Welding zinc coated chain - Page 2
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  1. #26
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    Re: Welding zinc coated chain

    If you want to remove the coating, try soaking in white vinegar a couple of days. This might remove the heavy stuff and still have some coating on it.

    As for your arch project, I saw a arch like that setting in ground and there were rods going vertical for bottles to set on. It was like those bottle tree projects , looked neat.

  2. #27
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    Re: Welding zinc coated chain

    Quote Originally Posted by psacustomcreations View Post
    HT2,
    Another option for your art projects is to stand up a section of pipe and then wrap the chain around it. If you tack a link at the top you can then adjust the amount of spiral that looks good. With some of the bigger material you seem to have either at home or at work, you may be able to find something with a diameter that can be used.
    psa,

    That sounds like a pretty easy doable idea that would yield some thing with good style points. What I'm seeing is using a pipe 16 to 18 inches in diameter about 6' tall that you could use as a form to get a nice spiral wrapped around. And having the last few links at the top turned in toward the middle so that the cylinder bell would hang right down thru the center of the spiral.

  3. #28
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    Re: Welding zinc coated chain

    I used cheap plated chain from Harbor Freight for this one and welded with MIG. Biggest issue was the little bubble towers that form from the molten plating. Zinc residue washed right off with the pressure washer prior to painting.

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  4. #29
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    Re: Welding zinc coated chain

    This is how I kept the links straight.

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  5. #30
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    Re: Welding zinc coated chain

    Forgot to add that my search for non-plated chain showed it was more expensive than plated.
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  6. #31
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    Re: Welding zinc coated chain

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  7. #32
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    Mar 2014
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    Re: Welding zinc coated chain

    duaneb55,

    I'd have to say your mig welding on the chain came out nicer than I would expected it to considering you welded over the plating. I also like that simple fixturing idea you've got for putting a straight section together. I'll be filing that idea away for possible future use.

    I used TIG to weld this plated chain to these horse shoes. Between the heavy mill scale on the shoes and the plating on the chain the condition of my tungsten deteriorated pretty rapidly. I ended up making the occasional on purpose "cleaning dip" to keep the worst of the contamination wicked off the end so I had at least some control of where the arc was going. Oh man it was ugly.

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  8. #33
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    Re: Welding zinc coated chain

    When it comes to getting plating (galvanizing) off of stuff there's a number of things you can use. I think it mostly depends on how much of it you've got to do.

    From a purely economical stand point I think Muriatic is probably your best bet. I found it locally for $6.50 / gallon. 16 oz. of it in 5 gallons of water does a pretty good job. 32 oz. / 5 gallon of water really gets things to bubbling. It is how ever a project best done out doors with a little bit of breeze blowing so you can stay on the upwind side of things. Wearing a face shield and rubber gloves and having a garden hose handy (in case you get some splashed on you) is also not a bad idea.

    As far as safe disposal goes just be sure and have enough material on hand that you can keep throwing stuff in it until it's no longer reactive. I dumped several batches of used up solution out on some weeds in the gravel kind of hoping it would kill them and got just the opposite result. If I do any of it again this Summer I'm going to experiment with watering a couple of my garden plants with it.

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  9. #34
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    Re: Welding zinc coated chain

    Quote Originally Posted by HT2-4956 View Post
    duaneb55,

    I'd have to say your mig welding on the chain came out nicer than I would expected it to considering you welded over the plating.
    Big difference in different coatings. Electroplated like what you have on every bolt for indoor use is thin (usually shiny), while hot dip galvanized is really thick (gray appearance). Probably a 10 times difference in the amount of zinc applied.

    You can mig weld over electroplated without to much of a problem but mig doesn't work too well for hot-dip galvanized.

    Best method I found for welding hot-dip galvanized is actually flux core. I've only tried gas-shielded flux core. It works really well - actually better than stick welding.

  10. #35
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    Jan 2016
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    Re: Welding zinc coated chain

    Quote Originally Posted by BD1 View Post
    If you want to remove the coating, try soaking in white vinegar a couple of days. This might remove the heavy stuff and still have some coating on it.
    I too would urge you to try the vinegar.

    I used it to remove the galv. from some emt electrical conduit. It worked great! The muriatic acid works faster, but less hassle with the vinegar.


    I sure value the discussions here, cause I learn all sorts of "tricks" for fabrication. Like Bistineau: stretch the chain on the od not the id. I guess being part of the "collective" makes me smarter, or at least more clever.

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  11. #36
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    Re: Welding zinc coated chain

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete.S. View Post
    Big difference in different coatings. Electroplated like what you have on every bolt for indoor use is thin (usually shiny), while hot dip galvanized is really thick (gray appearance). Probably a 10 times difference in the amount of zinc applied.

    You can mig weld over electroplated without to much of a problem but mig doesn't work too well for hot-dip galvanized.

    Best method I found for welding hot-dip galvanized is actually flux core. I've only tried gas-shielded flux core. It works really well - actually better than stick welding.
    Petey,

    I ran quite a bit of that heavy hot dipped galvanized stuff thru the acid this past summer. You're right about there being a big difference between that and this new thin shinny electroplating most stuff seems to come with these days. You put a bunch of heavy hot dip galvanized stuff in Muriatic and you get a pretty vigorous reaction going real quick.

    I went thru two gallons of Muriatic over a several week period last Summer pretty much just playing Mad Scientist seeing what it would or would not do for me. The two things I found it does well is get rid of hot dip galvanizing and cleaning up heavily corroded / rusted steel (old horse shoes, rail road spikes, chain, etc.). The two things I was disapointed at finding out it didn't do much for was getting paint off or removing fresh tightly bonded mill scale. I was going to experiment with Phospohric Acid but couldn't find a cheap local source of it. I found it on the Interweb but with the extra shipping charges for it being a hazardous substance it would have cost almost $60 / gallon.

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  12. #37
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    Re: Welding zinc coated chain

    Lysol brand toilet bowl cleaner is also 9.5% Hydrochloric Acid according to the label. I experimented with it to see what it would do for cleaning up coins. It wouldn't do a dam thing for Nickels. Either cleaning up dirty ones or removing the heat tint colors that welding left on them (which was what I was really hoping for).

    Dimes and Quarters on the other hand it had some effect on. Especially the exposed edge of the copper core in them. Problem was that the Copper went into solution and after a while started getting redeposited on the face of the coins which was not the result I was looking for.

    One additional experiment I thought of (but haven't actually made yet) would be to throw a bunch of sacrificial pennies in a solution of it and let them dissolve away until it became super saturated with copper. And then stick some thing else in it (like a piece of carbon or stainless steel) and see if it would copper plate it. That might could be a cool finish for a piece of desk bling.

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  13. #38
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    Re: Welding zinc coated chain

    Quote Originally Posted by HT2-4956 View Post
    Petey,

    I ran quite a bit of that heavy hot dipped galvanized stuff thru the acid this past summer. You're right about there being a big difference between that and this new thin shinny electroplating most stuff seems to come with these days. You put a bunch of heavy hot dip galvanized stuff in Muriatic and you get a pretty vigorous reaction going real quick.

    I went thru two gallons of Muriatic over a several week period last Summer pretty much just playing Mad Scientist seeing what it would or would not do for me. The two things I found it does well is get rid of hot dip galvanizing and cleaning up heavily corroded / rusted steel (old horse shoes, rail road spikes, chain, etc.). The two things I was disapointed at finding out it didn't do much for was getting paint off or removing fresh tightly bonded mill scale. I was going to experiment with Phospohric Acid but couldn't find a cheap local source of it. I found it on the Interweb but with the extra shipping charges for it being a hazardous substance it would have cost almost $60 / gallon.
    Nice! Hey, you probably wanna try sodium hydroxide, aka lye/caustic soda for paint removal. It's a strong base, very caustic. Sounds like it's right up your alley!

  14. #39
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    Re: Welding zinc coated chain

    Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) is pretty rough on conventional paint. Also will really eat up Aluminum and baked on grease. Heat up the powdered NaOH in a glass vessel and it will dissolve the glass. It will also permanently blind you quickly if you get any in your eyes.

    Try lemon juice or citric acid for cleaning up the coins. It also does a pretty good job on rusty steel. Also useful for tarnished brass - reloaders use it when tumbling.
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  15. #40
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    Re: Welding zinc coated chain

    Petey,

    All right I've got that on my list of things to try once it warms back up. As luck would have it I found an un opened can of Lycon's Red Seal Lye (The Farmer's Friend) last summer while rooting around in an old barn. The label says it's 97% sodium hydroxide. The label was a pretty interesting read and while it didn't say anything specifically about using it for paint removal it did give directions for how to use it to clean your Cuspidor and sweeten your Hog swill. No date on it I could find but I'd guess it's from some where in the early 1900s.

  16. #41
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    Re: Welding zinc coated chain

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldendum View Post
    Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) is pretty rough on conventional paint. Also will really eat up Aluminum and baked on grease. Heat up the powdered NaOH in a glass vessel and it will dissolve the glass. It will also permanently blind you quickly if you get any in your eyes.

    Try lemon juice or citric acid for cleaning up the coins. It also does a pretty good job on rusty steel. Also useful for tarnished brass - reloaders use it when tumbling.
    The label on this old can I found is pretty adamant about not using it in anything aluminum. Also there's a warning about not mixing it with hot water. Must be some good powerful stuff.

  17. #42
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    Re: Welding zinc coated chain

    Quote Originally Posted by HT2-4956 View Post
    The label on this old can I found is pretty adamant about not using it in anything aluminum. Also there's a warning about not mixing it with hot water. Must be some good powerful stuff.
    You can buy it as drain cleaner.

    It develops heat as it reacts and as most chemical reactions the hotter it is, the faster it goes. So you can mix it with hot water if you want a stronger faster reaction. But it might get really hot.

    Just remember to pour the sodium hydroxide in the water and not the other way around. This goes for acids too. Add the acid to the water, not water to the acid.

  18. #43
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    Re: Welding zinc coated chain

    Petey,

    I don't know how interested you are in Chemistry but this guy here has some pretty good tales of chemical experiments going sideways in dramatic fashion. I think some of them are pretty dam funny also.

    Things I won't work with by Derek Lowe...

    http://blogs.sciencemag.org/pipeline...wont-work-with

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