Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Ningi, Queensland, Australia
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    194

    Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    Hi all, I had a pile of scrap metal which I had been collecting for a while and needed to move some of it as it was getting in the way and I was wondering what to due with it. Anyway I was thinking about it and while I was using the old vice, the thread to tighten it was playing up and the old light bulb lit up. I needed a heavy duty vice!!!

    So here are some pics of the process from junk steel to goodies:

    Pic 1 & 2. Had some wide channel with 12mm sidewall 180mm x 79mm which I reduced to 100mm x 70mm, took out the required width with thin cutting disks on a 5" angle grinder and welded it back together on both sides.

    Pic 3, built the back out of some 12mm flat

    Pic 4, welded up the C channel with a piece of 12mm plate drilled with a 32mm hole flush inside the channel, "V" grooved and welded both sides, added another 12mm plate with 30mm hole in front of it and flush over the outer sides of the C channel, effectively making the front 24mm thick.

    I will have to do several posts because of the number of images.
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  2. #2
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    Nov 2009
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    Ningi, Queensland, Australia
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    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    Pic 5. Had a large steel rod with 30mm x 3.5mm thread on both ends, so cut off the required length, drilled 35mm? hole in a 10mm plate and then made a washer out of it to do the driving plate, lathed out a section in the rod so I could fill it up with weld and then turn it down flush. The metal rod thickness on the other side of the washer is wider than the hole.

    Pic 6. welded the rod and filled the gap with plenty of amps and Voltage, about 350A and 30V. Plenty of penetration.

    Pic 6a. Welded 3 nuts togeter to make onelong nut to give extra squashing power without risk of ripping the threads out, welded a small plate to a section of 16mm base plate, welded the joined long nut to that plate and then also welded a 10mm plate to the sides of the nut and also to the baseplate.

    Pic 7. Basic stage 1 level 1 complete with bar through the rod for turning,

    Pic 8. 12mm Web reinforcing of the first half, The 2 angled pieces were formed by grooving out a wide V section, bending to required angle then welding the groove to fill it up and then welding all around to the c channel. I lost couple of pics so there is more work done than shown, there is a 16mm plate cut for the front wall angled to make it an offset vice and an across to the top of it for the temp placement of the jaws, I actually had to use it as I was building it due to the other one playing up.
    Attached Images Attached Images      
    Miller Auto Invision 456 + S-62 wire feeder
    C6240B1 Gap bed lathe
    16 ft3 air compressor
    16 speed pedestal drill
    Hafco BS-912 Bandsaw

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ningi, Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    194

    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    Pic 9 and 11. (10 was renamed to 6a for better sequencing). Weld on the inside of the vice where that plate joins the c channel. 330A and 28V, all plates on this vice are deeply grooved before welding due to the thickness of them. I had to use the jaws from the old chuck while building this new one so I could use it during it's construction.
    Pic 12


    Pic 13. 16mm plate gets added to the top, welded to the webbing all round and a 12mm plate gets welded to the sides all around to tie it all in
    Pic 13a. repeated it all to do the back of the vice. Added a 16mm section at the rear of the back for use as a anvil, so that section is now 28mm thick, (should take a decent amount of hammering). Here is the first level completed and lugs for the bolts welded to the bottom, there is another bolt hole hidden from view at the back of the plate for bolting down the back of the vice.
    Attached Images Attached Images      
    Miller Auto Invision 456 + S-62 wire feeder
    C6240B1 Gap bed lathe
    16 ft3 air compressor
    16 speed pedestal drill
    Hafco BS-912 Bandsaw

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ningi, Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    194

    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    Pic 13B and 14. The two sections complete to the first level

    Pic 15. Vice nearly complete, slight surface rust due to the condensation from all the rain we had, didn't work on it for a week
    Have added another level. Similar to before and moved the jaws up, added webbing, and welded an angled side and top. This gives clearance when doing tap threading on it so you don't remove skin when turning tapping taps ect.

    Pic 16. Made some changes, changed the handle holder to a square end. This was due to the arrival of my new (used) lathe which enabled me to do it, filled the the handle hole with weld, and lathed it down. Drilled out a larger hole in a 50mm square steel bar to fit over the rod. Placed it over the end and welded it to the rod and also welded the end closed. V'd the ends and added another section of v'd 50mm steel block with a drilled hole for a thicker handle, filled the deep v join between the two blocks flush, ground and sanded flat. There is also another 8mm washer on the inside locked in by a through bolt which pulls out the vice as you turn the handle to open it up

    And finally a paint job to complete it, all pretty now, seems a pity to scratch it up and damage the paint by using it. I think it was a good use of scrap metal which I scrounged out of a recycle bin from a local steel fabricator, total material cost about $60 in wire, gas, paint, 5" cut-off wheels, and a lot of labour but well worth it, should be able to crush steel pipe ends without too much trouble. Total weight about 46Kg and no way is the tread/nut going to wear out on this one!!!

    Anything I would do different if I would do it again, Yes,.... now I have a large lathe I would bore out a hole out of a 50mm square steel and thread that instead of using 3 welded nuts. Much simpler and stronger! but I didn't have that at the time so I used what I had.
    Attached Images Attached Images     
    Miller Auto Invision 456 + S-62 wire feeder
    C6240B1 Gap bed lathe
    16 ft3 air compressor
    16 speed pedestal drill
    Hafco BS-912 Bandsaw

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    sierra mountains
    Posts
    110

    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    A work of art! At first I could not figure out why the offset .Then the light bulb went on! you are a smart fellow.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    sierra mountains
    Posts
    110

    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    Looking twice at it. I think I would have spent some cash for acme threads.
    Then it will last for several generations.
    Why don't vice manufacturers put grease zercs on the nuts?

  7. #7
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    Aug 2009
    Location
    south bend indiana
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    759

    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    WOW, I love home made tools! This is great!
    HH187
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    lots of hand tools

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    2,347

    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    that is great wotk

  9. #9
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    Jul 2009
    Location
    Newark, De
    Posts
    287

    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    Thanks for posting the progress photos, that's a killer vise. I like big vises, but never thought about building one. I'm going to check out my scrap pile.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Corning, NY
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    74

    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    Stuff like this is why i love this site

  11. #11
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    Mar 2010
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    Victoria, BC
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    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    That's brilliant, Ed!!! The offset jaws are super smart!
    200amp Air Liquide MIG, Hypertherm Plasma, Harris torches, Optrel helmet, Makita angle grinders, Pre-China Delta chop saw and belt sander, Miller leathers, shop made jigs etc, North- welders backpack.

  12. #12
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    Mar 2010
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    Morton, Washington
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    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    Very cool vice. The offset is brilliant! Nice paint. Good job.

  13. #13
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    Mar 2010
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    Monroe, Washington
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    284

    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    Excellent work, that looks great!
    Millermatic 135
    Syncrowave 250

  14. #14
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    Mar 2010
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    SW NYS
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    43

    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    Quote Originally Posted by 1-800miner View Post
    Looking twice at it. I think I would have spent some cash for acme threads.
    Then it will last for several generations.
    Why don't vice manufacturers put grease zercs on the nuts?
    Acme threads aren't all that $$$$$$$

    There's not alot of room for grease in a normal thread fit. I think making a small chamber on one end or the other of the nut would allow you to pump it full of grease and keep more in there.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Texas
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    966

    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    Very, very, very, NICE!

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    698

    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    Mmmmm. That's got me thinking.
    Nicely made
    G

  17. #17
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    Apr 2010
    Location
    Hazard KY
    Posts
    15

    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    now that is a work of art. i want one.

  18. #18
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    Dec 2007
    Location
    forest lake minnesota
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    690

    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    nicely done !! That's cool better than pron !!


    Daye

  19. #19

    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    O K FINE! i give, whats the off-set for?

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    92

    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    more versatility in what you can clamp... have never seen this feature in any commercial made vise



    Quote Originally Posted by grnxrymnky View Post
    O K FINE! i give, whats the off-set for?
    Last edited by _CY_; 05-11-2010 at 05:22 AM.
    52, 59 & 66 Lincoln SA200, Tombstone Idealarc 250, Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 50, Marquette 250 amp mig, Miller 330 A/BP

  21. #21
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    Feb 2007
    Location
    jersey
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    282

    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    kudos
    -Graham-
    Mechanical Engineer
    Autosport Mechanic/Fabricator

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    Victoria, BC
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    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    It's brilliant. Might want to look into patenting it. Though might be screwed by putting it out in public domain.
    200amp Air Liquide MIG, Hypertherm Plasma, Harris torches, Optrel helmet, Makita angle grinders, Pre-China Delta chop saw and belt sander, Miller leathers, shop made jigs etc, North- welders backpack.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    23

    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    Dawn make offset vices.

  24. #24
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    Nov 2009
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    Ningi, Queensland, Australia
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    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    Quote Originally Posted by bert the welder View Post
    It's brilliant. Might want to look into patenting it. Though might be screwed by putting it out in public domain.
    Hi, You would be suprised as to what is out there and patented, but not nessecarily in production or available in an area. An item may be commercially produced but for some reason or other not available due to marketing or production reasons. I investigated the patenting procedure for something I invented about 2 years ago, to do a proper patent on anything would cost about $10000 and that is only for Australia, to do one in the States would be about $20000-40000 and so on for every country that you would want to patent it in, and someone still could contest it. Oh! and patent lawyers charge like a wounded bull, you think normal lawyers are bad wait till you see the rates that these guys charge. My wallet seems a bit light for that sort of cash outflow, without any guaranty that I would make any money out of it, I ended up doing a design patent which ended up about $2000 including the searches and still haven't made any money out of it. A friend of mine said he had a brilliant idea and was planning on making a fortune making it. Said he hasn't seen anything like it out there, I did a search and came up with 2 other patents that covered the same sort of thing. That's life! You learn or you go broke LOL.
    Miller Auto Invision 456 + S-62 wire feeder
    C6240B1 Gap bed lathe
    16 ft3 air compressor
    16 speed pedestal drill
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  25. #25
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    Dec 2004
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    Re: Converting scrap metal in to a heavy duty vice

    I'd be proud to have that on my bench. Nice work!
    If you don't want to stand behind our Troops, feel free to stand in front of them.

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