Process for padding beads?
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  1. #1
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    Process for padding beads?

    How many beads do you run before you cool the pad off and clean off the slag? The idea of running one 4 - 6" bead, cooling it off, wire brushing the slag, then starting the next bead is rather daunting. It would take forever to fill a 6 x 6 pad.

    The whole point as I see it is to build control and muscle memory but if you have a prolonged stop after every bead is that accomplishing what you're after? I've been running bead after bead until they start running funny when the pad gets too hot before I cool it off and wire brush the slag but am wondering if that's a bad method?

  2. #2
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    Re: Process for padding beads?

    One thing you can do is use 4 or more of the 6x6 pads clamped to a longer piece of steel and run one bead on each one. Then go back and chip/brush off the slag and run another bead on each. This gives each pad a chance to cool off on it's own some between beads. When they all seem to be too hot, hose them all off to cool and start over. Using just the one pad concentrates all the heat into just that one with no time in between for any cooling to take place. If they are all clamped to a thick piece of steel, that can help act as a heat sink too, to draw out heat faster between beads.

  3. #3
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    Re: Process for padding beads?

    Use longer plates - 12" to 24" long.

    Way more time welding that way in my opinion.

    Little plates just heat up too fast.
    Dave J.

    Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance. ~George Bernard Shaw~

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  4. #4
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    Re: Process for padding beads?

    Buy more plates. :idea:

  5. #5
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    Re: Process for padding beads?

    Larger plate like Dave said... part of the reason to do this exercise is to learn to weld. If you don't stop to clean and inspect each weld to see if you're doing things right then you can't improve.
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  6. #6
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    Re: Process for padding beads?

    I also think having multiple plates is a good idea. Possibly a little thicker also (say 3/8 vs. 1/4).

    When it comes to quenching your plate off....give it repeated quick dips and try and leave enough heat in it that it'll steam itself off dry in 30 seconds or less after the last dip. Then just give it a quick rake with your de-slagging tool of choice, and a token wire brushing and put another bead (or three) on it. It's padding practice not a code groove weld that's going to get x-rayed.

  7. #7
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    Re: Process for padding beads?

    I started wondering about the process when I saw padding practice on youtube (Jody and others) and good padding samples on here. All were on relatively small plates, maybe the 6" size I mentioned. And all the ones I remember looked really good, like someone ran one bead, cooled it off, brushed the slag then carefully laid another one halfway on the first. So I thought "wow, if that's how it's supposed to be done I must be doing it wrong." and thought I'd ask.

  8. #8
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    Re: Process for padding beads?

    As a new guy that’s been doing a bunch of pads. I’ve been running 1/8” rod on 3/8” A36 plates. Usually 6x6 or 10x10”. Idea overlap is 1/3rd bead width I’ve been told, it is a good idea to cool off every few. I did some non cooled pads, and as rigid as a piece of 6x6” 3/8” steel plate is, heat will curl it like a potato chip. Also excessively hot metal holds on to slag more aggressively, which means more time chipping and brushing those last few pieces.
    -Mark Smith

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  9. #9
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    Re: Process for padding beads?

    Quote Originally Posted by JD1 View Post
    I started wondering about the process when I saw padding practice on youtube (Jody and others) and good padding samples on here. All were on relatively small plates, maybe the 6" size I mentioned. And all the ones I remember looked really good, like someone ran one bead, cooled it off, brushed the slag then carefully laid another one halfway on the first. So I thought "wow, if that's how it's supposed to be done I must be doing it wrong." and thought I'd ask.
    JD1,

    It certainly wouldn't hurt to have something bigger than 6" to practice on. In fact if you had something big enough that you couldn't get all the way across it with one rod you get more practice at restarting welds and getting a smooth transition from one bead to the next.

    What size and shape material you're running beads on is not as important as to just keep running beads on something.

    If you can find a piece of heavy angle iron you can start practicing laying up multi pass fillet welds. If you fill something like this even half way you get a lot a practice.

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  10. #10
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    Re: Process for padding beads?

    How's this for some serious horizontal padding practice?

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  11. #11
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    Re: Process for padding beads?

    Quote Originally Posted by HT2-4956 View Post
    How's this for some serious horizontal padding practice?

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    Appears to meet minimum acceptable guidelines to pass visual
    Dave J.

    Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance. ~George Bernard Shaw~

    Airco 300 - Syncro 350
    Invertec v250-s
    Thermal Arc 161 and 300
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    Tried being normal once, didn't take....I think it was a Tuesday.

  12. #12
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    Re: Process for padding beads?

    Quote Originally Posted by HT2-4956 View Post
    JD1,
    In fact if you had something big enough that you couldn't get all the way across it with one rod you get more practice at restarting welds and getting a smooth transition from one bead to the next.
    Good idea. Turns it into more than just running rows of beads. I'll do that.

  13. #13

    Re: Process for padding beads?

    In my class they have us run a bead, stop clean inspect reason what your doing wrong and then run the next with overlap. This gives a little time for cooking, we quench about every 3 beads with the size we use. Take it for what's it worth, I cant if it's right or wrong but that's what my instructor has us do.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  14. #14
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    Re: Process for padding beads?

    [/QUOTE]The whole point as I see it is to build control and muscle memory but if you have a prolonged stop after every bead is that accomplishing what you're after? I've been running bead after bead until they start running funny when the pad gets too hot before I cool it off and wire brush the slag but am wondering if that's a bad method?[/QUOTE]

    The hole point of padding beads is to learn/practice what drag angle, work angle, arc length, travel speed, electrode manipulation and selected welding amperage does to your bead.



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    Jason
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  15. #15
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    Re: Process for padding beads?

    The whole point as I see it is to build control and muscle memory but if you have a prolonged stop after every bead is that accomplishing what you're after?
    That's probably not the point. The point (IMO) is to practice, with extreme intention on every bead, so that you learn. if you are making mistakes while you build muscle memory you aren't doing yourself any good.You can't practice with intention if you are not removing slag and inspecting the bead each time. Again, IMO.
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  16. #16
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    Re: Process for padding beads?

    Quote Originally Posted by HT2-4956 View Post
    How's this for some serious horizontal padding practice?

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    That looks like roughly a 6" pad. What was your process? Run one bead, de-slag, repeat 2 or 3 times, quench, then do more?
    Last edited by JD1; Today at 07:39 AM.

  17. #17
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    Re: Process for padding beads?

    Quote Originally Posted by JD1 View Post
    That looks like roughly a 6" pad. What was your process? Run one bead, de-slag, repeat 2 or 3 times, quench, then do more?
    One of the tricks to getting a nice horizontal pad built up quickly is to not chip your slag after each rod. The slag on the previous (lower) bead gives you more of a shelf to set the next bead on. You can run a heavier bead that way with out it sagging. You start at the bottom and work up until you have a layer on and then you chip and wire brush that whole layer before starting the next layer.

    There was no "quenching" involved. In fact there was a 400 F. preheat maintained on that while welding. There's enough mass there that the part getting over heated wasn't a problem.

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