"Blowing out" welding machine for maintenance
RSS | Subscribe | Contact Us | Advertise | About Us
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Near Traverse City, Mi.
    Posts
    193

    "Blowing out" welding machine for maintenance

    Well, I have seen it written several times that you should take the covers off and blow out the dust as regular maintenance.

    Question is:

    1. Do you all actually do this?
    2. Is it worth the risk of ****ing something up?
    3. Are there any tips or tricks associated with either of my machines? Lincoln210mp and dynasty280dx. Both have low hours. The dynasty about 10hrs/wk. Of actual arc time, the Lincoln less. Both have covers when not in use.
    4. Should I do It? I am more concerned with the dynasty. Certainly don't want to good a warranty or screw something up that's working fine.
    Miller Dynasty 280 DX, Lincoln 210 MP

  2. #2

    Re: "Blowing out" welding machine for maintenance

    Quote Originally Posted by jakedaawg View Post
    Well, I have seen it written several times that you should take the covers off and blow out the dust as regular maintenance.

    Question is:

    1. Do you all actually do this?
    2. Is it worth the risk of ****ing something up?
    3. Are there any tips or tricks associated with either of my machines? Lincoln210mp and dynasty280dx. Both have low hours. The dynasty about 10hrs/wk. Of actual arc time, the Lincoln less. Both have covers when not in use.
    4. Should I do It? I am more concerned with the dynasty. Certainly don't want to good a warranty or screw something up that's working fine.
    I do cleaning on my welders ever year with air low pressure
    My welders where still working after 30 years

    Dave
    Last edited by smithdoor; 05-15-2018 at 06:59 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    1,853

    Re: "Blowing out" welding machine for maintenance

    Quote Originally Posted by jakedaawg View Post
    Well, I have seen it written several times that you should take the covers off and blow out the dust as regular maintenance.

    Question is:

    1. Do you all actually do this?
    2. Is it worth the risk of ****ing something up?
    3. Are there any tips or tricks associated with either of my machines? Lincoln210mp and dynasty280dx. Both have low hours. The dynasty about 10hrs/wk. Of actual arc time, the Lincoln less. Both have covers when not in use.
    4. Should I do It? I am more concerned with the dynasty. Certainly don't want to good a warranty or screw something up that's working fine.
    If you’re worried turn down the pressure on your compresor to 50psi or so. You’re just blowing dust off you don’t need a leaf blower.
    www.FirehouseFabricators.com



    Lincoln 210mp
    Lincoln SW200

  4. #4

    Re: "Blowing out" welding machine for maintenance

    The reason for cleaning in fine metal filling get in side the welders

    The new welders today may 2 or 3 times a year. They have electronic boards this may cleaning for electronic too.

    Dave

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Mars
    Posts
    14

    Re: "Blowing out" welding machine for maintenance

    I blow out all the machines in the shop every couple months.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    St. Johns, Michigan
    Posts
    69

    Re: "Blowing out" welding machine for maintenance

    Low air pressure is probably a good thing when dusting off your welder, years ago I bought a back up used Syncrowave 250 from a local college. It was in mint condition, everything tested out perfect. I pulled the side panels and blew all the dust out of it, didn't bother turning down the air pressure. Installed the panels and re tested no go, it was so long ago I forget what didn't work at the time but I do remember it cost me $800.00 after taking it in to a Miller shop to replace the main board! I asked the tech what could have happened and he asked me if I blew it out with high pressure compressed air, he noticed that it was clean inside.. So I told him yes I did just like I have many times in the past, he said most likely on the small metal pieces got lodged some where on the board and shorted it out.
    Pete




    ESAB SVI300
    ESAB MIG 4 HD
    MILLER PASSPORT 180
    MILLER DYNASTY 300DX
    MILLER COOLMATE 4
    MILLER 30A
    MILLER SPECTRUM 2050
    C&K WF-3

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,584

    Re: "Blowing out" welding machine for maintenance

    Quote Originally Posted by pgk View Post
    ...I asked the tech what could have happened and he asked me if I blew it out with high pressure compressed air, he noticed that it was clean inside.. So I told him yes I did just like I have many times in the past, he said most likely on the small metal pieces got lodged some where on the board and shorted it out.
    OUCH.

    I always wondered about that happening...
    Syncrowave 250DX
    Miller 330 A/BP
    Miller Big Blue 251D

  8. #8

    Re: "Blowing out" welding machine for maintenance

    Quote Originally Posted by pgk View Post
    Low air pressure is probably a good thing when dusting off your welder, years ago I bought a back up used Syncrowave 250 from a local college. It was in mint condition, everything tested out perfect. I pulled the side panels and blew all the dust out of it, didn't bother turning down the air pressure. Installed the panels and re tested no go, it was so long ago I forget what didn't work at the time but I do remember it cost me $800.00 after taking it in to a Miller shop to replace the main board! I asked the tech what could have happened and he asked me if I blew it out with high pressure compressed air, he noticed that it was clean inside.. So I told him yes I did just like I have many times in the past, he said most likely on the small metal pieces got lodged some where on the board and shorted it out.
    In past post I said use electronic cleaner

    (They have electronic boards this may cleaning for electronic too.)

    Dave

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-J320A using Tapatalk
    HF 170 welder
    HF 4x6 band saw
    South Bend 9N
    Mill
    B&D mag drill
    Victor torch

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Charlottetown,PE.Canada
    Posts
    701

    Re: "Blowing out" welding machine for maintenance

    Monthly here, (we're dusty), usually don't take the covers off, just blow there the vent louvers from front to back, then back to front

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    AJO, ARIZONA
    Posts
    308

    Re: "Blowing out" welding machine for maintenance

    One thing to watch for is static electricity, it may well be generated from your air nozzle/blow gun irregardless of pressure, static electricity and electronics often do not play well together. Many older welders used asbestos for insulation, I started blowing out my old Midstates with the cover off and after getting some of the dust gone it was obvious that everything was wrapped in asbestos tape strips. I shut down the blowing and put the welder back together.
    NRA LIFE MEMBER
    UNITWELD 175 AMP 3 IN1 DC MIG/STICK/TIG
    MIDSTATES 300 AMP AC MACHINE 100% DUTY CYCLE
    DAD SAYS, "IF YA AIN'T GONNA USE YOUR HEAD, YOU BOUT AS WELL HAVE TWO A$$HOLES."
    GOD BLESS AMERICA!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    2,678

    Re: "Blowing out" welding machine for maintenance

    Using a shop vac is maybe better. Power off and use a narrow plastic nozzle to get the small areas. Make sure you turn off the power and never assume it is safe. If your unit has capacitors they could still hold a charge.
    Worst I saw was a guy in a rush who took a cutting torch to blow the dust out. The dust explosion was loud enough to be heard in the office. He had a red face from a light burn for a few days. The machine was toast as well as the torch.
    Other caution is that you might be blowing out a mouse nest. A cousin of my foreman died from Hantavirus. They could not figure it out for weeks until the autopsy results came back. Everyone figured he had breathed something toxic from welding.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Not there
    Posts
    1,804

    Re: "Blowing out" welding machine for maintenance

    I blow mine out with the "blow" side on my shop vac.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Not there
    Posts
    1,804

    Re: "Blowing out" welding machine for maintenance

    Quote Originally Posted by lotechman View Post
    Using a shop vac is maybe better. Power off and use a narrow plastic nozzle to get the small areas. Make sure you turn off the power and never assume it is safe. If your unit has capacitors they could still hold a charge.
    Worst I saw was a guy in a rush who took a cutting torch to blow the dust out. The dust explosion was loud enough to be heard in the office. He had a red face from a light burn for a few days. The machine was toast as well as the torch.
    Other caution is that you might be blowing out a mouse nest. A cousin of my foreman died from Hantavirus. They could not figure it out for weeks until the autopsy results came back. Everyone figured he had breathed something toxic from welding.
    A dude actually used a set of torches to BLOW OUT a welding machine ? Is he still welding or did he run for office ( and win) ?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    78

    Re: "Blowing out" welding machine for maintenance

    Quote Originally Posted by jakedaawg View Post
    Well, I have seen it written several times that you should take the covers off and blow out the dust as regular maintenance.

    Question is:

    1. Do you all actually do this?
    2. Is it worth the risk of ****ing something up?
    3. Are there any tips or tricks associated with either of my machines? Lincoln210mp and dynasty280dx. Both have low hours. The dynasty about 10hrs/wk. Of actual arc time, the Lincoln less. Both have covers when not in use.
    4. Should I do It? I am more concerned with the dynasty. Certainly don't want to good a warranty or screw something up that's working fine.
    The Dynasty 280 uses a wind tunnel arrangement for cooling where the air comes in the front and travels through a duct to the rear of the machine where it only blows air through the heat sinks. Limited use with the machine covered should stay pretty in the sides where all the sensitive electronics reside but are not having dirt pulled in by the fan spread across them at all. I justv pulled off my covers recently and the outer compartments were almost as clean as the day it was made. The are really easy to get apart so take a look and see if you don't find yours quite prestine inside yet also. But sure if you have it open I would still blow it out good and from both direction though the tunnel to try and dislodge any buildup on the het sinks in the back and clean the fan if it is dirty. Even the fan blade on mine was very clean. It is just in my air conditioned garage and doesn't see daily or even weekly use so I didn't expect it to be too bad but honestly as clean as it was I wsted my time but it gave me piece of mind knowing it wasn't getting some buildup inside. Was thrilled to see how clean it still was in there everywhere.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    AJO, ARIZONA
    Posts
    308

    Re: "Blowing out" welding machine for maintenance

    The shop vac can create static electricity also, if you are going to use air or a vac, get a static ground strap to protect the electronics, a simple wire connected to the vac hose or the air nozzle and to an electrical ground path on the machine will work, older machines with no electronics won't matter.
    Last edited by CAVEMANN; 05-18-2018 at 11:09 AM.
    NRA LIFE MEMBER
    UNITWELD 175 AMP 3 IN1 DC MIG/STICK/TIG
    MIDSTATES 300 AMP AC MACHINE 100% DUTY CYCLE
    DAD SAYS, "IF YA AIN'T GONNA USE YOUR HEAD, YOU BOUT AS WELL HAVE TWO A$$HOLES."
    GOD BLESS AMERICA!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
RSS | Home | Penton Media | Contact Us | Subscribe | For Advertisers | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement