Arc vs. Flux Wire Welder
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  1. #1
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    Arc vs. Flux Wire Welder

    Which is better, Arc Welder or Flux Wire Welder? Not being used for any major welding. Anywhere from 3/16 to 1/4 inch.

  2. #2
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    Re: Arc vs. Flux Wire Welder

    delete
    Last edited by 99trxrider; 01-03-2010 at 01:26 PM.

  3. #3
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    Re: Arc vs. Flux Wire Welder

    it will depend, What voltage is the wire welder? 110 or 220. that will make all the difference. If its a 110 than a 220 stick welder will be way better all around. if its a 220 volt wire welder than its a toss up. it wont be any cleaner than stick because of the flux on the wire. What is the amperage of the wire welder? I would prefer a stick welder but that is just me. What are you most comfortable with?

  4. #4
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    Re: Arc vs. Flux Wire Welder

    I'm new with all welding. Just trying to figure out what to start with. I wouldn't be welding a lot. I have a boat trailer that needs some welding done to it. I just want to learn to do some welding.

  5. #5
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    Re: Arc vs. Flux Wire Welder

    oops..didnt think the first post actually posted..Have you ever welded before? What needs to be welded on the trailer? Not trying to be a jack *** but generally if youve never welded before you dont want to begin on something thats going to be going down the road. I learned to weld with stick but most people i have talked to have told me they found wire welding easier to learn on than stick. 220 volt is def. the way to go though. There are a lot more people on here that could help you better than I could being as how im only 18. Im just putting down my thoughts.

  6. #6
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    Re: Arc vs. Flux Wire Welder

    On the money side you can buy a good 220v AC or even an AC/DC stick machine for usually way less than you can a similar powered 220v FC wire rig.

    On the other side, it's usually easier for most to learn on a wire feed machine (mig or FC) than on stick, especially if they don't have someone to help them learn.

    Each machine has good and bad points. Personally I'd rather have a good 220v 200 amp wire feed than a stick machine if I could only have one. That said I started out with a cheap AC craftsman that I got at a very good price. I used that and then an AC/DC Thunderbolt to do heavy steel for a long time before I could afford to buy a similar powered wire feed machine.


    Oh BTW they are both arc welders. And I agree, trailers are not a good starter project usually. If the plan involves anything having to do with the frame, suspension, tongue and any structural parts of the trailer, it's really an advanced project that should wait until you know what you are really doing.
    Last edited by DSW; 01-03-2010 at 01:38 PM.
    .



    No government ever voluntarily reduces itself in size. Government programs, once launched, never disappear. Actually, a government bureau is the nearest thing to eternal life we'll ever see on this earth!

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  7. #7
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    Re: Arc vs. Flux Wire Welder

    The problem is that once you start welding you’ll find new projects to grow into and the unit you started with will be under powered.
    The rule of thumb of 1 amp per 0.001 inch of stock is a good place to start; 1/8 inch requires 125 amps which is approaching the upper limit of a 120 volt mig, 230 volt units gives you 140 to 250+ amps. Need to weld something thick, then the larger units will allow multi pass? You not making a living from welding makes duty cycle less critical, 30 to 40 % should be fine. I would not limit myself to self-shelding flux core wire only, never can tell when you’ll need to weld aluminum or stainless steel, so you’ll need gas.

  8. #8
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    Re: Arc vs. Flux Wire Welder

    I definitely wouldn't being welding on the frame or any parts with axles attached to them, just some other light duty brackets. I can only plug into a 110 outlet. I don't have a 220 outlet.

  9. #9
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    Re: Arc vs. Flux Wire Welder

    Unfortunately with only a 110v outlet you will be very limited. You can scratch any cheap stick machine off you list. They really don't do much at all. A good (read expensive) inverter stick setup like a miller Maxstar150 or TD150 will be the best type of machine on a limited power source. The down side is they cost big money. A even a good 110v wire feed like a MM211 will be very limited on a 110v line. With FC wire you can probably figure 3/16" at max on 110v power.

    At best most small wire feeds are good for sheetmetal (mig with gas) to maybe 1/8" to 3/16" with FC. If you are willing to be very limited that might be an option. Personally I don't recomend it, with the posible exception of the MM211 that can do both 110v/220v.

    You may need to think outside the box to get 220v power. Most electric stoves and dryers are 220v. Often guys make extension cords to use this to power a welder. Thats what I did for years in an apartment to run mine. You may find that it's not as hard as you think to get 220v from a panel, you just have to have the electrician do it. A small genset (4.5kw+)will run most low end 220v wire feed machines in the 180-200 amp class.
    .



    No government ever voluntarily reduces itself in size. Government programs, once launched, never disappear. Actually, a government bureau is the nearest thing to eternal life we'll ever see on this earth!

    Ronald Reagan

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