Blacksmithing and forging - Page 16
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  1. #376
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    I was referring to the 2nd statue...
    Yea, that helps!

    For that candle holder, everything was held together with a 60-penny nail acting as the rivet. The large head of the nail was made somewhat larger by peening it on a bolster block until it filled the bottom of the candle cup. The underside was countersunk so the shaft of the nail could be peened flush.

    Nails make great rivets, but you've got to heat them up to anneal them since they're work-hardened from the factory.

  2. #377
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Interesting...that's one option I hadn't considered...
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
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    Les

  3. #378
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    A good morning's work.

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    Had to cut things short because I needed to get to the post office before they closed, but it was definitely a good day.

    And, since things are shut down for the time being, I took the liberty of ordering another Tillman apron through flea-bay.

    I know I talked up a great game about the custom apron I just had made for myself, but that apron is just too nice for daily use. I like it, but I'd rather save it for some day in the future when I go out in public to do a demonstration.

    So, I bought another Tillman apron and will be cutting, chopping and adapting it to make it better. The last apron I bought from them needed reworked right out of the gate, so this time I'll be prepared. The idea is to use three-bar sliders and some "extra" touches to make the apron a far far better thing. Maybe I'll even offer to make them a standard item that I turn out.

    This prototype will be fun to work with since I'm not much in to doing things with leather. But, I figure I can tweak it just enough to make it something financially viable for a lot of smiths, and infinitely better than the design that Tillman came up with on their own.

    I thought about buying some leather, but I can't buy a 2'x4' sheet of hide for $40 or less, so going with the pre-made apron seems like the most effective way. If it works out like I hope, I'll buy a second apron to adapt and sell......

  4. #379
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    You remind me of my Mother. She would get really nice things at Christmas and put them in her dresser drawers to "save" them. When she passed away, we found a department-store cache of stuff...all brand spanking new!!!

    Use the darned apron. A shiney new apron ain't gonna impress anyone.

  5. #380
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    I'm with Shortfuse - use the apron! Even my shiny new Lincoln black helmet is scratched now. Put on the apron and beat some metal!

  6. #381
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by Xsbank View Post
    I'm with Shortfuse - use the apron! Even my shiny new Lincoln black helmet is scratched now. Put on the apron and beat some metal!
    Quote Originally Posted by shortfuse View Post
    Use the darned apron. A shiney new apron ain't gonna impress anyone.
    Be at ease, gentleman. The apron has been used for the last week or so since I got it. Took me awhile to get used to it since it's so much heavier than my old apron..... and get over the notion of dirtying up a piece of gorgeous leather! It really is gorgeous leather!!!

    I've knocked the new off it, for sure. But as the weather warms up, a super-thick apron isn't the most comfortable thing to wear. If I keep wearing it, the oils and greases in the shop will certainly get on it, and that's not something that's very attractive when you have to do a public demonstration. You want the apron to look used, obviously, but still clean and classy to a certain degree. And I'm hoping it will just be a fun adventure. I don't generally work with leather unless I'm tanning a hide fresh off the deer, so this will make for a fun learning experience.

    How many disasters have I gone through because they sounded like a fun learning experience????

  7. #382
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Vaughn, we're jus' pullin' yer chain......

  8. #383
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by shortfuse View Post
    Vaughn, we're jus' pullin' yer chain......
    No worries, friend. I didn't take it any other way!

    I'll be sure to get my new/cheap apron plenty filthy and post lots of pictures!

  9. #384
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Wanna borrow my butchered leather jacket? .... it will keeeeeel......
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
    230 amp Sears AC Stick
    Lincoln 180C MIG
    Victor Medalist 350 O/A

    Les

  10. #385
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging


  11. #386
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    I was in Carcassonne in France last Spring and all the gang that keeps the castle alive, who restored the whole pile, the guys that roofed the buildings and the towers with slate, the carpenters, the stonemasons, the blacksmiths the lead-gutter-guys, the plumbers...etc. all put on displays of what they did during a weekend show and all of them were competent, fascinating to watch and scruffy as hell. Nobody freaked out because scruffy. You should have seen the team of blacksmiths building a couple of giant chandeliers out of wrought iron, sparks and hammers flying, there were 3 guys beating on the parts in perfect harmony all at once...amazing and unforgettable. Wear the apron with pride, its the work/art and magic that you produce that is fascinating, your state of dress is immaterial.

  12. #387
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by Xsbank View Post
    I was in Carcassonne in France last Spring and all the gang that keeps the castle alive, who restored the whole pile, the guys that roofed the buildings and the towers with slate, the carpenters, the stonemasons, the blacksmiths the lead-gutter-guys, the plumbers...etc. all put on displays of what they did during a weekend show and all of them were competent, fascinating to watch and scruffy as hell. Nobody freaked out because scruffy. You should have seen the team of blacksmiths building a couple of giant chandeliers out of wrought iron, sparks and hammers flying, there were 3 guys beating on the parts in perfect harmony all at once...amazing and unforgettable.
    I'd give my eye teeth to see something like that one of these days. Every time I watch a video of European smiths working on something today, it seems like they're all making elaborate high-level ironwork. Not only is it appreciated by the general public, but people are buying enough of it to support the trade!

  13. #388
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    It's a very different attitude in Europe. Around here it's hard to find a building that's more than 80 yrs old because they all get bulldozed for new crap with no character. I was surprised in England to find that even castles 100's of years old are constantly being renovated and restyled to meet current demands. Constantly retrofitting buildings made before modern building codes means reverting to practices of the past so there is more demand for the craft and more desire to maintain the look and style.
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
    230 amp Sears AC Stick
    Lincoln 180C MIG
    Victor Medalist 350 O/A

    Les

  14. #389
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Just finished up the "night shift" in the shop and am working on boxing up all the orders I managed to get forged.

    2 big nail hooks. 7 flat bar hooks. 1 carved anniversary dish. 1 shallow dish also for an anniversary, but not carved. 1 pendant.

    Not much, it seems, for a solid night's work, but carving that anniversary dish and texturing it and the shallow dish take ages! I really need to get me a power hammer to speed things up!

    Not the glamorous work I'd like to be forging. No giant grills and intricate lacing of hard steel.... but it's paying work and it's always an honor to have my work considered for someone's anniversary celebration.

    Now, I'm gonna drink a few more beers and drop the boxes off at the post office around the corner. Then it's nap time!

  15. #390
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    One pair down, another to go.



    Getting the layout and all that stuff took a gob of time, but now that this set is finished, I feel good about moving on to the next. The customer wanted something to support a table top between two cement columns. Because the site isn't very fancy, we opted for simple brackets that have an industrial feel to them. They'll go very nicely with the square columns and rectangular table.

    To give it a little visual interest, I opted for thick washers behind the bolt heads. This gives you some depth to the design and catches the eye. Anyone looking at these brackets will know they weren't bought at some hardware store!

  16. #391
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    very nice work.....just a question on how you uploaded pics to WW? as most are having issues with uploading pictures to the sight..

  17. #392
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by Hobbytime View Post
    very nice work.....just a question on how you uploaded pics to WW? as most are having issues with uploading pictures to the sight..
    Thank you.

    I've had a hard time uploading pics straight from my computer, so I will upload them to another site (bookface, tumblr, google+, etc) and then copy the image address at that site.

    If you try to upload a file straight from the computer, there's a HUGE delay and sometimes you can wait ten minutes only to find out that something went wrong and the upload failed.

  18. #393
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Got these brackets made up over the last few days in the shop.


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    I really enjoyed the process and watching them come alive. But I can see that I'll have to come up with a better way if I want to do these consistently and in different sizes.

    Right now, I'm using my bench vise to hold the steel so I can bend it at the jaw line. That works, but the 2"x1/4" bar puts some wear on the vise and there's no way for easy adjustment should I want different lengths on the legs. So..... now I get to brainstorm and find a solution I can afford!

  19. #394
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    I was watching Nate's older video on making drifts and it brought to mind an old cheat I came up with ages back.



    In the vid, Nate is upsetting the middle of the mild steel bar he's using to make the drifts. Upsetting, or thickening, the center of the bar is necessary because the hole you're making will contract as the steel returns to room temperature.

    Nate does a great job with his videos and he's right to show folks how to do it from scratch. However, cheating isn't such a bad thing, right?

    What I do, when I need a finished hole of known size, is run down to the Tractor Supply or other such store and buy me a big bolt that's 1/16" larger in diameter than the drift I want. So, for a 1/2" drift, I actually use the shank of a bolt that's 9/16". Then it's just a matter of drawing out the ends and no upsetting of the middle is needed.

    Plain bolts cost pennies, and you can get them in lengths that leave you plenty of meat in the shank for making a drift. Cut the threads and head off, forge out the little bit of bare shank..... boom, perfect drift.



    The nice thing about bolts is that they're a slightly harder grade of steel. I've been able to quench the bolt drifts in water without any problems, and the harder alloy means the thinner drifts don't bend so easily. Overall, it's definitely a win.

    So, do it the old way like Nate shows in his video just so you can learn the motions. Then run down to the hardware store and pick up a selection of bolts to make another set. Any excuse to forge something!!

  20. #395
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    The table is up and the brackets are looking really good. Gotta say, I'm mighty happy with how this project turned out!



  21. #396
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    The heat has been amazing lately, and not in a good way! Trying to get some forge work done has been a sweaty affair, to say the least.

    Still, customers hate waiting, so I had to do what I had to do. Got three 5.5" dishes hammered out and finished, as well as a ton of hooks.

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    The infected tick bite set me back several days and I got emails from customers who were a bit concerned about not getting their products in a timely fashion. Thankfully, no new orders have come in and I'm now all caught up. I hate that no new orders have come in, but I'm glad for a bit of breathing room.

    Now, I'm going to cut some steel and weld up the two levels for the tong/hammer cart I've been wanting to make. I still haven't settled on the casters, but I figure I can get the angle iron cut for the two levels the cart will have, then tack in the expanded metal. If nothing else, it'll give me an excuse to try figuring out how to weld with 6011 and 6013 rods that I have on hand. Haven't been able to get them run right since I bought them, but I'm betting that's more me than some faulty rods from the maker!

    The rim of the shelves will be from 1x1x1/8 angle iron, so using my trusty 1/8 7018 rods seems a bit overkill. Plus, I'd like to be able to weld the corners without burning through in the first second.


    I might cut the 2x2x1/4 angle iron I have for the legs, but I'm a bit worried that I'll cut them too short or too long because everything depends on the OAH of the casters.

    That's the frustrating part. There are a lot of casters out there, and I'd like to get something that's a bit industrial/vintage. I can buy new at TSC or the like, but they're so ugly.
    Last edited by VaughnT; 07-04-2018 at 06:15 PM.

  22. #397
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Vaughn,
    I assume you have looked on ebay for vintage metal casters?
    There are some reasonably priced ones that are bolt on and then others with a stem.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
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  23. #398
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by psacustomcreations View Post
    Vaughn,
    I assume you have looked on ebay for vintage metal casters?
    There are some reasonably priced ones that are bolt on and then others with a stem.
    Sure have. I have two different types currently on my watch list, but I'm having a bear of a time deciding what I like best. Old casters are easy to find, but old casters that look neat..... whole 'nuther beast.

    Kinda silly to want the casters to have a particular look, I know. That's one of the things that kept me from simply running down to the hardware store to pick some up.

    Stem-style, but those wheels are awfully bland. 5"x1-1/4", so they're plenty beefy and would get the job done. Are they too big? Too bland? They look like they're all plastic, so I wonder if they'd crack in a year's time.


    5"x1-3/8", and they look pretty neat. I even like the scratched up paint. Those little brass tags are cool, and not something I've seen before. They look good and I'm sure I could make some feet for the legs so these things can be bolted on rather than welded.



    Or, do I just bite the bullet and get solid cast-iron wheels? I've had bad luck with them in the past, with the things seizing up with rust or catching on the smallest crud on the floor. Wouldn't have to worry about the rubber dry rotting in a couple months, but will they roll smoothly if they sit in the shop a year between movings?

  24. #399
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    Quote Originally Posted by VaughnT View Post
    Sure have. I have two different types currently on my watch list, but I'm having a bear of a time deciding what I like best. Old casters are easy to find, but old casters that look neat..... whole 'nuther beast.

    Kinda silly to want the casters to have a particular look, I know. That's one of the things that kept me from simply running down to the hardware store to pick some up.

    Stem-style, but those wheels are awfully bland. 5"x1-1/4", so they're plenty beefy and would get the job done. Are they too big? Too bland? They look like they're all plastic, so I wonder if they'd crack in a year's time.

    5"x1-3/8", and they look pretty neat. I even like the scratched up paint. Those little brass tags are cool, and not something I've seen before. They look good and I'm sure I could make some feet for the legs so these things can be bolted on rather than welded.

    Or, do I just bite the bullet and get solid cast-iron wheels? I've had bad luck with them in the past, with the things seizing up with rust or catching on the smallest crud on the floor. Wouldn't have to worry about the rubber dry rotting in a couple months, but will they roll smoothly if they sit in the shop a year between movings?
    Since I am spending your money, I kind of like the look of these from Northern Tool.
    https://www.northerntool.com/shop/to...ct_40986_40986
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    Millermatic 252 MIG
    Miller Dynasty 200DX TIG
    Miller Spectrum 375 Plasma
    Altas 12x36 Metal Lathe
    Bridgeport Milling Machine
    www.psacustomcreations.com

  25. #400
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    Re: Blacksmithing and forging

    I just went out to the shop to take photos of what I had:





    Boring 4” cast iron swivel on my 4x8 welding table


    But never mind. The one Pat posted while I was typing IMO is ideal.
    ​Terry

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