Newbie having some trouble
RSS | Subscribe | Contact Us | Advertise | About Us
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1

    Newbie having some trouble

    Hey Guys,
    First time posting here and I could use a little help with troubleshooting. I'm trying to weld 1/8" flat bar and I'm getting a lot of spatter and an erratic arc. Been running it on 120 volt and it keeps popping the circuit breaker. I have a millermatic 211 with autoset, I'm using .030 wire and have my gas set to 20 cfh.
    Any help is appreciated!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Langley B.C.
    Posts
    14

    Re: Newbie having some trouble

    Are you sure the plug you are using can handle the amps drawn? Is the polarity in the machine set for gas? That could explain the arc. What are you settings on the machine?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    North of Philly
    Posts
    14,788

    Re: Newbie having some trouble

    To do 1/8" on 110v you will need a dedicated 20 amp breaker. That means a breaker with nothing else running on it thats rated for 20 amps minimum. You are pushing the bounds of what that machine will do on 110v especially if you are running 75/25 gas. It will want to draw as much power as possible to do that weld, so it wouldn't surprise me to see you trip a 20 amp breaker occasionally.

    I'm not that familiar with the auto set function. Looking at the manual, if you are setting up manually, you need to set the voltage higher on 110v input than you would for 220v use. With .030 wire and 75/25 it suggests 6/60 on 110v and 4.5/65 on 220v for 1/8". I believe the autoset will adjust for 110v/220v automatically, but it does have a preset list of perameters that it assumes for wire size and gas type I believe. If you are working outside those parameters the settings will be off.
    .



    No government ever voluntarily reduces itself in size. Government programs, once launched, never disappear. Actually, a government bureau is the nearest thing to eternal life we'll ever see on this earth!

    Ronald Reagan

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    57

    Re: Newbie having some trouble

    Welders requires a slow blow fuse and not a regular house current circuit breaker.

    You need to use a dedicated line, a dedicated 120 - 20 amp outlet and 90-10 gas.

    The welder you are using is not the proper welder to be using to weld metal - even that thick.
    What you really need to use is a 240 welder or a stick welder.

    Your welder was designed to weld sheet metal - light duty - such as in a small garage or body shop - occasionally - not every day or for prolonged periods of time.

    I imagine that your welder set on high probably has a 30% duty cycle 3 minutes weld and 7 minutes cool down and you are exceeding the weld time.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Langley B.C.
    Posts
    14

    Re: Newbie having some trouble

    I am pretty sure the miller 211 is rated for single pass on 3/8" on 220 volt. Can you not run it on a 220 circuit?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    652

    Re: Newbie having some trouble

    http://www.millerwelds.com/products/...c_211_autoset/

    The 211 can run both 120V and 220V according to the product page. From a lot of the other posts I've seen asking this same question the common troubleshoot was check to see that the polarity is set correctly.
    Lincoln AC225 and Cart
    Lincoln WeldPak HD and Cart
    One hand

  7. #7

    Re: Newbie having some trouble

    thanks for the feedback so far guys, i will have to check on these suggestions and look into the breaker issue and get back to you soon, in the mean time any other suggestions are welcome!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    San Dimas, CA
    Posts
    2,501

    Re: Newbie having some trouble

    Quote Originally Posted by Booger Welder View Post
    The welder you are using is not the proper welder to be using to weld metal - even that thick.
    What you really need to use is a 240 welder or a stick welder.

    Your welder was designed to weld sheet metal - light duty - such as in a small garage or body shop - occasionally - not every day or for prolonged periods of time.
    WTF are you talking about?
    Hold my beer...watch this.

  9. #9

    Re: Newbie having some trouble

    The best results as far as powering the machine will be 240v on a 60 amp line. We tapped a Miller Stick/Tig machine (I believe it was around a 200) directly into 120/20 breaker box and ran without interuption. The problem was you could not match amps to volts, basically you just cranked it all the way up and hoped for the best. The house service you are running on is not recommended. The spatter could be caused by several things, the wire should be free of any contaminants (even the ones you can't see), the gas flow can be increased 5-10cfh and 75/25 gas will work fine unless you just want to spend more money. With 1/8" flatbar I would run at 16-18 volts but matching the WFS (amps) will be difficult because of the 120/20 service. With 240 you should be able to run around 200 WFS with a longer stick out to soften the current and control the arc (maintaining a good travel speed at these settings will be crucial). Some of the spatter could be related to the eratic arc problem which is also a current issue. As I stated before, running on house service gives you no fine control over the current; the machine wants it all or nothing. If you are welding the flatbar on top of another piece of metal make sure their are no gaps, this will most definetely cause the current to go haywire. You can also clamp your ground directly to the piece and weld towards it or you can coil the ground wire around the workpiece to create a stable energy field. These are all pretty basic fixes, I think your major problem is the 120 service. Hope this helps. Good luck.

  10. #10

    Re: Newbie having some trouble

    Hi Newbie, This is what I would do. Get on a more powerful source of power, like a dryer plug. It sounds as if you don't have a strong enough flow to produce a good arc. Plug into the washer/dryer plug. Secondly, if you are welding in the flat position, put your pieces flat on the table and put your ground clamp to the side you will be welding toward. Third, your gas flow does not seem to be a problem as you did not mention pinholes in your weld. Leave it alone. Your angle to the work piece is very important.HJold gun staight up and down from the work piece. Then tilt the top of the gun 15 degrees away from your starting point. What that means is aim into the weld. You know how you hold a pencil slanted when you are writing? That is what I mean by a 15 degree tilt. Then tilt your gun very slightly towards the top of that weld. Just like a pencil toward paper. You are not welding right on top of the sheet of paper, your pencil is angled somewhat. Next, you might want to decrease you wire feed speed (WFS) to about 150-175 and your volts to about 18. Then adjust your stickout to about 1/2 inch. The stickout being longer decreases the volts and may allow you to control that spatter somewhat. You don't want your weld deposition rate to be high. You want the weld metal to lay somwhat flat but slightly rounded. You may be going too slow with too high a voltage. There are so many variables to deal with that it is hard to say one thing will correct your issue. Watch your angle, stay about 18 volts and increase your stickout. Weld towards your ground clamp and be consistent with your travel speed (the speed in which you move forward in your weld. When you get rid of the spatter, you more than likely are at the right voltage. Move your gun toward and away from your workpiece as you are welding to see where your arc corrects itself. The sound, which is very important, should sound like frying bacon. That constant sizzling sound. Sounds crazy but listen to your weld and make it sound consistent. If you are popping, cracking and sounding like rice crispies, change your angle or travel speed and see if that helps. I don't know if any of this will help but I hope that it does. Good luck to you.

  11. #11

    Re: Newbie having some trouble

    If you have problems handling the longer stick out then decrease the WFS towards 175 and stand up on the weld while decreasing the stick out. This will increase the force of the arc and is normally good for penetration and lower bead profile, it is also a good way to force the issue with the current.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Texas Near Dallas
    Posts
    988

    Re: Newbie having some trouble

    Being on 110v explains popping the breaker, but it doesn't totally explain the bad welding. On 110v you should be able to make a decent weld just with a smaller puddle, less penetration, and a smaller bead. Some pictures of your welds would help. Are you using flux core, or solid wire? If solid wire, is the gas turned on? (Yeah, I've made that mistake before). Someone else mentioned polarity. I can't remember which polarity is for which since I have a nice little cheat sheet inside the cover on my welder. Is the wire feeding smoothly? Do you have the wire speed set fast enough? Is your ground connected well?

    You could have erratic arc if the voltage on the 110v is varying much with current load. Since you're popping the breaker you're running at the top limit of that circuit. The 15A circuit might have 14ga wire and who knows how long the run is. I'd invest the time to get a proper 220v plug installed.

    Dynasty200DX w/coolmate1
    MM210
    MM Vintage
    Lincoln AC225
    Victor O/A, Smith AW1A
    Cutmaster 81
    IR 2475N7.5FP
    Rage3
    Jancy USA101
    9" SB
    AEAD-200LE

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
RSS | Home | Penton Media | Contact Us | Subscribe | For Advertisers | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement