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Thread: The daddywagon

  1. #101
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    76

    Re: The daddywagon

    The extensions overlapped the flow tubes that I cut off and I welded them on a portable miller table off of the car. I actually bought the dynasty a couple of years ago with every intention of learning the skill but never got around to it.

  2. #102
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
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    6,767

    Re: The daddywagon

    U will like it. It's nice and clean

  3. #103
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    Mar 2015
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    76

    Re: The daddywagon

    Quote Originally Posted by motolife313 View Post
    U will like it. It's nice and clean
    You mean the dynasty? I’m sure I will! That machine is way above me, and I went beyond by going liquid cooled with a wireless pedal. Time to practice and build subframe connectors! Haha!

  4. #104
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    Mar 2015
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    76

    Re: The daddywagon

    Cruisin’ Flowmasters! It has that old school v8 rumble!

  5. #105
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    Mar 2015
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    76

    Re: The daddywagon

    New decal!

  6. #106
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    Jan 2012
    Location
    West Rutland, Vermont
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    151

    Re: The daddywagon

    This is so cool!

  7. #107
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    Nov 2014
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    6,767

    Re: The daddywagon

    U take any ricers money yet?

  8. #108
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    Mar 2015
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    76

    Re: The daddywagon

    Quote Originally Posted by 6Boys View Post
    This is so cool!
    Thanks! Stay tuned for a 351w... hopefully!

    Quote Originally Posted by motolife313 View Post
    U take any ricers money yet?
    No. Not yet. The car sounds more powerful than it actually is. It’s more of a surprise to others and most just look and smile or give a thumbs up!

  9. #109
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    pittsburgh,pa.
    Posts
    106

    Re: The daddywagon

    NICE!You got room under that hood for a blower?
    either you LIKE BACON or you're WRONG!!!! "There are three kinds of men.The ones that learn by readin'.The few who learn by observation.The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves"-Will Rogers

  10. #110
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    76

    Re: The daddywagon

    Quote Originally Posted by bhound View Post
    NICE!You got room under that hood for a blower?
    Yes! Any mod you can do to the fox chassis mustang can be done to the Daddywagon! My intent is 351 windsor at this time. We shall see.

  11. #111
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Sechelt, BC
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    132

    Re: The daddywagon

    I had a 351 Windsor and it was a very thirsty, inefficient truck motor. Don’t you mean a 351 Cleveland? That was always the “hot” setup. Nowadays I would go after a 5.0 Coyote.

  12. #112
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    Mar 2015
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    76

    Re: The daddywagon

    Quote Originally Posted by Xsbank View Post
    I had a 351 Windsor and it was a very thirsty, inefficient truck motor. Don’t you mean a 351 Cleveland? That was always the “hot” setup. Nowadays I would go after a 5.0 Coyote.
    Yeah. A 351 windsor. The cleveland I believe is heavier. Coyote is not in the budget. I have a 351 sitting. There are some things to do with it yet but I think I am just gonna throw it in there next week and see what happens. What did you have the 351 installed in? Fuel efficiency be darned!

  13. #113
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    Mar 2005
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    Under a Rock
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    3,234

    Re: The daddywagon

    Quote Originally Posted by Xsbank View Post
    I had a 351 Windsor and it was a very thirsty, inefficient truck motor. Don’t you mean a 351 Cleveland? That was always the “hot” setup. Nowadays I would go after a 5.0 Coyote.
    cleveland/windsor different animals..

    351 windsor = 302 with a longer stroke. .... basically.
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  14. #114
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    Apr 2016
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    CA
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    3,628

    Re: The daddywagon

    Full size Bronco's come with 302 or 351. Is the 351 in those a big block cleveland
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  15. #115
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    Aug 2017
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    Sechelt, BC
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    132

    Re: The daddywagon

    The Windsor was in an F250 and did not have much power. People were installing a 460 instead and it gave gobs of power with the same fuel consumption.

    I think the Cleveland had a short stroke bigger bore but the Windsor had a long stroke. I also remember trying a timing gear with a mofified keyway which advanced the timing and gave you a bit better mileage.

    Im going to look this up, I would hate for you to go to all the trouble of an install only to be disappointed in the power.

  16. #116
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    Aug 2017
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    Sechelt, BC
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    132

    Re: The daddywagon

    Pinnacle of the 351 Cleveland engine design: the 1971 351 four-barrel H.O., better known in enthusiast circles as the Boss 351 engine. All the good stuff is here: four-bolt mains, giant ports and valves, high-compression combustion chambers, forged pistons, aluminum intake, and Ram Air.

    The 351 story begins with the 1969 351 Windsor, a tall-deck spinoff of the world-beating 289/302. It featured a half-inch longer stroke than the 302, and even in standard passenger car form (there was no performance version of the 351W) it equaled the Boss 302’s factory horsepower rating. This image is taken from the 1969 press event where the 351W engine was introduced. Can you spot the error?


    Mid-1970, the new 351 Cleveland replaced the 351 Windsor. The 351 Cleveland featured many advancements, especially in the cylinder heads, which were patterned after the 429. Ports were huge, with valves to match. The 351C block is easily distinguished by the cast-in timing gear cover that extends forward at the front of the engine.

    Expanding on the valvetrain geometry introduced on the 1968 429, the Cleveland’s improved breathing came from canted valves. Both intake and exhaust valves were tilted on two different planes, allowing large diameters, smoother port transitions, and greater flow of coolant between the valves.

    Connecting rods on 351C engines, both two- and four-barrel versions, were forged steel. Main bearing caps for both had extended width to allow for the possibility of four-bolt mains. Neither engine had four-bolt mains for 1970, but beginning in 1971 they would become standard on four-barrel 351C engines.

    Two versions of the 351C were built for 1970, a two-barrel engine and a four-barrel. On the 351C, the difference extended beyond the carb and intake manifold. Two-barrel 351s had heads with large ports and valves, while four-barrel 351s got very large ports and valves, and a 600-cfm Autolite 4300-A carburetor on an iron, dual-plane intake manifold. Cleveland heads have “2” or “4” cast into the corners to designate which head it is.

    Popup pistons and closed-chamber heads helped bump compression up to 11.0:1 for the 1970 351C four-barrel and 1971 351 H.O. (Boss 351). All 351 production heads were iron. No aluminum option was offered. The 2.19-inch intake valves were the largest in the industry for a midsized engine. For comparison, the 1970 1/2 Z28’s LT-1 engine used 2.02-inch intake valves.


    To better tolerate lower octane fuels, all 1972 and later 351Cs used the lower compression, open-chamber heads. Valve size remained the same for 1972, but changes were coming for 1973 and beyond.

    The 1971 and 1972 351 H.O. engines got many valvetrain upgrades, including: larger-diameter, threaded rocker studs; hardened pushrods; guide plates; hardened, single-groove valve keepers; higher-rate valve springs; steel spring base; and hotter, solid-lifter cam. These changes, teamed with the Cleveland’s ample ports and valves, really gave the Boss 351 a mean streak.

    Exhaust manifolds, long a bottleneck on Ford engines, were addressed on the 351C. These castings may not have flowed as well as the 427’s long-tube manifolds, but they were a big improvement over the 289 and 390 manifolds. Four-barrel 351 exhaust manifolds had larger ports and passages than the two-barrel castings, but both had 2.0-inch outlets. The exception were Boss 351 manifolds, which had larger 2.25-inch outlets.

    You can tell a 351 Cleveland engine at a glance by its rectangular valve covers. Like the 289/302 predecessors, 351 Windsor heads have a little angle at the front and rear of the valve covers. Ford invested more than $100 million to bring the 351C to the market, and while it added a bright spot to the automaker’s engine lineup early in the 1970s, it closed out the decade as an unimpressive, long-stroke 351M and 400 two-barrel“

    Come to think of it, I may have had a 400M, a total pos. That possibility means I am out to lunch with the W or C engines so with that revelation, I hope I haven’t wasted anyone’s time?
    Last edited by Xsbank; 11-16-2017 at 04:50 PM.

  17. #117
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    76

    Re: The daddywagon

    No. Not a waste of time at all! Good info! The future build for this car is 400m rods with 1.16 compression height pistons stuffed in a stock stroke 351w. The dreaded long rod debate!

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