FCAW Farm Code Welding
RSS | Subscribe | Contact Us | Advertise | About Us
Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    82

    FCAW Farm Code Welding

    The more welding I do, the more I lean on trusty E71T-11 for my repair welds. I MIG clean stuff in the shop when fabricating something. And I occasionally stick weld some things. But for everyday "farm code" types of repairs I find myself using standard gasless flux core. I recently bought a Lincoln Ranger 305G and a Miller 8VS feeder to go with it. I now keep the feeder loaded with .045 Hobart 21B E71T-11 all the time. Many, if not most of the welding I do is repair type of stuff that is too difficult or time consuming to make clean. The FCAW wire eats through rust and paint OK....not great like a 6010/11 rod. The trick I have found that works the best is on really dirty stuff to make a small stringer bead, expecting a bit of porosity (nature of the wire on really dirty stuff). Then I come back over it with a larger weave pass burned in good and hot. The second weld always comes out good, burning its way through the porosity in the first smaller weld. I know this is not X-Ray quality stuff. The is again, farm code welding. I have never had a failure of my FCAW welds. If I have something super critical, I'll clean it properly and burn a 7018.

    The FCAW wire is great for bridging gaps on less than good fitups. Not to mention I can run circles around stick welding in productivity. Am I the only one using this method with FCAW?
    Lincoln Ranger 305g
    Miller X-Treme 8VS Suitcase Feeder
    Lincoln Powermig 210 MP
    Lincoln AC225 Tombstone
    Everlast Powerarc 200ST
    A pile of grinders.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Laredo, Tx
    Posts
    3,510

    Re: FCAW Farm Code Welding

    I lean on gasless flux core a lot as well, well whenever I take on a project that is not too clean and it dont matter what it ends up looking like. I always weld outside and many times the breeze is up so E71T11 is good to go. I gotta play around with a 0.030" spool on my new MIG and dial in some settings to use up a couple spools.
    1st person on WeldingWeb to have a scrolling signature!

    HTP Invertig 221 D.V. Water-cooled
    HTP Pro Pulse 300 MIG
    Millermatic 211 Inv. MIG w/ Spoolmate 150
    Eastwood 40A Plasma

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    west texas
    Posts
    2,281

    Re: FCAW Farm Code Welding

    I'm starting to do more of this. I should probably find my self a miller 211 powered off 240v power and load it with 0.035 flux core.
    old Miller spectrum 625
    Lincoln SP-135 T, CO2+0.025 wire
    Miller model 250 and WP-18V torch
    Craftsman 100amp AC/DC and WP-17V torch
    Century 115-004 HF arc stabilizer
    Home made 4 transformer spot welder
    Home made alternator welder

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    239

    Re: FCAW Farm Code Welding

    As an example, I welded a small with getting porosity in most of the weld. Then make another pass, then another. In shirt, a lot of porosity will still be there as you never fixed the main problem which was paint/rust/whatever. I did this experiment and then ground the welds out only to find smaller porosity bubbles, but in general it was the same amount.

    I'm all about the farm code and getting equipment running as I live in a large farm area, but remember, your starts and stops determine how fast it will break again.

    Sent from my 2PS64 using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,911

    Re: FCAW Farm Code Welding

    ya, i like innershield too, and think mig is much overused in innappropiate situations. anyway, if u havent already, if/when u got $300+ to spend, get a profax 1260 gun, (copy of lincoln k126) w/ some different angles/ long/short goosnecks.
    Last edited by 123weld; 07-10-2018 at 11:34 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    21

    Re: FCAW Farm Code Welding

    All I use is Innershield (NR 233) I rebuild mining machinery and heavy equipment, mostly the buckets and dozer blades and so on, Im outside on top of a mountain most of the time and the wind never stops, so I have no use for gas shielded wire. The Innershield burn through rusty dirty stuff as well, I do try to clean up first to make a better root and so on but sometimes you can spend hours cleaning up crap, when all your doin is welding a chunk of iron on for a wear plate. There is a time to be fussy and a time to get it on get it done. sometimes I use stick if I need to...broken booms for instance, most of the folks that make this stuff call for repairs to be made with 7018..and once again...there is a time to be fussy and a time to get it done. I love Innershield...welders best friend if he is workin outside. And the fella that recommended the 1260 Profax gun ...he is right, the thing or the Miller ironmate 1260 or the one from Lincoln (they are all the same thing, parts are interchangeable) its worth its weight in gold
    Last edited by Popeye an old miner; 07-11-2018 at 10:13 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Eastern Pa
    Posts
    63

    Re: FCAW Farm Code Welding

    Before I got the stickmate all I had was the lincoln 180 mig machine. I'm always welding outside so I've never actually run mig wire through it. everything I did for the longest time was flux core. Built 3 trailers and a bunch of tractor attachments with .030 71-11

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    82

    Re: FCAW Farm Code Welding

    It is soooooo much faster. In the last two days I've welded a hitch receiver on my box blade and a fire grate for my dad. I'm getting ready to weld a chain hook in a few minutes. And then tomorrow night I'm welding a plow on a garden tractor for a buddy of mine. All of this done with Hobart Fabshield 21B .045 in my Miller 8VS suitcase feeder in less than perfectly clean metal. I rarely use stick anymore. I've got the feeder dialed in about perfect. For thinner stuff, 16V and 120 WFS. Thicker stuff I turn it up to about 18/160. Occasionally I might even go a bit hotter than that if I really need to burn something in. A 10lb roll lasts a long time doing repair work.
    Lincoln Ranger 305g
    Miller X-Treme 8VS Suitcase Feeder
    Lincoln Powermig 210 MP
    Lincoln AC225 Tombstone
    Everlast Powerarc 200ST
    A pile of grinders.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    82

    Re: FCAW Farm Code Welding

    Chain hook welded on. Two passes with the beveled bottom of the hook.
    Lincoln Ranger 305g
    Miller X-Treme 8VS Suitcase Feeder
    Lincoln Powermig 210 MP
    Lincoln AC225 Tombstone
    Everlast Powerarc 200ST
    A pile of grinders.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Eastern Pa
    Posts
    63

    Re: FCAW Farm Code Welding

    You are correct. to be honest I'm really not sure why flux core is not more popular with the farmers then stick. Its easy to learn way faster and the 10lbs spools last awhile if your only doing repairs. A machine like mine is only a hundred dollars or so more than the AC/DC buzz boxes. And fcaw is way cheaper on electricity vs. the transformer type stick machines unless your running with a worn out contact tip.

    sometimes you do get a bad spool thats got contaminates in it though and you can't do anything to stop the porosity, but just get a new spool and your back in business. I've heard of that happening in stick electrodes too so its not like that can only happen with flux core.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    21

    Re: FCAW Farm Code Welding

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark_D View Post
    It is soooooo much faster. In the last two days I've welded a hitch receiver on my box blade and a fire grate for my dad. I'm getting ready to weld a chain hook in a few minutes. And then tomorrow night I'm welding a plow on a garden tractor for a buddy of mine. All of this done with Hobart Fabshield 21B .045 in my Miller 8VS suitcase feeder in less than perfectly clean metal. I rarely use stick anymore. I've got the feeder dialed in about perfect. For thinner stuff, 16V and 120 WFS. Thicker stuff I turn it up to about 18/160. Occasionally I might even go a bit hotter than that if I really need to burn something in. A 10lb roll lasts a long time doing repair work.
    10 lb roll? That would last about 3 hours where I work...but then again I weld stuff anywhere from an inch to 3 inches thick 6 to 12 feet long...these buckets are huge. 25 pound of NR 233 last about 5 hours...I usually go to work with 4 rolls in the rig

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Not there
    Posts
    2,230

    Re: FCAW Farm Code Welding

    Quote Originally Posted by Popeye an old miner View Post
    10 lb roll? That would last about 3 hours where I work...but then again I weld stuff anywhere from an inch to 3 inches thick 6 to 12 feet long...these buckets are huge. 25 pound of NR 233 last about 5 hours...I usually go to work with 4 rolls in the rig
    Draglining eh ? 233 is impact resistant too ? Prolly spendy !

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    west texas
    Posts
    2,281

    Re: FCAW Farm Code Welding

    You can pickup a plug in stick welder from your local tractor and agg auction for $40 to $350. AC only machines go for cheap, AC and DC machines go for a little more.
    I hardly ever see wire welders and when I do they are usually appear to be junk.
    old Miller spectrum 625
    Lincoln SP-135 T, CO2+0.025 wire
    Miller model 250 and WP-18V torch
    Craftsman 100amp AC/DC and WP-17V torch
    Century 115-004 HF arc stabilizer
    Home made 4 transformer spot welder
    Home made alternator welder

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    357

    Re: FCAW Farm Code Welding

    Not related to FCAW at all, but this thread reminds my of the old "gap fill" technique with stick, when you have a decent gap to fill, break the flux off of a stick rod, and while welding one handed with the stick use that bare wire as extra filler (kinda like TIG welding) to fill the gap.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    615

    Re: FCAW Farm Code Welding

    Quote Originally Posted by Popeye an old miner View Post
    All I use is Innershield (NR 233) I rebuild mining machinery and heavy equipment, mostly the buckets and dozer blades and so on, Im outside on top of a mountain most of the time and the wind never stops, so I have no use for gas shielded wire. The Innershield burn through rusty dirty stuff as well, I do try to clean up first to make a better root and so on but sometimes you can spend hours cleaning up crap, when all your doin is welding a chunk of iron on for a wear plate. There is a time to be fussy and a time to get it on get it done. sometimes I use stick if I need to...broken booms for instance, most of the folks that make this stuff call for repairs to be made with 7018..and once again...there is a time to be fussy and a time to get it done. I love Innershield...welders best friend if he is workin outside. And the fella that recommended the 1260 Profax gun ...he is right, the thing or the Miller ironmate 1260 or the one from Lincoln (they are all the same thing, parts are interchangeable) its worth its weight in gold
    The "Farm Code" absolutely has its benefits and its place. With many things you just have to roll with it rather than fighting to make that code quality structural/pressure weld.

    It ain't goin to the moon! The key is a good understanding of where that line between the two is.

    jrw159

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Eastern Pa
    Posts
    63

    Re: FCAW Farm Code Welding

    Quote Originally Posted by Popeye an old miner View Post
    10 lb roll? That would last about 3 hours where I work...but then again I weld stuff anywhere from an inch to 3 inches thick 6 to 12 feet long...these buckets are huge. 25 pound of NR 233 last about 5 hours...I usually go to work with 4 rolls in the rig
    That sounds similar to the place I was building crane booms at. they had a robotic type jig at one station that had 4 25lbs mig rollers on it. at least once a day I'd see em changing out the wire on it. and we were only doing like 5/16-1/4 inch plate. Just super long welds. The wire at my station would last about a month just doing tack welds all day.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    21

    Re: FCAW Farm Code Welding

    Quote Originally Posted by Bonzoo View Post
    Draglining eh ? 233 is impact resistant too ? Prolly spendy !
    The wire itself isn't impact or abrasion resisitant, but I peen the livin crap out of it with a needle scaler...what I do a lot of times if ive got the time is bevel it under the plate which is usually AR 400 plate or harder and run the weld under the plate and then make a nice fillet or lap weld on the side. Kind of hard to explain here without drawing it but I think you get the idea...the weasr plate has to werar into the weld before it pops off. We do dragline buckets and all the parts to link it all together, dozer blades, big trakhoe buckets, face shovels, loaders haul tracks and so on, all the equipment they use in the mines. We do the busted frames and booms and so on as well, and weve got a couple of fellas that do the line boring and these folks keep them pretty busy. Its a good job and I enjoy it, some days are rougher than others at this age, I don't enjoy workin on rainy days but I do if I have too, the guy im contracted to will call me the day before a lot of times if its supposed to rain a lot and ask me if I wanna stay home...some days I do some days I don't.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    21

    Re: FCAW Farm Code Welding

    Quote Originally Posted by jrw159 View Post
    The "Farm Code" absolutely has its benefits and its place. With many things you just have to roll with it rather than fighting to make that code quality structural/pressure weld.

    It ain't goin to the moon! The key is a good understanding of where that line between the two is.

    jrw159
    That's what I am talkin about...why spend hours cleaning up and makin everything smooth as a babys butt when all your gonna do is weld a piece of AR plate on it... now the broken boom..there is a different scenario altogether..that thing is bearing the weight of the bucket and all its goodies attached to it and the load that's in the bucket...if the boom breaks and comes through the cab and Ollie the operator eats the boom I am gonna feel like hammered dog**** for the rest of my life... so yeah you get damn fussy with the whole process clean up, fit, alignment and the weld itself. And that has happened a few years ago a boom broke up north of here and the boom came through the cab and drove the operator out the back of the cab and crushed him into the house of the shovel...not a pretty sight at all from I been told. so you use your head asd be fussy where its called for.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    On the side of a mountain, PA
    Posts
    24

    Re: FCAW Farm Code Welding

    Quote Originally Posted by ttoks View Post
    Not related to FCAW at all, but this thread reminds my of the old "gap fill" technique with stick, when you have a decent gap to fill, break the flux off of a stick rod, and while welding one handed with the stick use that bare wire as extra filler (kinda like TIG welding) to fill the gap.
    Texas Tig we call it

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    357

    Re: FCAW Farm Code Welding

    Quote Originally Posted by Popeye an old miner View Post
    10 lb roll? That would last about 3 hours where I work...but then again I weld stuff anywhere from an inch to 3 inches thick 6 to 12 feet long...these buckets are huge. 25 pound of NR 233 last about 5 hours...I usually go to work with 4 rolls in the rig
    I know what your saying, where I work two guys building bucket wheel excavator pads are going through 2000 pounds of gas shielded flux core per month, and that's only working 8 hours a day 5 days per week, when the pressure is on and the overtime starts they go through another thousand pounds a month, not to mention the 3000 pounds of sub arc wire and 1500 pounds of sub arc flux that go's into them.

    I recently (well mid last year) worked on a job repairing the exhaust ducting of a 500 megawatt gas turbine generator where the 6 guys burned through 9'500 pounds of duel shield wire in two weeks, each guy was burning a 33 pound roll of 3/32 wire in 3 hours on average working 12 hours a day 6 days a week for two weeks, we had an assistant whose job it was to constantly move wire up 70 feet of scaffold to the job front and remove the waste just to keep us supplied and not buried in rubbish.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    102

    Re: FCAW Farm Code Welding

    Quote Originally Posted by ttoks View Post
    I know what your saying, where I work two guys building bucket wheel excavator pads are going through 2000 pounds of gas shielded flux core per month, and that's only working 8 hours a day 5 days per week, when the pressure is on and the overtime starts they go through another thousand pounds a month, not to mention the 3000 pounds of sub arc wire and 1500 pounds of sub arc flux that go's into them.

    I recently (well mid last year) worked on a job repairing the exhaust ducting of a 500 megawatt gas turbine generator where the 6 guys burned through 9'500 pounds of duel shield wire in two weeks, each guy was burning a 33 pound roll of 3/32 wire in 3 hours on average working 12 hours a day 6 days a week for two weeks, we had an assistant whose job it was to constantly move wire up 70 feet of scaffold to the job front and remove the waste just to keep us supplied and not buried in rubbish.
    Those welders burned alot of wire alright but I'll bet the assistant that carried all of it up to them was the toughest one of the bunch.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
RSS | Home | Penton Media | Contact Us | Subscribe | For Advertisers | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement