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  1. #151
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Well crap... my post got caught in another Penton mini-crash. Woke up to another 3" of snow this morning but I have been back to creating tools out of junk. I had a 24" x 1 1/4" bolt with a square head in my forging pile to work with while I await better weather for the annealing fire for the deep tiller shank tools. We all keep our anvil edges rounded so we don't mark projects, but what if you needed a square edge for a change? The heal of my RR anvil is kept sharp for that reason, but maybe a Hardy tool would be better for a small project. This is another one that should probably be annealed as the bolt head is already chipped and seems a little on the brittle side.
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  2. #152
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Haven't done much with the new toys yet... the grinder is a beast, but I have to get some coolant for the bandsaw before I tackle any big chunks of metal.
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  3. #153
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    Haven't done much with the new toys yet... the grinder is a beast, but I have to get some coolant for the bandsaw before I tackle any big chunks of metal.
    I got tired of the mess my coolant system made on my bandsaw. I removed the tank/pump and plumbing and it sits on my shelf now.

    I get great results with quality blades (Starrett atm) and a dry lube stick.

    ​Terry

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  4. #154
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    I was looking at the Matrix 2 bi-metal blades at Princess Auto for $60... know if they are any good? Where did you get the dry lube stick? I've never heard of that. It doesn't look like the previous owner used wet lube much either, but I'd guess it's still got the original blade from 2006. The grinder was still in the original shrink wrap packaging and had been on the shelf since 2008. I don't think he's been too active the last 10 yrs. The design of your saw looks VERY similar to the King. This one is set at the 2nd lowest speed... should I go slower with the dry lube?
    Last edited by whtbaron; 04-12-2018 at 08:10 PM.
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  5. #155
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    Blacksmithing tools

    whtbaron:

    I was unable to provide a link but here’s a screenshot of what I use. I bought it from a jobber locally. I would run the saw at normal recommended blade speed with the dry lube. Someone else may have better insight.



    I’m using a Princess Auto blade atm. I’m actually pleased with it. I bought two on sale a couple of years ago so I there’s no guarantee their current inventory is okay or not.

    Hope you’re enjoying your snow. Nice here today.

    Last edited by Lis2323; 04-12-2018 at 08:18 PM.
    ​Terry

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  6. #156
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Thanks for the info... I'll check out the availability of that lube stick locally. So you just pack your snow away with that roller?
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  7. #157
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Yup. Getting old. Easier than shovelling......
    ​Terry

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  8. #158
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    So now I'm thinking a spring loaded tube on each side of the blade (something like a brush holder on an electric motor) to hold 2 of those lube sticks in place.... making more work for myself really is an illness... the brush holder should probably be threaded to keep it rotating as the blade wears it down...
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  9. #159
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    Blacksmithing tools

    Good idea but the blade doesn't need a continuous application of the dry stick lube. I just push the tube (cardboard sleeve and all) into the running blade somewhere around once every minute or two of cutting depending on thickness of material.

    I've only used two thirds of a tube in 3 or 4 years. Mind you being retired I don't do an awful lot of cutting. I'm sure in a production environment the flood coolant system would be more efficient.

    I use the same lube stick on my power hacksaw and vertical cutting bandsaw. On my mag drill I usually use the on board coolant system but will sometimes use the dry stick if I don't want a mess.
    Last edited by Lis2323; 04-13-2018 at 11:27 AM.
    ​Terry

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  10. #160
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Just found out that a water quench is very good for hardening a chipping hammer. Or, good for the crappy chipping hammer I bought at Tractor Supply.

    However, it's not good for a tire iron.

    Both came out very very hard, harder even than the hammer I used to drive them. But the tire iron punch was exceptionally brittle and cracked on me.

  11. #161
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    not good for your chipping hammer either, you don't want it "chipping" itself, Wait till the missus goes out and stick it in the kitchen oven on high for an hour or so. Temper it down a bit.

  12. #162
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by jackdawg View Post
    not good for your chipping hammer either....
    No worries, the struck end has been drawn down a bit to soften it. The working end was left at full hardness, but it's meant to work on hot steel and will likely get the hardness drawn down very quickly, too.

  13. #163
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    I don't suppose 400 degrees in the oven would be enough to soften up my "square head" Hardy.
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  14. #164
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    I don't suppose 400 degrees in the oven would be enough to soften up my "square head" Hardy.
    Sure it will. Depends on what it's been tempered to from the beginning, though. At 400º, you might be softening it by tempering it down, but that's not very far from full hardness after a quench.




    Knives and such are often tempered somewhere between 420 and 460, depending on the alloy, and you can see how hard that leaves them. Your bolt might already be there. Honestly, I'd think it mighty odd to have such a hard bolt because that makes the bolt brittle and likely to snap rather than bend or stretch under load. Any failure would be sudden and catastrophic.

    Were it me, I'd take the torch to the head and temper it that way. Even a little hand torch with MAPP gas would have sufficient heat to get the head well beyond 400 in a few minutes. You could pre-heat it in the oven at 400, then use the propane or MAPP torch to get it up even hotter without worrying about running out of gas in those little bottles.

  15. #165
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Good idea... thanks.
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  16. #166
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    After the expensive apron adventure, I kinda had the bug to make my own apron.

    I was very happy with the Tillman apron that I had been using, and I modeled the fancy apron after it. If the old apron hadn't dried out and started tearing, I'd still be using it today!

    So, I picked up a new Tillman 48" apron and some dye from Hobby Lobby.



    Not the best dye job I've ever seen, but I bought a second bottle of dye to, hopefully, get the thing finished and darkened enough that stains don't show up so clearly. No idea why Tillman went with that bright orange color for an apron they know will be in a metal shop!

    The weirdest thing about the dye is that it seems to evaporate rather than actually stain the leather. When freshly applied and everything wet, the apron was pretty uniform in color. When it dried out, though, this is what was left. Some spots soaked all the way through the hide. Others didn't. Splotchy would be a good description.

    The second bottle of dye performed similarly, but I think I might have solved some of the issue by putting the apron into a trash bag overnight so there wasn't anywhere for the dye to evaporate to.

    Next on the list of things to do is rivet/glue some heavier leather to the areas were the straps join the body. This is where the last apron failed, so I'm thinking it'll be a good idea to reinforce things. How will I do that? No idea.

    As much as I sweat (ain't easy being a fat man in the south!), my old attempt at using roofing nails as washers didn't last very long. It worked, but rusted to pieces in a skinny minute.

    Copper would likely do well, and I've seen brass rivets that might even be better. I figured to use some kind of rubber cement to hold the leather pieces together, but then I wondered how the glue would tolerate a light oiling.

    It's been fun so far and I think it'll work out just fine in the long run. Just gotta get the rest of the pieces together and she'll be right as rain.

    The #1 tool in my shop!

  17. #167
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    What was your application method for the dye? I'm wondering if some areas were just wetter than others? Are the dark spots where it soaked through? Maybe a spray application would be more even? Maybe there was some settling within the bottles, or residues that weren't getting mixed back into solution when you shook it?
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  18. #168
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    Maybe a spray application would be more even?
    I did use a spray bottle. My technique might not have been awesome, but I promise the whole thing was coated and looked pretty uniformly coffee-colored.

    When it dried out, this is what was left.

    The instructions on the bottle didn't say anything about wetting down the leather beforehand or shaking the bottle to mix things up. Honestly, I don't have a clue why the dye didn't soak in, or stay soaked in.

    It does look better now that I've put on a second bottle of dye. One thing I've found since the spraying, is that some bottles of dye on the market are specifically labeled as being for "suede and rough-out" leather. The stuff from Hobby Lobby doesn't say that, and I have to wonder why they'd specifically label a dye as being for suede. Maybe I bought the wrong stuff? Maybe the texture on the suede stops dyes from penetrating?

    No clue! But you can be sure that the third bottle of dye that I purchase will be specifically for suede!!!

    Next up, I'm buying a grommet kit and some extra leather. That'll reinforce the side attachment points where the straps come in. Maybe I'll get some rivets, or maybe I'll stitch the leather patches on. Not sure about that, yet.

    Getting closer, though. Once I have the system down pat, I might make a few for sale if it looks like folks'd want one for themselves. That's down the road, though.

  19. #169
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Why does a fat sweaty man of the South care about fashion? Get er done!

  20. #170
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    LOL... oh Dude! That's just rude! The nationally apologetic Canadian in the crowd could never say things like that... well not unless it involved beer...
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  21. #171
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Shimanek View Post
    Why does a fat sweaty man of the South care about fashion?
    Gotta look good while I'm rocking it out!

  22. #172
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    I'm sure you'll all be happy to know the apron project is moving right along. The second coat of dye helped even things out, but I'll need a third bottle to really get things squared away. This time, though, I'll buy dye specifically branded as being for suede.

    Amazingly, the hardware stores have paid off more than Hobby Lobby ever did. Found the brass rings I needed at Tractor Supply, and just picked up a sweet grommet kit at Tru-Value. Who would have guess?!?!

    Now, though, I have to go back to HL to see about getting some leather for reinforcement patches as well as a bunch of rivets. Hate the notion, but there isn't much else in these parts. Might just get the leather and then hunt on eBay for the rivets. I think solid brass would go well with the brass grommets I just picked up......

    It's gonna be nice once all's said and done.

  23. #173
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    This is the piece of 8 inch diameter shaft made from 1045 steel that I picked up from WW member a2lute.

    It has a section that is approximately 8 inches in diameter and 45 inches long before it starts to taper and then is formed to about 6 inches in diameter.

    This stuff weighs 171 pounds per foot at 8 inches in diameter.

    My thought is to cut off a section about 9-12 inches long and turn it into a post anvil for myself until I can get a real/good quality anvil. That piece will weigh from 120 - 170 pounds. I have plenty of sections of trees, wood beams, or steel I can use to make a stand for that section.

    I was also thinking of trying to turn a few 2" tall pucks like VaughnT posted a while ago to help form some bowls.

    If I do that I will have several feet left that I can cut and then bring to ABANA this June to try to sell. I am hoping to offset the purchase price of this shaft plus get use the remaining money to offset the forge, tongs, hammers, etc.

    How long do you think I should cut the sections to try to sell, 6"??, 9"??, 12"??.

    How much do you think those size sections are worth or how much should I charge?

    How about the section that is already turned down? What should I do with that?

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    Last edited by psacustomcreations; 05-04-2018 at 12:10 PM.
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  24. #174
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by psacustomcreations View Post
    This is the piece of 8 inch diameter shaft made from 1045 steel that I picked up from WW member a2lute.

    It has a section that is approximately 8 inches in diameter and 45 inches long before it starts to taper and then is formed to about 6 inches in diameter.

    This stuff weighs 171 pounds per foot at 8 inches in diameter.

    My thought is to cut off a section about 9-12 inches long and turn it into a post anvil for myself until I can get a real/good quality anvil. That piece will weigh from 120 - 170 pounds. I have plenty of sections of trees, wood beams, or steel I can use to make a stand for that section.

    I was also thinking of trying to turn a few 2" tall pucks like VaughnT posted a while ago to help form some bowls.

    If I do that I will have several feet left that I can cut and then bring to ABANA this June to try to sell. I am hoping to offset the purchase price of this shaft plus get use the remaining money to offset the forge, tongs, hammers, etc.

    How long do you think I should cut the sections to try to sell, 6"??, 9"??, 12"??.

    How much do you think those size sections are worth or how much should I charge?

    How about the section that is already turned down? What should I do with that?
    That is one gorgeous hunk of metal!!

    Turning it into a post anvil all for yourself? I'd hesitate to cut a 12" section out of it just to mount said section onto a stump. Why add the stump to the equation? At 8" OD, that's already one great anvil even if it's not a "london pattern" anvil. You don't need an LP anvil to do 99% of what you might want to do in the blacksmithing world.

    Were it me, I'd figure out the height you like, and then cut the shaft so you have a solid line from your hammer to the ground. Mass under the hammer is what makes an anvil work great. With a 30" tall anvil that's one unbroken line to the earth, it'll work good and look awesome.

    To give you an idea....

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    I love this post anvil simply because it's got function and that timeless industrial beauty to it. Made from a breaker bit off some big ol' quarry machine, it's hellforstout. The guy then doubled-down on the awesomeness by welding it to a cool flange that raised it up to a good working height for him. I'd love to have something like that just because it looks so cool.

    The turned section.... I have no problem seeing that used "as is" for anyone wanting an anvil for bladesmithing. I love the look of that turned section and would gladly add it to my shop if I could. With those great lines, it's got a graceful look that's really nice, and just begs to be put on a nice bit of wood. It's a perfect anvil for most all blacksmithing, and certainly for someone making blades. Or Jewelers. Or Artists that occasionally need a place to bang metal around.

    Even without any mounting lugs, all you really have to do is lay down a bit of silicone caulk to hold everything in place. Really gorgeous chunk of metal you've got there! Cut it off where the taper starts, and ask $300 for it as a "bladesmith anvil ready for immediate use.

    Prices? That's a tough one. Finding a train axle like that, or whatever it might have come from, is very tough. Most people won't have access to that, but they can still buy similar chunks of steel for an anvil. Old World Anvils sells heat-treated 4x4x4 pieces of 4140 alloy as anvils. https://www.oldworldanvils.com/4-x-4-anvil

    Since yours will be larger, you should take that into account with the pricing. I'd rather buy from you, in person, than place some order online and then be surprised with what shows up in the mail.

    The downside to that is the pricing. Even though yours are more substantial, if you go over that $100 price point, folks will start hemming and hawing about the cost for "just a chunk of steel". I've seen more than a few folks balk at the price, hoping that they'll be able to score something similar for pennies at an auction or scrap yard. Generally, folks looking for that "starter" anvil are penny-pinchers.

    Making Steel Pucks of Awesomeness..... my dad will be flattered. I don't know that they need to be made from a tough alloy, but it certainly won't hurt to give it a go. If you have a way to make one with a true hemispherical depression.... well, I've been kinda keen on something about 6" across for making round dishes. 7" or 8" certainly wouldn't hurt to have, and would be a lot better than the silly cylinder bottoms I'm using now. Keep me in mind!!

    If you're thinking about selling them as just blank disks, that'd be problematic since folks can already buy disks of steel from various online sources. The cheap prices don't make it very good for someone like you wanting to sell off the extra bits you have since it's really not worth the time and trouble on your end.

    The Steel Pucks of Awesomeness haven't been great sellers on my end, but I also haven't been marketing them very much. If we had a bigger/better lathe and could make them faster....

    Blacksmiths and jewelers do like having swage blocks, though. If you have a way to make a good depression, you could likely find buyers that'll be willing to pay $80 for something that's 8" across and deep enough to swage a bowl. The problem is that there are already companies making genuine swage blocks out of cast ductile iron. They come with lots of shapes molded right into them, not just a single depression, and the price would make them competitive with what you might come up with.



    I like the Pieh Tool block because it has that big bowl depression on the one side and isn't so large that you have a problem moving it around. I haven't pulled the trigger on one, though, because I've been making do with my Steel Puck of Awesomeness and don't really do a lot that requires the other shapes.

  25. #175
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    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Vaughn,

    Thanks for the quick response.

    I have lurked on IFI for quite a while and saw that post anvil you posted in the Anvil Shaped Objects thread. Since I do not have any tools, equipment other than an old small RR track anvil, and haven't made anything to speak of, I have not posted at that site even though I am a member there.

    I was also wondering if it would be feasible/worthwhile to cut a 3-4" section and try to make a rotating swage block like whtbaron posted a bit ago. I was thinking of using a bunch of ball end mills (1/4"-1") I have and then cutting the grooves along the length. To cut larger radius grooves I was thinking of some of various larger end/face mills or boring heads I have. I might even try to do that to the side of the bowl puck.

    I am 5'8" tall so from what I can tell the top needs to be around 29.5" to 30" or so. That leaves me with plenty of stock to mess with. With that height in mind, I am now thinking that once I try to make a few pucks, swageblocks, etc, I may not have much left except the end that is cut down.

    DO you think it would be worth it to try to make a hardy hole in the top of the post?
    Last edited by psacustomcreations; 05-04-2018 at 02:29 PM.
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