Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires
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  1. #1
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    Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    An important safety video for those of us who weld on vehicles. We'll worth watching this 9minute video if you do any work on tires, welding or just wrenching.




    Found the link to this originally on the AWS forum.
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  2. #2
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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    I’ll pass this on to Bus Safety Monday.

  3. #3
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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    Here is a portion of my original post on a different forum, with another link, besides the one you already have. Check it out.
    And yes I can copy and past this because I'm the orignal author.
    This chemical reaction is called "Pyrolosis".

    "Quote"
    I have welded many rims and wheels in my career, and never not once was I ever inclined to weld on a rim/wheel with the tire still on it. First of all, if a rim is leaking air from a crack, you really need to get to both sides to properly repair it. If one thinks he's going to get a really good weld with the tire on, then he's got some lessons to learn. Watch this safety video about Pyrolosis. It's what happens to the tire when you attempt to work/heat the rim.

    (Continue from different thread)
    Your right! Man how far did that test dummy fly??? Let me clarify also, that when a person brings a steel rim to me I simply tell them to go to the salvage yard and get a new one. It's actually cheaper to buy a new/used rim than to pay me my welding rates. It's not even economically feasable to try and repair them. Steel rims are very brittle and the heat/cooling degrades that portion which has been welded.

    On the other hand, I have successfully repaired many aluminum rims. The first one was from a guy who raced stock cars. He was running aluminum rims and had contact with the wall or another car, I'm not sure. Broke a big chunk out of the bead area. About 7"-8" busted out. This was back in "76" and I was getting pretty cocky with my aluminum tig, but I told him no. I tried to convince him to do something else, but not weld on it. He said he had checked every salvage yard in town and couldn't find the one he "had to have". He practically begged me to try! I told him if he could find another rim with the same shape of inner/outer bead area?, I don't know what that's called?, That I could try and add a new piece in. Well to make a short story long. He came up with another rim similar, close enough to match. I cut out the piece to match the cavity of the broken one, beveled everything and welded it with 4043. Front and back. Then I filed the part where the tire has to seal and shaped it to conform with the original shape. Sanded it down real good and left the bead on the front side, untouched. Aluminum is always stronger if you leave as much build-up as you can. That's why in most cases doing repair aluminum you want to have a not only good weld but also a pretty bead so you don't have to grind a mess away.

    Anyway, he put the wheel back on his race car and ran it every week for the entire race season and the rim held out just fine. It held air, and never broke. I would check with him about every couple of weeks or so and he would tell me it's working fine. I admit I was a bit nervous never doing it before, and I was never sure it would hold. To be honest, I figured it would break after the first race.

    I don't know how many aluminum rims I've repaired since then, but it is many, and have only turned a few away. These newer ones aren't as easy to work on as the older ones. These new rims are higher alloyed and a lot harder than what they used to make. Also a lot of these newer rims are harder to shape and file. I'm thinking the last rim I worked on I had to use 5356 as a filler. The rim was as hard as steel, almost. I don't feel real comfortable with those. I'd need to see some more successful repairs on them in order to feel confident in it's repairability. Also on the harder rims it's better to send them off to a machine shop so they can turn it and get it perfectly round. I don't have that capability. Actually, every wheel should be done that way. But sometimes people don't care how it looks, just as long as it holds air and they can get there 350 dollar rim fixed for 50.00, is a pretty good pursuader.

    Check out this link!


    Take Care,
    Steve

  4. #4
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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    Steve,

    Thanks for posting the Michelin test video. I saw your post on the AWS forum, but didn't make the connection between that and your posts here.

    In a strange twist of fate, I got a call about 2 hours ago from somebody that wanted me to come out and heat a couple lug stuck nuts on an aluminum wheel, and perhaps torch them off if the heating didn't loosen them. He explained that the nuts were loose on the studs, and the studs where loose on the hub. He' tried wrenching them off, with vise grips on the base of teh stud, but they just wouldn't come completely off. I passed on the job, after suggesting that they use a dremel to split those lug nuts and just replace them and the studs. I hope they do this, or tow the vehicle to a tire shop and let the pros take a crack at it. IT's either that, or break out the bead breakers and try to lever that tire off the rim with it still mounted to the vehicle. Definitely not my first choice...

    Can't help but wonder if the person I spoke to didn't see this posting before they decided to call. I should have asked....
    Mobile Welding at your worksite or place of business. Serving Dayton, Ohio and the surrounding metro areas.
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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    Good advice. The only best way would be to cut with dremmel, die grinder. Should'nt create too much heat if you make it quick. No telling how many got lucky, using a torch to slice studs. Probably in most cases, not too much to worry about, if you don't get the rim hot! I think on one of those videos once the interior temp reached about 700 degrees, the temparature rose extremely fast, like exponential. Keep in mind, they did have to actually get the rim pretty hot before the pyrolosis set in. Leave it to a pro to determine the dangers. Sometimes a welder has to do what he has to do, so some other less experienced welder doesn't kill himself and others.

    Take Care
    Steve

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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    A dremel's about the only thing small enough to get into the hub area, I figure.

    The video I linked to showed the pyrolysis starting when the internal temp of the tire was around 200F; much lower than you might expect. They blew up the tire by welding with a single stick electrode(looked like a 3/32" or 1/8" rod) across the web of the truck rim, no where near the tire itself....

    According to the speaker in the video, the time for an explosion to occur is usually a few minutes, but they had documented one case where the reaction took 22 hours! to 'complete'.

    Quote Originally Posted by mtlmster View Post
    Good advice. The only best way would be to cut with dremmel, die grinder. Should'nt create too much heat if you make it quick. No telling how many got lucky, using a torch to slice studs. Probably in most cases, not too much to worry about, if you don't get the rim hot! I think on one of those videos once the interior temp reached about 700 degrees, the temparature rose extremely fast, like exponential. Keep in mind, they did have to actually get the rim pretty hot before the pyrolosis set in. Leave it to a pro to determine the dangers. Sometimes a welder has to do what he has to do, so some other less experienced welder doesn't kill himself and others.

    Take Care
    Steve
    Mobile Welding at your worksite or place of business. Serving Dayton, Ohio and the surrounding metro areas.
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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    Yea, that's right. Probably ought to go back and watch again.

    Do you post on the other forum? Same user name?

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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    Same name, but I rarely post on the AWS forum. Very volatile group over there, with strong opinions and not shy about sharing them. Life is too short...

    Quote Originally Posted by mtlmster View Post
    Yea, that's right. Probably ought to go back and watch again.

    Do you post on the other forum? Same user name?
    Mobile Welding at your worksite or place of business. Serving Dayton, Ohio and the surrounding metro areas.
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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    Quote Originally Posted by A_DAB_will_do View Post
    Same name, but I rarely post on the AWS forum. Very volatile group over there, with strong opinions and not shy about sharing them. Life is too short...
    Hey DAB,

    Ain't that the truth. I lurked and read their threads for a month before I ever got the nerve to even sign up. But, I have been welding over 35 years and taken a lot of abuse from other welders, customers, bosses and whoever one might think of.

    When I first posted there, I sensed quite a bit of sarcasm, and still do occasionally, even one guy kind of tried to discredit my user name. Well, that was a sensitive spot for me, because I was given that name by one of my helpers and have been using it for years. It's not because I think I'm a "METALMASTER", it was just available when I started doing stuff on the computer and it has stuck. I hope everyone everywhere will recognize my handle as "mtlmster" all lower case, and humbly my own handle.

    I simply jumped back on a few guys and told them the truth and that I thought they were mistaken, because they didn't even know me. How can one critisize one when one doesn't even know who they are talking to.

    I absolutely refuse to be intimidated by those guys, and some of them will occasionally send me a PM to encourage me. I do the same occasionally when I sense the big dogs coming out. They have a tendancy to gang up on a guy when they smell blood. Therefore when posting on AWS Forum, one must be careful how he words things, and should have a somewhat humble attitude so it can be read in the thread. One must also do his research to make sure he is correct in his thread.

    Therefore, I encourage you or anyone else to feel free to post anywhere you want. We do these forums for stress release, education, safety, and every now and then just for fun.

    I did notice that even on this forum that some people really jumped on the guy who was wanting to set up an "Awesome Welding Rig". Obviously a beginner welder, but he had the balls to ask what others thought. I hope these big dogs here didn't flat run him off!

    I generally try to keep my thread focused on past experience. That is hard to challenge. If you will notice, a lot of those guy's give cookie cutter responses, because they don't have actual experience, and all they know is what they read when they did some google research, and they are totally factual, copied and pasted from manufacturers recommendations. That's fine, and has it's place, but I would rather hear what a guy has learned from his experiences rather than what he plagerized.

    I hope you guys will welcome me here also. I feel I have a lot of good/bad experiences in the welding trade, and I am willing to share it with you. I do not know everything, don't claim to. I'm really just a "dum-ol-welder" who is retiring now and have a little extra time to get online and discuss shop talk. Don't always feel like writing, but sometimes I can talk your ear off like I just did right here. Anyway, glad to meet you guys, and I hope we can have some productive dialogue between us.

    Take Care
    Steve

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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    I have to say I am glad this was posted. I never weld on rims. But I dont know how many times I have heated lugs to get off the nut. I guess I have a greater purpose here that I am not aware of yet. Thanks a lot guys. Oh yea hey mtlmster, Welcome.
    Last edited by jreynoldswelding; 03-08-2010 at 03:26 PM.

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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    Quote Originally Posted by A_DAB_will_do View Post
    Same name, but I rarely post on the AWS forum. Very volatile group over there, with strong opinions and not shy about sharing them. Life is too short...
    OUCH!

    Yeah it can get pretty rough/heated over there at times. We are very code/safety orientated. It is a little different. But there are bullies on every forum, it is just how one deals with it. AWS is a tight knit community but for the most part we all welcome everyone in that is willing to learn and put in the effort as well as take constructive criticism/advice. I truly hope you will not take the few bullies and let them spoil it for you. It happens on every forum, I have seen some pretty brutal beatings on every welding forum for minor infractions. Life goes on.

    Anyways, not trying to convert anyone. I am a member of many welding forums and try to contribute when and where I can. AWS is my first one though as I am an AWS member as well as an AWS CWI.

    Respectfully,
    jrw159

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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    Nobody runs me off of an internet forum. But life is too short to spend it arguing with someone over the internet. So I try not to play into the games that some folks enjoy. There are plenty of people out there who are contentious, and like to stir the pot just for their own amusment. I'm constantly amazed at the tone that folks will take with a complete stranger over the internet. People will say things in print that they'd never say face to face. They remind me of a small dog that barks at everything from behind the protection of their backyard fence...

    This whole issue of welding/heating wheels is one of safety, and it's something I'm sure a great many people have done; without thinking twice. It's also probably one of those things that works OK 99 times out of 100. Just like welding on closed containers without good purge procedures, or working in confined spaces without proper ventilation. But even those odds aren't worth the consequences, in my opinion.

    Mtlmstr posted a good, well-thought-out test that proves the dangers involved. The fact that 2 tire manufacturers conducted tests and achieved similiar results is proof enough for me. This is the kind of information I find worthwhile sharing...

    Quote Originally Posted by jrw159 View Post
    OUCH!

    Yeah it can get pretty rough/heated over there at times. We are very code/safety orientated. It is a little different. But there are bullies on every forum, it is just how one deals with it. AWS is a tight knit community but for the most part we all welcome everyone in that is willing to learn and put in the effort as well as take constructive criticism/advice. I truly hope you will not take the few bullies and let them spoil it for you. It happens on every forum, I have seen some pretty brutal beatings on every welding forum for minor infractions. Life goes on.

    Anyways, not trying to convert anyone. I am a member of many welding forums and try to contribute when and where I can. AWS is my first one though as I am an AWS member as well as an AWS CWI.

    Respectfully,
    jrw159
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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    "But even those odds aren't worth the consequences, in my opinion."

    "This is the kind of information I find worthwhile sharing..."

    I could not agree more.

    And yes, there are "clowns" and "keyboard warriors" as well as those that can do little more than bash at someone and offer no constructive advice. And they are on EVERY forum. Some of them I look forward to having the opportunity to meet face to face.

    As for me and anyone I am directly responsible for, there will be no welding or heating done to a rim with a tire mounted on it. I knew before seeing this that it is a dangerous practice, but as with everything, seeing it happen really drives it home.

    Best regards,
    jrw159

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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    Hey, JReynolds, A-DAB, & jrw159.

    Thanks for the welcome JRey. Hey jrw159. We meet again. Great to see you again. I want to let you guys know that jrw159 is a good guy, and he knows what he's talking about. A very good writer. A friendly person and helpful.

    I think what happens by conversing through notes and letters, that people write what is in there head without actually saying it out loud, so one can also here himself, as in an actual face to face conversation. Whether via, forum, email, blog, whatever your communication media, it is somewhat impersonal. People will write comments and say things that they would never consider saying to someone's face. Also communicating through the electronic media, which by it's own nature, is somewhat charged emotionally, even before one even signs in/up. Each individual has his own ideals, background experience, different areas of the country/world, different cultures, etc, etc.

    It amazes me, that so many tradesmen and professionals and others, who's primary influence, is his trade and livelihood, speaking out on a forum, and it remain respectful and informative and civil. The main thing missing in typed notes are eyes, hand gestures, voice/tonal inflection, stance and other perrsonal traights. These can't be seen in a note unless someone actually described his honest feelings. And I would guess you get about 95% good info and discussion, and about 3% regrettable dialogue. That's really not that bad, considering the various backgrounds!

    For me personally, it is a stress reliever and it keeps me connected with the welders and welding professionals and I can find out just about anything I need to know about welding. That is how I intend to use these forums. I have signed up for six forums, but am only active in two; AWS and this one.

    I did last weekend send one of the moderators or administrators a note and some questions and have not received any response that I know of. I'm still trying to figure how to manauver through this website/forum. I can't find the note I sent him, so it may not have gone anywhere.

    Now as far as that job offered to you A DAB, where they have the loose studs on the drum/rotor and can't get the aluminum wheel off. You guys are probably going to let me have it, but I would fix it for them. It would be under my strict guidlines and supervision, and the customer will help. Since it is such a dangerous job every consideration and caution should be gone over and even to some extent rehearsed for speed, angle, tolerance, etc. First thing I'm going to ask him. "Do you care if I destroy your tire"? If he says he will get a new tire, then I would cut it off, at least most of it, then commince to the task at hand of cutting the nuts and studs off with a torch. Another criteria for the customer to accept, is that I am going to cut both the nut and the stud off all at one time. If they say they don't want the stud ruined or insist that I try and heat the nut to loosen it, then I will decline the job. Chances are real good that if a lugnut is stuck something is cross threaded and the studs need to be replaced anyway. There not that expensive.

    Now, if let's say we can't destroy the tire. I would have the customer bring in his water hose with a nozzle, so we have immediate access to water. I would definately remove the valve stem, and if possible break the bead seal on the rim. If for some reason I couldn't break the seal, then I would have my torch cranked hot; 40-45 lbs oxy and 5-6 lbs of acy. I would get me a good flame and slice both the stud and nut off at the same time. Take about 5-10 seconds. I would then have them water down the rim and tire and completely cool the rim. Repeat second, third in same manner. One can cut those off. The rim never really gets that hot. Of course you have to aim the flame away from the rim. I would charge the guy $50.00. I've done it before, and I'll do it again. The deal is, don't get the rim hot and it won't explode.

    I've worked on much more danderous jobs than that. I've welded on/in more used fuel tanks than you can shake a stick at. That is a story I'm saving for my blog over in the AWS forum. When I first got into the real serious welding business, I had to repair 600 gl fuel tanks that were leaking. They held either gasoline, deisel, or jet fuel.

    Got to go to work,
    Steve

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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    Steve,
    Hello again! Good to hear from you. I look forward to the next addition to your blog. You have a PM over there about helping you with your avatar.

    Best regards,
    jrw159

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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    Hi Steve,

    I don't see any need to 'let you have it'. I could have done as you suggested, however, intuitio told me this fellow wasn't ready to pay my rates for me to come out and do the job anyway. He had all the tools to cut off the nuts and replace the wheel studs. So I gave him some helpful advice and he went on his way.

    I'm doubting the fellow who called me would have wanted the tire cut off the rim. just a hunch. The rim was cast aluminum, which I would be real reluctant to use a cutting torch around for fear of melting/damaging the rim.

    In regards to your suggestion for having a hose handy, breaking the bead seal on the rim, and taking the valve stem out....watch that bridgestone video again. Towards the end the speaker mentions that in another catastrophic failure the men involved had taken the last two of those precautions. The pressure rise in the tire was so rapid that the gases inside couldn't escape fast enough from the valve stem hole. The tire pressure still went up, and the tire re-seated itself on the rim! And then proceeded to blow up anyway. Granted, you'd know something bad was happening and could probably get to a safe distance this way.

    Keep the safety tips coming, as I'm sure the forum readers haven't seen all of them...
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  17. #17
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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    Quote Originally Posted by mtlmster View Post
    . . .Now as far as that job offered to you A DAB, where they have the loose studs on the drum/rotor and can't get the aluminum wheel off. You guys are probably going to let me have it, but I would fix it for them. . . .
    Yup, gonna let you have it.

    There's no need to get so brutal removing a truck wheel.
    The scenario DAB describes in post #4 is a common occurrence, which can be easily and safely remedied without further damage to expensive components.

    Unnecessarily replacing wheel components is costly work that should be avoided when not necessary. For example, it's not unusual for an assembly to need a nut only, while the respective stud and hole are perfectly fine; particularly with Budd-type mounts.

    It probably wouldn't be doing the truck's owner a favor to do a $50.00 "cut-off" extraction. Better to refer the job to a truck tire specialist, for whom this is everyday work. An experienced tire professional would safely remove/separate the bad hardware without further damage to the tire or adjacent components.

    As to the pyrolysis to which the video explosions are attributed, that would be impossible to achieve by typical shop-work type localized heating, in a disc wheel's mounting hardware area.

    I guess this all underscores that wheel work is best left to those with the specific relevant experience.

    Good Luck
    Last edited by denrep; 03-10-2010 at 01:25 PM.

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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    A-DAB,
    What about wedging something between the tire and rim in three to four places to prevent it from seating.

    jrw159

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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    That would probably work just fine, JRW.

    But breaking the bead seal on a passenger car tire, while it's stuck on the vehicle, sounds like more work to me than using a dremel with a cut-off wheel to split the offending lug nut(s).

    Just goes to show there's more than one way to get the job done....

    Denrep, we're crossing a lot of territory here, as the discussion has ranged from commercial truck wheels with Steel rims to passenger car wheels with cast aluminum rims. I think that methods and tools that work for one application may not for the other.

    I'm uncertain just how much heat it really takes to start a catastrophic failure like those shown in the Utube videos. It does seem like there's no easy way to tell when hot becomes too hot. Under those types of conditions I'm going to err on the side of caution....

    Quote Originally Posted by jrw159 View Post
    A-DAB,
    What about wedging something between the tire and rim in three to four places to prevent it from seating.

    jrw159
    Mobile Welding at your worksite or place of business. Serving Dayton, Ohio and the surrounding metro areas.
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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    Sorry Dab, that sounded exactly like the description of a typical Budd-type double nut problem. But on that note, I recently sliced the locks off of a Lincoln car's aluminum wheels for a buddy. No wheel or stud damage. The locking nuts were buried so deep in the wheel that there's no way a cutting tool could reach them.

    Good Luck

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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    Hey Ya'll: Good conversation, Good dialogue. I just about recon we've beat this horse to death. There may be others out there reading. denrep, appreciate your input. I'll be trying to think of some other situations I've been into, and how I got out of. Looking forward to some more good chat.

    I'll invite you guys to read my blog over on AWS forum. Feel free to respond also. It really makes my day getting to talk to you guys. Ever since I retired from my welding job with the government, I've been missing the stories and shop talk.

    I guess the most important thing to remember is that these posts have brought attention to safety, which btw is one of my passions. I rarely take on a job that I don't study very close, and try to imagine all possible outcomes to my situation. I hope people reading this take heed to this discussion, because there are a lot of guys out there that wouldn't give it a thought. I don't even remember what I was doing when I ran across that original video, but I'm glad I did, because I had never even heard of pyrolosis, and didn't have any earthly idea that a hot wheel would cause that. I have learned alot, and that's the point!

    Take care,
    Steve

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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    Post a photo the next time you do this, or a sketch of how this is done. I can't picture in my head how this works. Maybe start a new thread since think steve is right and we've worked this over enough here.

    Quote Originally Posted by denrep View Post
    Sorry Dab, that sounded exactly like the description of a typical Budd-type double nut problem. But on that note, I recently sliced the locks off of a Lincoln car's aluminum wheels for a buddy. No wheel or stud damage. The locking nuts were buried so deep in the wheel that there's no way a cutting tool could reach them.

    Good Luck
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    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    Dab - I sort of think I did previously post both the Budd double-nut separation technique, and the aluminum wheel lock cut. When I get a minute and feel like file searching, I'll poke around and try to find the pictures.

    No doubt this is a good thread, raising tire safety awareness. Tire handling and inspection is very dangerous business.

    What I think is a more immediate danger than pyrolysis, is the explosion of hydrocarbon residue in a tire. The source of the residue could be from previous bead seating attempts, or from aerosol tire sealers. I would think that when a broken-down tire suddenly re-seats and then explodes, it's not caused by slow acting pyrolysis.

    I missed the actual sight, but I was in the same building with two men working on a tire when I heard the tire go off. I ran to the tire, and was I ever glad to see both men on their feet and stumbling around - only dazed. The tire was so shredded that it looked like it had been driven flat for miles.

    One very important safety point to remember is to avoid the bead side of tires. Especially tires which has been recently mounted or recently damaged. This one simple precaution greatly reduces your chances of injury from an explosion.

    Another point: If you ever hear a creaking sort of tearing "zipper" sound, get away immediately. Don't stop to take the chuck off of the stem, or to think twice about anything, just get away. The "zipper" sound may be the cords of the tire starting to rip one by one.

    Good Luck
    Last edited by denrep; 03-10-2010 at 08:30 PM.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Frederick MD
    Posts
    96

    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    this was really informative thanks for posting this .. had never heard of pyrolosis before

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Sacramento, Calif
    Posts
    154

    Re: Dangers of welding/working on vehicle wheels/tires

    ...Well....Guess I'll put in my 2 cents worth.....I've welded on plenty of steel and aluminum wheels in the past 30 years, but it never, ever occurred to me that you'd want to do it without removing the tires....1st, safety, and wouldn't you want to see the damage inside the rim anyway?? Let alone posssibly damaging the tire itself by the welding....
    Tires are made of 30% or more oil, so they'll start to smoulder and burn easily at 250-300 degrees, and plenty of oxygen available in the 100 PSI air ........and of course the aerosol 'sealer' things are usually some kind butane for the propellant....let alone the ether starting fluid guys use to mount big tires... ...even though it says not to right on the can....
    Aluminum wheels now days are usually forged for the big trucks....or on the high $$ custom cars, rims machined from billet of 6061, then welded to a CNC machined center section, made also from 6061....which is why they are 'hard'....not all that weldable (use 5356)..Some really high dollar wheels are all one large piece of material, then CNC machined........older aluminum rims usually were sandcast (356), and some the newer cheaper ones are generally sand or die cast... or 'centers' are die-cast, then welded onto rims that are roll-formed from strip... sand-cast, welds easily ....die-cast...harder to repair....need to use 5356, due to 8-10% magnesium in the alloy of the die-cast....die-cast very difficult to polish and hide repairs...
    The powerlines?....tires also contain a good deal of carbon (that's what makes them black) ....so will conduct electricity and burn.....if the voltage is high enough...

    Some years ago I went for a job interview in a small welding/fab shop....business owner seemed normal in physical and mental condition...
    Then, about 6-7 years later, I saw the same guy....now 35-40 years old...walking slowly with crutches...and could barely speak, very slowly....seems the guy tried welding on an aluminum rim with tire on it...no pressure in there, but the thing blew up anyway....destroyed about 1/2 of his brain....took him a couple years to be able to walk and talk again.....and of course he never actually worked... ever again....
    Shop was 'Angle Fabrication' in Rancho Cordova, Calif....on-line public OSHA records will show this to be a true story...

    Removing stuck lug-nuts??....If I had to burn them...I'd use air-arc....easy to control cut depth, less heat input....or better yet, just drill the center of stud, then break it off, they don't cost that much to re-place...I've done many, on all types of wheels, or on the axles/brake drums actually, cars, trucks, forklifts..............the deal is...
    When you're working with the tires/wheels....don't try to 'cheap out'.....
    Dougspair

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