under the cab and into the deeper drawn frame rails at the rear? I have seen some of these HD Chevy with some nasty stuff going on with the frame rails in that area. Not as bad as the dodges but i have still seen some broken and cracked rails.
    Vantage 500's LN-25's, VI-400's, cobramatics, Powcon inverters, XMT's, 250 Ton pacific 12' press brake, 1/4" 10' Atlantic shear,Koikie plasma table W/ esab plasmas.
    Lincoln idealarc tig 330A with bernard cooler Sync350LX. Miller migs, marvel saws

  10. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Livingston, MT/Houston, Tx
    Posts
    543

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    Quote Originally Posted by Dualie View Post
    Are you going to add any reinforcement to the factory frame rails as they transition under the cab and into the deeper drawn frame rails at the rear? I have seen some of these HD Chevy with some nasty stuff going on with the frame rails in that area. Not as bad as the dodges but i have still seen some broken and cracked rails.
    Yeah, we are looking for a set of those reinforcing rails, allthough generally the trucks that had the serious issues there had a recovery boom and they were pulling on it really hard.

  11. #36
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Livingston, MT/Houston, Tx
    Posts
    543

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    Quote Originally Posted by ben2go View Post
    That's purdy cool.I always wondered how those where built and attached to the truck frame.I ran a rollback and never got a chance to try a snatch truck.
    Man once you have run one of these, you will never want to go back into a roll back again. I know I wont run one.

  12. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF bay area, CA
    Posts
    2,618

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    I have seen flatbeds and mini dumps with that problem also.
    Vantage 500's LN-25's, VI-400's, cobramatics, Powcon inverters, XMT's, 250 Ton pacific 12' press brake, 1/4" 10' Atlantic shear,Koikie plasma table W/ esab plasmas.
    Lincoln idealarc tig 330A with bernard cooler Sync350LX. Miller migs, marvel saws

  13. #38
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Sugarland, Tejas
    Posts
    149

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    wow so thats how a wrecker is put together... I have been getting more interested in wrecker trucks after watching Wrecked on the Speed Channel
    One day I would like to get a roll back for my shop. That way I can pick up wrecked cars and projects.
    Adam M
    Morales Ranch

  14. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Livingston, MT/Houston, Tx
    Posts
    543

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    Quote Originally Posted by ItsAdam1 View Post
    wow so thats how a wrecker is put together... I have been getting more interested in wrecker trucks after watching Wrecked on the Speed Channel
    One day I would like to get a roll back for my shop. That way I can pick up wrecked cars and projects.
    I watch Wrecked as well, I just hope some day my opperation is that big, id love to have a 75 ton rotator.

    Personally though I wont run a roll off wrecker, they are slow and bulky, with my Dynamic I can snatch a car in less than 10 seconds, have it tied down in less than a minute and be on my way. I piss the flat bed drivers off because I can pull into a dealership at the same time they do to deliver and they are just starting to unload as I am driving away.

    Not to mention the self loader is far more manuverable.





    As you can see I work the snot out of it.

  15. #40
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Sugarland, Tejas
    Posts
    149

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    Kool You've got a PM.......
    Adam M
    Morales Ranch

  16. #41
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Livingston, MT/Houston, Tx
    Posts
    543

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    Quote Originally Posted by ItsAdam1 View Post
    Kool You've got a PM.......
    replied

  17. #42
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    5,726

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    Quote Originally Posted by MrBeast View Post
    . . .Personally though I wont run a roll off wrecker, they are slow and bulky, with my Dynamic I can snatch a car in less than 10 seconds, have it tied down in less than a minute and be on my way. I piss the flat bed drivers off because I can pull into a dealership at the same time they do to deliver and they are just starting to unload as I am driving away.



    As you can see I work the snot out of it.
    I don't know if fast loading time itself is all that. As MrBeast must know, there's a lot more to a towing cycle than loading time alone. It would seem like it takes as long to string tow lights, disconnect a drive shaft, lock a steering wheel, or air-up a low tire, as it does to cycle a tilt-bed. Of course usually with a tilt-bed all of the extras can be skipped; simply winch it on, tie it down, and roll out.

    I'm not damning the tow-type wrecker, just sying that we should at least give the flatbed carrier its due. What happens when the towed vehicle is locked and has no keys? Or if it has a tire or four that won't roll?

    When a carrier arrives for pickup, regardless of the condition of the vehicle to be towed, IE: flat/missing tire, no keys, locked drive-line, bent suspension, dragging or rubbing parts, very low road clearance. . . the list goes on, but anyway, regardless of the towed vehicle's condition, -or even if the cargo doesn't have any wheels- a carrier will probably quickly pull it aboard, and be driving off into the sunset in minutes.

    With a carrier there is no need to fumble with temporary tow lights, no worry about drive line damage to the towed vehicle, no problem with wheels which are cranked or wont roll Once loaded on a carrier, the carrier and load will probably have a shorter overall length, and make for more balanced axle loading than if the same load were towed.

    While flat-towing, a wrecker usually is pulling a heavy "brake-less trailer" mostly as an over-hung load with most all of the cargo's weight situated behind the drive axle. Heavy overhung loads tend to want to "push-around" the tow vehicle. Heavy overhung loads also tend to unload the steering axle and thus this limits the steer axle's ability to help with braking, especially during fast stops, and on slippery roads. Of course a light steer axle also reduces the drive axle's braking ability. If you've ever experienced that spine-tingling feeling that a skidding steer axle can give, then you know what I mean.

    Meanwhile, a carrier's cargo can usually be loaded so as to properly proportion the weight between front and rear axles. Without a "brake-less trailer" in unknown mechanical condition in tow, and with a safely loaded steer axle, a loaded carrier can comfortably run at speed, and still be very safely maneuvered and stopped.

    Of course none of this takes away from MrBeast's great build, because boom-type and wheel-lift wreckers have their place too. But I'm just speaking up in defense of the flat-bed carrier, and I don't think we should bury the design just yet.

    Good Luck
    Last edited by denrep; 12-25-2009 at 07:22 PM.

  18. #43
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Livingston, MT/Houston, Tx
    Posts
    543

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    Quote Originally Posted by denrep View Post
    I don't know if fast loading time itself is all that. As MrBeast must know, there's a lot more to a towing cycle than loading time alone. It would seem like it takes as long to string tow lights, disconnect a drive shaft, lock a steering wheel, or air-up a low tire, as it does to cycle a tilt-bed. Of course usually with a tilt-bed all of the extras can be skipped; simply winch it on, tie it down, and roll out.

    I'm not damning the tow-type wrecker, just sying that we should at least give the flatbed carrier its due. What happens when the towed vehicle is locked and has no keys? Or if it has a tire or four that won't roll?

    When a carrier arrives for pickup, regardless of the condition of the vehicle to be towed, IE: flat/missing tire, no keys, locked drive-line, bent suspension, dragging or rubbing parts, very low road clearance. . . the list goes on, but anyway, regardless of the towed vehicle's condition, -or even if the cargo doesn't have any wheels- a carrier will probably quickly pull it aboard, and be driving off into the sunset in minutes.

    With a carrier there is no need to fumble with temporary tow lights, no worry about drive line damage to the towed vehicle, no problem with wheels which are cranked or wont roll Once loaded on a carrier, the carrier and load will probably have a shorter overall length, and make for more balanced axle loading than if the same load were towed.

    While flat-towing, a wrecker usually is pulling a heavy "brake-less trailer" mostly as an over-hung load with most all of the cargo's weight situated behind the drive axle. Heavy overhung loads tend to want to "push-around" the tow vehicle. Heavy overhung loads also tend to unload the steering axle and thus this limits the steer axle's ability to help with braking, especially during fast stops, and on slippery roads. Of course a light steer axle also reduces the drive axle's braking ability. If you've ever experienced that spine-tingling feeling that a skidding steer axle can give, then you know what I mean.

    Meanwhile, a carrier's cargo can usually be loaded so as to properly proportion the weight between front and rear axles. Without a "brake-less trailer" in unknown mechanical condition in tow, and with a safely loaded steer axle, a loaded carrier can comfortably run at speed, and still be very safely maneuvered and stopped.

    Of course none of this takes away from MrBeast's great build, because boom-type and wheel-lift wreckers have their place too. But I'm just speaking up in defense of the flat-bed carrier, and I don't think we should bury the design just yet.

    Good Luck
    I am going to disagree, it doesnt take that long to throw a set of dollies, and it doesnt take all that long to wrap a seat belt around a steering wheel, or in the case of a vehicle you are towing with out the keys, you can hook a ratchet strap around the rag joint and run it to the opposing frame rail and sinch it down and the wheels wont steer.

    If you look in the photo from the post you quoted, im pulling another 3500 hd that is packed to the gills with parts and tools, empty it is 5600 lbs, it was easily 6,000 as I pulled it, and behind it I had a trailer that weighs about a thousand, with an engine driven welder that weighs about 700, a spare 4L80E and a bunch of steel tubing left over from the job, a spare bumper and a welding table, also some other parts.

    So somwhere between 9 and 10,000 lbs behind me,. I pulled it 230 miles home with out issue.

    Where I really pickup with my truck is that it is much more manuverable in many places, I can get in to pickup a car where you would never dream about being able to do it in a flat bed, and I can unload in places you could never do it in a flat bed.

    The other thing is that when you have a vehicle missing a wheel, like I did last night, I grabbed it with my lift, threw and extra strap on it, and it was business as usual, with a flat bed you would be sitting there pulling on it and pulling on it with a ski, trying to get it over a curb, I picked pulled rehooked and went. it would have taken 45 minutes to an hour to yank that truck out with a flat bed.

    Now I will say that if you are driving a conventional wrecker with standard controls, there really is not an advantage over a flat bed other than being more manuverable. But when you have a truck like I do where you have in cab controls, there is no comparison. Really if I need a flatbed, I bring a trailer most of the time it stays at home though.

  19. #44
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    5,726

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    I'm not telling you what kind of equipment to run, you know best what's right for your business. And no doubt it looks like you definitely know your way around tow trucks..

    I'm just saying that a tilt bed carrier is an extremely versatile truck. So in all fairness we should mention that a proficient flat-bed operator can pull lots of tricks too; including loading wheel-less and locked-up cars, with one fast hook.

    But yes, the HD as seen in the picture is what prompted my comment.
    GVW aside, the truck just looks overloaded. There is probably no way the steer tires could get adequate braking bite in a panic stop situation, especially with a wet or stone-scattered road. During a fast stop the front wheels would likely lock, and then the truck would loose steering ability. Hopefully the driver would be able to release the brakes in order to regain steering, and then find a cheap way around whatever he was braking for.

    No doubt you yourself could probably drive about anything, even through downtown at 5 o'clock, but unfortunately, in business, what you'll find is that you have to dumb-down to the employee, and the public, and the insurance company, and the law. And in a nutshell, what I just mentioned, along with wheel-lift towing, is mostly why you've seen the move to heavier and heavier tow trucks, despite cars getting lighter and lighter.

    Good Luck
    Last edited by denrep; 12-25-2009 at 10:50 PM.

  20. #45
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Livingston, MT/Houston, Tx
    Posts
    543

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    Quote Originally Posted by denrep View Post
    No doubt you yourself could probably drive about anything, even through downtown at 5 o'clock, but unfortunately, in business, what you'll find is that you have to dumb-down to the employee, and the public, and the insurance company, and the law. And in a nutshell, what I just mentioned, along with wheel-lift towing, is mostly why you've seen the move to heavier and heavier tow trucks, despite cars getting lighter and lighter.
    True that, and I will note, I started on a flat bed and moved into a conventional.

    That being said you can stick any idiot behind the wheel of a truck, but that doesnt make him a professional truck driver, many are just overglorified professional steering wheel holders. This is why I think the auto shift transmission is one of the worst things to ever happen to the trucking industry.

  21. #46
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF bay area, CA
    Posts
    2,618

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    well i will chime in a bit here. IF i was a one truck car towing operation hands down the carrier would be the way i would roll. PERIOD.

    A Repo operation needs a repo truck. A self loader like he's building here, I'm partial to the dynamic self loader, but the eagle claw and others are well respected through the industry. there are guys out there pushing the outside of the safety envelop with self loaders every day i would say that the above picture is a bit out side of the 4,000lb lift rating and 8,000 tow rating of that particular unit.

    Honestly i would like to see slide in units and hidden under lifts outlawed as theres way to many Jackovs snatching 3/4 and 1 ton trucks with 2500 Chevy SRW trucks and its only a matter of time before someone is killed.

    The unit being built appears to be a Vulcan wheel lift with strapless spoons. while the Vulcan spoons are pretty much fool proof for strapless towing in many areas its technically illegal to run with out securing the wheels into the spoons which pretty much defeats the purpose of the Vulcan spoons all together.

    The most versatile unit i have ever seen was a guy local to us here had a Peterbilt 379 short hood with a 26 NRC 40K rated rollback deck, a National 20 ton knuckle boom mounted behind the cab, and an NRC 20,000lb under reach.

    It could do recovery's, load transfers and shifts, recovery's, and had an Under reach that would tow loaded garbage trucks from the front and still maintain the fed min 50% front axle weight. The knuckle boom was a great counterweight. with floats on the front and full locking diffs it got around great off road. he had over $200K wrapped up in it but it was as versatile as $400K worth of other equipment.

    If i was buying a wheel lift today it would with out a doubt be a peterbilt 335 with a B&B 16 ton deck on it or a century 3212 deck.
    Vantage 500's LN-25's, VI-400's, cobramatics, Powcon inverters, XMT's, 250 Ton pacific 12' press brake, 1/4" 10' Atlantic shear,Koikie plasma table W/ esab plasmas.
    Lincoln idealarc tig 330A with bernard cooler Sync350LX. Miller migs, marvel saws

  22. #47
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    39

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    nice work .... i must appreciate forks work ..... looks like ambitious and loving piece of work is done as well as the truck also does pretty nice when it comes to handling weight, it does have some limitations, but I have yet to wind up not being able to tow anything I was called out to...........:P :P :P

  23. #48
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Livingston, MT/Houston, Tx
    Posts
    543

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    Quote Originally Posted by Dualie View Post
    well i will chime in a bit here. IF i was a one truck car towing operation hands down the carrier would be the way i would roll. PERIOD.

    A Repo operation needs a repo truck. A self loader like he's building here, I'm partial to the dynamic self loader, but the eagle claw and others are well respected through the industry. there are guys out there pushing the outside of the safety envelop with self loaders every day i would say that the above picture is a bit out side of the 4,000lb lift rating and 8,000 tow rating of that particular unit.

    Honestly i would like to see slide in units and hidden under lifts outlawed as theres way to many Jackovs snatching 3/4 and 1 ton trucks with 2500 Chevy SRW trucks and its only a matter of time before someone is killed.

    The unit being built appears to be a Vulcan wheel lift with strapless spoons. while the Vulcan spoons are pretty much fool proof for strapless towing in many areas its technically illegal to run with out securing the wheels into the spoons which pretty much defeats the purpose of the Vulcan spoons all together.

    The most versatile unit i have ever seen was a guy local to us here had a Peterbilt 379 short hood with a 26 NRC 40K rated rollback deck, a National 20 ton knuckle boom mounted behind the cab, and an NRC 20,000lb under reach.

    It could do recovery's, load transfers and shifts, recovery's, and had an Under reach that would tow loaded garbage trucks from the front and still maintain the fed min 50% front axle weight. The knuckle boom was a great counterweight. with floats on the front and full locking diffs it got around great off road. he had over $200K wrapped up in it but it was as versatile as $400K worth of other equipment.

    If i was buying a wheel lift today it would with out a doubt be a peterbilt 335 with a B&B 16 ton deck on it or a century 3212 deck.
    This unit is actually a Sneeker, it is very well built, it just as an old set of Jerr Dan spoons and recivers on it because some one wrecked the original sneeker L arms. Next month I am going to build a new set after I can take measurements off of a friends truck.

    I love my dynamic, you will never see me run an eagle claw, they are junk.

    On my new wrecker I am going to run a sneeker on it built on a similar frame, and it will have a western hauler style body so the truck can be used to tow trailers as well.With a 40' flat bed the truck will be able to haul 2 cars, and with my lower ramp angle on the trailer, I will be able to load things on there that you can not load on a carrier. I designed my trailer so you can load a Z06 with the front skirt still on it.

  24. #49
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF bay area, CA
    Posts
    2,618

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    A good operator can load the lowest clearance vehicle ever made on any carrier damage free. Sometimes you have to use every tool in the box to get it done.
    Vantage 500's LN-25's, VI-400's, cobramatics, Powcon inverters, XMT's, 250 Ton pacific 12' press brake, 1/4" 10' Atlantic shear,Koikie plasma table W/ esab plasmas.
    Lincoln idealarc tig 330A with bernard cooler Sync350LX. Miller migs, marvel saws

  25. #50
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Walker, LA
    Posts
    89

    Re: Building a repo wrecker, and an intro

    I've been keeping up with this truck on FSC, very awesome.
    Lincoln Promig 180

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
RSS | Home | Penton Media | Contact Us | Subscribe | For Advertisers | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement