Depression era cast iron sink repair - Page 2
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  1. #26
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    AC TIG cleaning of CI

    Quote Originally Posted by therrera View Post
    Hi Dave,

    I called the welding supply shop that gave me the sample rods and said they are silicone bronze. He didn't know if it was a TIG welding rod or not but based on your comments this is the correct rod to use for the repair on this cast iron sink.

    Right?

    Thanks,

    Tony
    Yes, silicon bronze is ONE of your choices!
    If you use this--do not try to puddle the CI--fire off on the rod, let it wet in.
    ...ummm...thinking... for seal tight welding on CI--SI Bronze can have
    problems-porosity, toe not wetting in good enough

    On CI prep--grind or carbide burr for bevels on the CI edges to be welded
    regardless of the method that's used.

    One thing that really helps---on CI--after bevel prepping, is to
    take TIG AC--low amp setting 5-10, just barely let the torch fire off to make a weak
    dancing arc. Play the arc over the bevel prepped areas---you're looking for
    cleaning action-ONLY. You don not want to see red heat. Littte bits of sh*t, will keep blowing off, keep moving torch around, not dwelling in any one area,
    then go back to it. Can assist with ss brush as well.
    This can do an impressive job of cleaning and de-gassing the CI surfaces,
    with minimum heat input-no oxidation. With decent CI--this cleaning may create a honeycombed appearing surface--looking silver to chrome. That's bare-naked, CI that's normally never seen.

    I've actually gotten crack bonding on really good CI--with out adding filler, just to see what would happen--filler was added.

    [Yes--this is a method, darn few have ever tried or heard of. Anyhow, it's the best, low heat input method of prep I've found prior to silicon bronze, steel or nickel filler welding. CI welding with filler is ALWAYS a 'buttering' type of weld,
    one's attempting to get some adhesive bonding to the CI substrate.
    I'm curious if Peter (Castweld) has ever played with the above. ]
    Last edited by dave powelson; 07-22-2011 at 05:18 PM. Reason: correction
    Blackbird

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  2. #27
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    Re: AC TIG cleaning of CI

    Quote Originally Posted by dave powelson View Post
    Yes, silicon bronze is ONE of your choices!
    If you use this--do not try to puddle the CI--fire off on the rod, let it wet in.
    ...ummm...thinking... for seal tight welding on CI--SI Bronze can have
    problems-porosity, toe not wetting in good enough

    On CI prep--grind or carbide burr for bevels on the CI edges to be welded
    regardless of the method that's used.

    One thing that really helps---on CI--after bevel prepping, is to
    take TIG AC--low amp setting 5-10, just barely let the torch fire off to make a weak
    dancing arc. Play the arc over the bevel prepped areas---you're looking for
    cleaning action-ONLY. You don not want to see red heat. Littte bits of sh*t, will keep blowing off, keep moving torch around, not dwelling in any one area,
    then go back to it. Can assist with ss brush as well.
    This can do an impressive job of cleaning and de-gassing the CI surfaces,
    with minimum heat input-no oxidation. With decent CI--this cleaning may create a honeycombed appearing surface--looking silver to chrome. That's bare-naked, CI that's normally never seen.

    I've actually gotten crack bonding on really good CI--with out adding filler, just to see what would happen--filler was added.

    [Yes--this is a method, darn few have ever tried or heard of. Anyhow, it's the best, low heat input method of prep I've found prior to silicon bronze, steel or nickel filler welding. CI welding with filler is ALWAYS a 'buttering' type of weld,
    one's attempting to get some adhesive bonding to the CI substrate.
    I'm curious if Peter (Castweld) has ever played with the above. ]
    Hey Dave
    I have Tigged together some cast iron stuff just froming a puddle and fusing together. This has worked on some antique thin sectioned items. Won't work on complicated section or hollow castings. I do not know grade of CI that I weld on most of the time and experiment alot. I find that if I light tig arc and the puddle is clean and shiny sometimes it can be fused w/o filler.
    If I light arc and a dull black hole forms with a small shiny ball dancing in the bottom I know that there is going to be problems! I think the volume of weldable metal in puddle is the small shiny ball, the black stuff is carbon, and the rest of the missing material is crap that vaporized from arc. Some fillers will wet out in the pit and allow a weld. Other times you can not get anything to stick, thats when I will resort to brazing, spray weld, or next if the part is expensive is to hot weld. (OA in oven with cast iron filler)
    Overall I find that nirod dc will weld more difficult iron castings than TIG. All processes have a place, the more tricks in your "bag" the more success you will have on CI.
    Peter
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  3. #28
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    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair

    Hi all,

    sorry I haven't reported back yet. I got hit with work and had to put the sink project on the back burner until tomorrow. I'll keep in mind what castweld said about the puddle and it's charactaristics before proceeding with it. If it is a clean puddle, then I can proceed as suggested. If its dirty, I may go with the ni rod stick.

    Thanks,

    Tony

  4. #29
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    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair--update

    Hello all,

    I finally got to working on the sink for about 1/2 hour this afternoon and will finish it tomorrow afternoon after I get back from some service calls.

    I ground the area around the break and put a slight bevel into it. It is all shiny metal right now. I ran the TIG arc over the whole break / bevel and sure enough I got a dull gray, almost fine sandblast look to the metal. This is the cleaning action that you referred to earlier.

    It did not pop nor release any black soot looking stuff with sight exception to a few tiny spots. Attached are some pictures and you'll notice that when I cranked up the TIG torch it began to puddle a nice shiny spot, several of them. I didn't continue to see if it would bead up, but I could see that it appears that it would have if I cranked up the heat more.

    According to the last few posts, this indicates that the cast iron is "clean" and of good quality. Am I right on this?

    My next step is to cut out of some pipe the piece that will be welding into place. I'll silicone bronze it to the sink casting. Once done I will then cut the flat piece on the top to match the drain hole and silicone bronze that into place too.

    I ran some test beads with the bronze TIG rod using the technique described in a posting before and it worked just fine. I heated the area on some 1/8" mild steel plate and put the bronze rod into the arc, dropping a bead and then melted, smoothed it into place. Then, I got the leading edge of the bead and made a puddle that I fed rod into and made a bead just like if I were brazing. It worked fine so I think this project will go smoothly. I had my machine set to 55 amps at full pedal and see that I need some more heat do spread the bronze out more, but it was a good test I think. We'll see how it goes on the cast iron.

    Also, you'll notice that the sink has a rusty patina to it? Last night it rained strong here in Phoenix and some spray got under my patio roof and onto the sink, leaving a rusty finish. How can I get it clean again without having to pass a wire brush to it? Will "Navy Jelly" do it?

    Thanks,

    Tony
    Attached Images Attached Images      

  5. #30
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    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair--update

    Quote Originally Posted by therrera View Post
    Hello all,

    I finally got to working on the sink for about 1/2 hour this afternoon and will finish it tomorrow afternoon after I get back from some service calls.

    I ground the area around the break and put a slight bevel into it. It is all shiny metal right now. I ran the TIG arc over the whole break / bevel and sure enough I got a dull gray, almost fine sandblast look to the metal. This is the cleaning action that you referred to earlier.

    It did not pop nor release any black soot looking stuff with sight exception to a few tiny spots. Attached are some pictures and you'll notice that when I cranked up the TIG torch it began to puddle a nice shiny spot, several of them. I didn't continue to see if it would bead up, but I could see that it appears that it would have if I cranked up the heat more.

    According to the last few posts, this indicates that the cast iron is "clean" and of good quality. Am I right on this?


    My next step is to cut out of some pipe the piece that will be welding into place. I'll silicone bronze it to the sink casting. Once done I will then cut the flat piece on the top to match the drain hole and silicone bronze that into place too.

    I ran some test beads with the bronze TIG rod using the technique described in a posting before and it worked just fine. I heated the area on some 1/8" mild steel plate and put the bronze rod into the arc, dropping a bead and then melted, smoothed it into place. Then, I got the leading edge of the bead and made a puddle that I fed rod into and made a bead just like if I were brazing. It worked fine so I think this project will go smoothly. I had my machine set to 55 amps at full pedal and see that I need some more heat do spread the bronze out more, but it was a good test I think. We'll see how it goes on the cast iron.

    Also, you'll notice that the sink has a rusty patina to it? Last night it rained strong here in Phoenix and some spray got under my patio roof and onto the sink, leaving a rusty finish. How can I get it clean again without having to pass a wire brush to it? Will "Navy Jelly" do it?

    Thanks,

    Tony


    According to the last few posts, this indicates that the cast iron is "clean" and of good quality. Am I right on this?
    .....yes

    Tony, suggest you tack the steel pipe up in a bunch of places with the si-brnze-prior to running beads.

    Now comes the ticklish part:
    As mentioned prior-this casting is restrained-uneven heat input to it
    results in uneven expansion/contraction, which can cause cracking during
    heating and cooling cycles of the welding.

    What I do--without hesitation-on stuff like this--is remove the excess heat
    of welding, after some welding--by wet wiping towel/sponge or often water
    spray bottle--immediately after welding, in seconds. This removes the heat
    with it's expansion then contraction. Air blow off dry...then weld some more,
    not letting the casting area get more than 'very hot' to the touch...about 200˚F.

    I understand this is exactly wrong-per the 'experts'. However, this part cannot be furnace heated, maintained, then slow cooled.
    FWIW...on dozens of repairs from CI water jackets on engine blocks, forklift bellhousings, and various 'restrained' castings---removing the excess heat immediately--causes far less to no cracking problems than letting the heat cycling just have its way with the poor casting.

    Aggressive peening is an attempt to relieve the heating and cooling contraction stresses---caused by the heat soak of the weld.
    Immediate weld area cooling removes the problem-itself.

    [I'll probably get flamed into the alternate universe for this post!]
    Blackbird

    Fat Bastard for President-2016

  6. #31
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    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair--update

    Quote Originally Posted by dave powelson View Post

    According to the last few posts, this indicates that the cast iron is "clean" and of good quality. Am I right on this?
    .....yes


    [I'll probably get flamed into the alternate universe for this post!]
    I'm not sure why? Many will say either work cold or work hot, I suspect cold means cold and when I have worked cold with nickel that means "to me", hold the thumb down close by and keep it there before going on.

    I've never sprayed water but I have used air and just pink pink pink lightly with a small blunt chisel (I suppose this is more having something to do with myself than anything real).

    Cast is kinda clumsy in my mind, it can sit there and do nothing for a long time and then just decide to grow... It is also quite strong when hot, often when I boreweld ductile then stuff it in the furnace after grinding the weld flush it upsets the filler inside and the ends of the weld pooch out just enough to feel when cool.

    Matt

  7. #32
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    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair

    Hello all,

    Well I advanced a little more today. After preparing the broken out area for welding I cut a cardboard template of the patch to be welded and transferred it to a 3" steel pipe. I cut out the patch and checked it for fit up. After about three or four trims to get it somewhat close to the actual broken area I prepared it for welding too. I ground around the weld zone both inside and outside to shiny metal and put a slight bevel on the patch.

    Attached are a few shots of it. There are gaps in a few areas, but I can live with them and will fill them up with the bronze.

    I am thinking of "tinning" the edges of both the patch and the broken cast iron. My logic is that this way I have bronze in place on both parts and it should be relatively easy to join them by fusing to the tinned areas.

    Any thoughts on this? I will start again tomorrow with the welding using the technique laid out by Dave. I have NEVER squirted water or mist on a welded area to cool it down. I have however dunked parts in water leaving the area to be welded out of the water as a way to control heat.

    Once I have the patch welded in place, I will cut it to within 1/8" of the flat part of the casting where the drain comes out of. I will cut a piece out of 1/8" plate to match the missing area and cut the radius it needs to match the diameter of the casting and drain opening. There is a crack on this piece and I will bronze it shut. That's the plan!

    I like the approach, we'll see how it goes.

    Thanks,

    Tony
    Attached Images Attached Images      

  8. #33
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    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair--final report

    Hi all,

    well, here's the finished product. Took me twice the time I thought it would take as I underestimated the time involved in making the missing parts and fitting them just right. Also I didn't allow for murphy's law. Just as I had finished sealing up the side wall, I heard the dreaded "crack" and I saw a hairline crack running through the an edge of the weld on the right vertical side and extending slightly into the casting.

    My heart sank but I got right to fixing it. The cooling system worked so good that I got over confident and started running longer beads or lingering longer when I had fusion problems. I immediately went back to how I started in the beginning of just running about five or so seconds of weld puddle and then stopping in a disciplined manner. No matter what, I would stop after 5 or 6 seconds and start cooling off immediately after breaking the arc as Dave instructed. I also used wet towels wrapped around the area I was working.

    I didn't spray on the weld itself but the casting around it and into the heat zone. By welding such short beads I didn't get the casting real hot and it cooled down relatively quickly. After the water had stopped sizzling and just let off slight steam I wet the entire area I was welding, bead and all. Then I blew it dry, touched it to make sure it was just warm to the hand and started over again usually at another part of the casting. This way I jumped around closing the joint slowly but surely.

    Attached are pictures of the progression of the final stages of the repair. I made a template for the top piece out of light cardboard and transferred it to a 1/4" plate. I cut it with a torch and ground it down to final size.

    I used a MIG to tack and weld it into place using a set of magnetic holders to keep it on the same plane as the existing casting. This way the drain pipe should mount and line up perfectly and seal tight.

    I finished using the silicone bronze to seal up the top piece and joining to the the casting. I also sealed another crack that was already present. Then I ground it all flush to blend in the weld metal with the casting all over.

    Finally I used a rotary file (carbide burr) to cut the hole to size as it required final fitting after flame cutting it. I used a 2 1/8" hole saw as my guide as that is the size of the drain pipe opening. Came out a little rough, but workable.

    I want to thank all of you for your help and especially Dave for sharing his technique and I can see how it will radically change the way I approach cast iron repairs. I would think this approach will work regardless of filler metal used. It would work with stick and tig processes, no?

    I took a lot of pictures of the process because I though it would be of use for other welders who find themselves with projects like this one and are not quite sure how to go about it. This was one approach and it seemed to have worked well.

    I'll post more pictures in a few minutes as there is a five picture limit.

    Thanks,

    Tony
    Attached Images Attached Images      

  9. #34
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    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair--final report

    Quote Originally Posted by therrera View Post
    Hi all,

    well, here's the finished product. Took me twice the time I thought it would take as I underestimated the time involved in making the missing parts and fitting them just right. Also I didn't allow for murphy's law. Just as I had finished sealing up the side wall, I heard the dreaded "crack" and I saw a hairline crack running through the an edge of the weld on the right vertical side and extending slightly into the casting.

    My heart sank but I got right to fixing it. The cooling system worked so good that I got over confident and started running longer beads or lingering longer when I had fusion problems. I immediately went back to how I started in the beginning of just running about five or so seconds of weld puddle and then stopping in a disciplined manner. No matter what, I would stop after 5 or 6 seconds and start cooling off immediately after breaking the arc as Dave instructed. I also used wet towels wrapped around the area I was working.

    I didn't spray on the weld itself but the casting around it and into the heat zone. By welding such short beads I didn't get the casting real hot and it cooled down relatively quickly. After the water had stopped sizzling and just let off slight steam I wet the entire area I was welding, bead and all. Then I blew it dry, touched it to make sure it was just warm to the hand and started over again usually at another part of the casting. This way I jumped around closing the joint slowly but surely.

    Attached are pictures of the progression of the final stages of the repair. I made a template for the top piece out of light cardboard and transferred it to a 1/4" plate. I cut it with a torch and ground it down to final size.

    I used a MIG to tack and weld it into place using a set of magnetic holders to keep it on the same plane as the existing casting. This way the drain pipe should mount and line up perfectly and seal tight.

    I finished using the silicone bronze to seal up the top piece and joining to the the casting. I also sealed another crack that was already present. Then I ground it all flush to blend in the weld metal with the casting all over.

    Finally I used a rotary file (carbide burr) to cut the hole to size as it required final fitting after flame cutting it. I used a 2 1/8" hole saw as my guide as that is the size of the drain pipe opening. Came out a little rough, but workable.

    I want to thank all of you for your help and especially Dave for sharing his technique and I can see how it will radically change the way I approach cast iron repairs. I would think this approach will work regardless of filler metal used. It would work with stick and tig processes, no?

    I took a lot of pictures of the process because I though it would be of use for other welders who find themselves with projects like this one and are not quite sure how to go about it. This was one approach and it seemed to have worked well.

    I'll post more pictures in a few minutes as there is a five picture limit.

    Thanks,

    Tony
    .......!!!...getting in a hurry with the CI cold welding--just invites crack city! I think that's all part of the learning curve. At the best, what you're working with, is a very ticklish job, Tony. I'm impressed with your seeing this through.

    Tony asks: ' I would think this approach will work regardless of filler metal used. It would work with stick and tig processes, no?'

    Dave sez; yes--using the TIG AC on 5-10 amps to de-gas, clean up CI prior to stick, TIG, MIG, braze, etc.---is best cleaning method I've found.
    One still has to prep- solvent clean, carbide burr, grind, etc.---but this gentle etching--makes for good CI bonding.
    It performs degassing of the exposed CI break--which is one on the big benefits of preheating CI in gas furnace for brazing/welding.
    It also cleans things (I think) down close to a molecular level...when you can see those tiny 'chrome plated' balls and webs of pure CI...one's seeing something normally never seen.

    Thank Peter and Matt-for their input to this-as well.

    If--if one can get acceptable wetting and bonding with MIG--that can be the lowest heat input
    to the CI and can be done in this 'cold' welding mode, as well. Denny (Yorkiepap) has used cold MIG welding on CI....and Matt....and I'd suspect-Peter, too.
    Some major weld wire/rod mfg's. also recco very low, maximum inter-pass temp's. on CI repairs...so this biz isn't totally off the wall!
    Blackbird

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  10. #35
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    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair

    Here are a few more pictures of the progression of this repair. They show :

    1-the cutting of the template from cardboard.
    2-the piece cut from plate, fitted in place with a slight bevel on the pipe.
    3-the welded out piece.

    I ground all the welds flush and smoothed them out with a flapper disc for appearances and finish.

    I'll post the last pictures next.

    Tony
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  11. #36
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    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair

    Hi all,

    Here are the last shots. The show various angles of the repaired casting.

    Thanks all for you help. I'm going to post one last set of shots. The before and after pictures.

    I can see that the repair did not quite provide enough sealing area for the rubber drain gasket. I am going to suggest that they use silicone along with the rubber gasket. Also there may be an unseen crack or other cracks that were not detected as the object of my work was getting the drain to work.

    I proposed to my client that they use silicone liberally if they spot leaks here and there. They need to fill the sink with water after temporarily sealing the drain off to see if they detect any leaks that need to be sealed prior to putting the sink into use.

    Tony
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  12. #37
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    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair-before and after shots

    Hi again,

    This will be my last post with pictures on this thread as I feel I was able to pull off the repair successfully with the help and suggestions that was provided here. I am eternally grateful as your input helped me broaden my scope and ability so that I feel more confident when presented with jobs involving cast iron that I have not done before. As a result I am a better welder. Shown attached are the before and after pictures.

    I followed the technique for using the silicone bronze as instructed by castweld. It worked just as he described. I ran into the problem of the toe not fusing well as Dave wrote about and that's when I lingered longer with the torch to try and get fusion which led to the crack I wrote about. I used the wet towel as suggested by jakeru and will use them from now on when I do cast iron jobs. I used Matt's suggestion to "butter" (or tin) the steel patch with the silicone bronze. It made it much easier to tack and weld it out. I put a lot of tacks all around the patch as suggested by Dave. This helped me when I started to weld it out as the tacks gave me points of fusion that I could extend as I closed the joint little by little.

    Thanks again to all,

    Tony
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    Last edited by therrera; 07-28-2011 at 03:53 AM. Reason: To add more information.

  13. #38
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    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair

    Quote Originally Posted by therrera View Post
    Hi all,

    I proposed to my client that they use silicone liberally if they spot leaks here and there. They need to fill the sink with water after temporarily sealing the drain off to see if they detect any leaks that need to be sealed prior to putting the sink into use.

    Tony
    The part should stay in place well enough, unless somebody drops it hard.

    I'd dig up some 2 part automotive paint or flexible epoxy and coat the repair inside and out before placing in service. You can get an "after lock sealer" from Loctite but I'm not sure it would bridge a small void if it opened later from movement.

    You put a lot of work in that Tony, it's hard to recover the time needed but learning is worth something. The trouble with castings is it seems as if no two are the same (a bit like chidren) and something needs to be learned each time.

    Matt

  14. #39
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    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair

    Nice job!

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    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair

    Looks like it worked for you. No pics of inside? How did the ceramic coating inside do?
    Peter
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  16. #41
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    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair

    Thanks for posting the follow-up Tony. Glad to hear you got the job completed.

  17. #42
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    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair

    Hi castweld,

    I am going to clean it up today before turning it over to the client. I will take some pictures of the ceramic side of things. I need to figure out if there is someway I can clean the rust patina that developed when the rain hit the sink and turned it all orange/brown inside.

    Besides trying to get in every nook with a wire wheel or brush, is there some chemical I can spray on and hose off that would restore it to how it looked when it was brought to me just sandblasted?

    Any help is appreciated,

    Thanks,

    Tony

  18. #43
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    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair

    Quote Originally Posted by therrera View Post
    Hello all,

    well, I definitely feel like a ping pong ball here. It seems that it is about a 50-50 toss up between brazing it and using ni rod. The third option is to TIG it with bronze or ni rod. Tomorrow I will go out and practice a few beads with both to see how they flow.
    One thing you might do is go to a second hand store or construction junkyard and find
    some inexpensive cast iron ceramic coated sinks to experiment with. See for yourself just what ceramic coatings on cast iron do when you use welding processes. Weld on 'em and see if they crack. Then you'll know what to expect on the antique sink you're about to weld on.

  19. #44
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    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair

    Quote Originally Posted by therrera View Post
    Hi castweld,

    I am going to clean it up today before turning it over to the client. I will take some pictures of the ceramic side of things. I need to figure out if there is someway I can clean the rust patina that developed when the rain hit the sink and turned it all orange/brown inside.

    Besides trying to get in every nook with a wire wheel or brush, is there some chemical I can spray on and hose off that would restore it to how it looked when it was brought to me just sandblasted?

    Any help is appreciated,

    Thanks,

    Tony
    ...ummm..and I DIDN'T tell u this...dab it with brush and muratic acid--have
    rinse hose ready, and baking soda. This possibly can screw with the porcelain.
    Blackbird

    Fat Bastard for President-2016

  20. #45
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    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair

    That turned out looking really good. I hate to put it this way but better than I expected. There really is some talented guys here and now we all have this reservoir to refer to if we ever need it. Thanks.
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  21. #46
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    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair

    i have a question?


    does it hold water?

  22. #47
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    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair

    Nice fix Therrera, thanks for posting it.

    I wonder if just the chunk of the sink displaying casting date would be worth more than the whole thing as a functional sink? Or is that a pattern date?

    Anyway, Halloween, and ‘29 that's when things really started down the drain.
    I just think it'd be a great display somewhere... but I don't know where, so it's just as well that you fixed it to use as a sink.

    Nice job

    Good Luck

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    Sep 2008
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    748

    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair

    Quote Originally Posted by therrera View Post
    Hi castweld,

    I am going to clean it up today before turning it over to the client. I will take some pictures of the ceramic side of things. I need to figure out if there is someway I can clean the rust patina that developed when the rain hit the sink and turned it all orange/brown inside.

    Besides trying to get in every nook with a wire wheel or brush, is there some chemical I can spray on and hose off that would restore it to how it looked when it was brought to me just sandblasted?

    Any help is appreciated,

    Thanks,

    Tony
    Ospho or Chemprime, mild acid that converts rust. It is used on metal before primer, prime then paint.
    Peter
    Equipment:
    2 old paws
    2 eyes (that don't look so good)
    1 bad back

  24. #49
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Phoenix
    Posts
    740

    Re: Depression era cast iron sink repair

    Hello all,

    Thanks for the compliments. I don't know if it will hold water. I repaired a few cracks that were outside the break which I was asked to fix as a matter of principle. There may be some hairline cracks present that will leak, but I didn't see any. That's why I 'm suggesting that the owner of the sink coat it with some type of sealant.

    Matter of fact I just ordered some stuff from an infomercial that is a rubber paint in a spray can. It is being promoted to spray on where ever there is a leak of some type be it a roof, gutter, etc. (hey, a sink). I ordered it to stop some drips in our roof from around one of the air conditioner vent from the roof.

    Attached are the last shots for those who are interested in seeing the porcelain side of the sink. It's not a pretty sink, yet. They plan on having it resurfaced so it should look like new soon enough.

    Oh, I almost forgot. I just got some navy jelly and brushed it on and hosed it off. It took off the rust patina sure enough, but then dried to a white powdery look so instead of rust I now had a baking soda coat to it. Out of desperation I sprayed some wd40 on it and wiped it down. That brought back its black finish. Whew!!!

    Thanks again,

    Tony
    Attached Images Attached Images   
    Last edited by therrera; 07-30-2011 at 11:39 PM. Reason: To add some more detail.

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