Garage door insulation
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  1. #1
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    Garage door insulation

    I think I want to tackle putting some insulation up on my door this weekend replacing the seal to prepare for the cold months ahead.
    Anyone have any kits or recommendation as to what they used with good results and is rated for high temp. My one door is right next to my plasma cnc. And it doesn't see directly sparks I want to be safe just in case it did get blasted

    I found this and it seems inexpensive and says exceeds all fire codes. However I would need a few kits to do it.
    https://www.amazon.com/Reach-Barrier...oor+insulation
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  2. #2
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    Quote Originally Posted by Gamble View Post
    I think I want to tackle putting some insulation up on my door this weekend replacing the seal to prepare for the cold months ahead.
    Anyone have any kits or recommendation as to what they used with good results and is rated for high temp. My one door is right next to my plasma cnc. And it doesn't see directly sparks I want to be safe just in case it did get blasted

    I found this and it seems inexpensive and says exceeds all fire codes. However I would need a few kits to do it.
    https://www.amazon.com/Reach-Barrier...oor+insulation
    I was going to mention it in the other thread I started, but I used to install and repair garage doors, so if you need any assistance, I'd come help out. I've never added insulation, but can do door seals, and if you have a front torsion setup for lifting your door, you'll want to install heavier springs if you add insulation. Most of the insulated doors that get sold are double paneled, and don't have the insulation exposed. The ones that don't still have a heavy paper board covering it. So whatever you choose to hold the insulation in can be your flame retardant barrier.

    I have the tools needed to change out springs and only takes about 30 minutes of everything goes straight forward if you get to that point. I have a gauge to check your spring size or it might be painted on the spring itself. You can just order the next size up springs and call it good, or try to figure an actual weight for your door and find the exact size.

    When springs are ready to break, they tend to break as soon as winter temps start, and adding weight to the door would make it a little more likely. So I would definitely consider upgrading the springs when you do it.

  3. #3
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    Oh and from what I remember, the insulated doors we sold had an R9 rating, so that's what you would expect from a factory purchased insulated door.

  4. #4
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    Actually I think I'm mixing up my memories. I think the R9 is the value of Reflectix I used in my camper, which actually looks exactly like that insulation kit you showed.

  5. #5
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    I ordered a kit to try it out. I want to change the springs and get a new opener just so they don't break on me when I need it open. I did put on nylon wheels already but it's still pretty loud at a few spots. Kind of annoying.
    I want something maybe belt driven since it will be quiet. I got a quote but the guy wanted like $550 for the opener installed and then like $265 for the springs. Seems really high. I've done springs before with a friend who did it for a living. It's not hard just dangerous and the springs are inexpensive. I'll get it done one day just when i find a better price
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  6. #6
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    I could install everything for you and tune up your door of you find an opener you like. They have some pretty fancy Liftmasters that you can connect to your home network, so you can control it with your phone if you are away from home, or get notifications if it's opened. I'll do it in exchange for some assistance later on when Im ready to put together a CNC plasma table haha.

  7. #7
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    And I would recommend a LiftMaster opener, just because I've never had to do any warranty work on them or replace any of the newer ones. I've replaced a lot of craftsman though.

  8. #8
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    Liftmaster is a division of Chamberlain and are a pretty good operator. Chamberlain manufactures many of the ones private labeled in this country and has for many years. Genie, and Stanley are still manufactured in house as are a couple of others but Chamberlain has the lion's share of the market. I like side mount jackshaft operators myself with at least a 1/2hp rating. Both of my 14X18 CHI doors with an "R-16" rating are opened with Liftmaster 1hp operators but that's overkill for a home shop.
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  9. #9
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    I split R13 batts in half (thickness) then capped with aluminum roof valley material. The 24" aluminum would flex enough to let me pop it into the C-channel of the formed metal door panels and stay with no fasteners. I tried steel valley material first but it was too heavy.
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  10. #10
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    Quote Originally Posted by Slob View Post
    Liftmaster is a division of Chamberlain and are a pretty good operator. Chamberlain manufactures many of the ones private labeled in this country and has for many years. Genie, and Stanley are still manufactured in house as are a couple of others but Chamberlain has the lion's share of the market. I like side mount jackshaft operators myself with at least a 1/2hp rating. Both of my 14X18 CHI doors with an "R-16" rating are opened with Liftmaster 1hp operators but that's overkill for a home shop.
    Those do make a nice clean install, but most of the time I've installed those was because they didn't have the head room for the rail and operator, but that usually means I'm still fighting for room in the corner to put the side mount.

  11. #11
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBFA View Post
    Those do make a nice clean install, but most of the time I've installed those was because they didn't have the head room for the rail and operator, but that usually means I'm still fighting for room in the corner to put the side mount.
    Years ago, (in a former life) I installed overhead doors and serviced many incorrect or substandard installs. I always pushed for torsion springs balanced at 45 to 50% load and side mount operators. Installed a few up in the attic and either chain, or belt drive the torsion shaft when clearance was a problem. They seemed to be so much more reliable on a high cyclical rate than the chain or shuttle types and ran much longer than those types.

    Definitely worth the extra cost up from IMO. Oil, can't stress enough the importance of keeping the torsion springs oiled.....
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  12. #12
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    Quote Originally Posted by Slob View Post
    Oil, can't stress enough the importance of keeping the torsion springs oiled.....
    I've never heard of oiling the springs, but it makes sense. What kind of oil would you recommend?
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  13. #13
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    Quote Originally Posted by steve45 View Post
    I've never heard of oiling the springs, but it makes sense. What kind of oil would you recommend?
    Any clean engine oil works well. Those springs grind upon one another as they load and unload. Pour or spray onto the top of the spring and allow it to run into the coils of wire through operating the door through several iterations. Will probably need to wipe the bottom of the coils to not leave a mess on the floor.
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  14. #14
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    What about this?
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  15. #15
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBFA View Post
    I could install everything for you and tune up your door of you find an opener you like. They have some pretty fancy Liftmasters that you can connect to your home network, so you can control it with your phone if you are away from home, or get notifications if it's opened. I'll do it in exchange for some assistance later on when Im ready to put together a CNC plasma table haha.
    Sounds like a deal to me
    Yea I want a quiet one with the home network setup and new springs. Save me a headache down the line
    Or I considered that jackshaft one but can’t find it with WiFi. That would eliminate the springs and give me some overhead storage
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  16. #16
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    Have you priced a new door with spring and track kit? They aren't all that bad.

    I have one of the cheap insulated doors. The one with the exposed inserts. It has worked fine for about 14 years now, but I won't be doing that again. Any doors from here on out will be steel on both sides and polyurethane foam in between. Also, I'll go for the thicker ones.
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  17. #17
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    I have insulated doors on my woodshop. Haas brand as I recall. R15 I think...

    The insulated doors have a lot more to them than just insulation. The panels are keyed and gasketed in addition to being insulated. There are special gaskets on the bottom, sides and top too.

    They work great.
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  18. #18
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    Quote Originally Posted by bigb View Post
    What about this?
    That stuff works alright too. However, a pint of motor oil and a 1" paintbrush kept for the purpose is a lot less expensive and more/better coverage. The sprays work very well in the tracks but I prefer a light grease as opposed to oil there.
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  19. #19
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    I bought some rolls of the reflective material and put that on both doors. These door face the sun in the summer and the material seems to have helped reduce the heat getting into the shop.
    I probably need to adjust the springs a little or try to oil the springs since the weight of insulation does seem to have affected doors a little.
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  20. #20
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    Quote Originally Posted by psacustomcreations View Post
    I bought some rolls of the reflective material and put that on both doors. These door face the sun in the summer and the material seems to have helped reduce the heat getting into the shop.
    I probably need to adjust the springs a little or try to oil the springs since the weight of insulation does seem to have affected doors a little.
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    You could try adding half a turn to each spring. You will need some form of rod, somewhere around the 3/8" mark, and somewhere between 12-20" long or so. Need two of them actually. The tools I have look to be about 1/2" rod with the ends milled down to fit in the holes in the hubs of the springs. The "danger" part of the springs is not understanding they are under tension and just releasing the grub screws without a tool to hold the hub from rotating. You just need the two bars that won't slip out of the holes. I would guess without looking that my bars are about 18", and the max pressure I've had to push with them feels to be no more than pushing up a 20lbs weight, so it's not hard to do at all. If you don't have material to make any, you could probably buy the actual tools from a garage door supply company for around $15-20.

    You just get one bar in, hold a little pressure upwards, then loosen up the two grub screws holding the hub to the torsion bar. Then roll that bar to tighten the spring upwards, and while still maintaining control of that bar, insert the next bar in the next hole, and take control with that one, making sure it feels secure, then pull the top bar out and roll the hub upwards again. That's half a turn.

    I would actually try it with only one spring first to see if it improves before trying the second spring too. They are meant to be wound one full rotation per foot of door opening (the hubs for the cable are exactly 12"circumference in most cases) but I throw in an extra 1/4 turn or two when they are new just for settling. A good tension would have the door being able to pull itself open once you open it to about the halfway point. Earlier than that and the springs are a little too tight. Oh and when you tighten the grub screws back, you want to slightly dig into the torsion tube, but not so much that you make it out of round, to the point you can't get the tube past the bearings when you need to change springs later on, or else you'll be stuck buying a new torsion tube.

  21. #21
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBFA View Post
    You could try adding half a turn to each spring. You will need some form of rod, somewhere around the 3/8" mark, and somewhere between 12-20" long or so. Need two of them actually. The tools I have look to be about 1/2" rod with the ends milled down to fit in the holes in the hubs of the springs. The "danger" part of the springs is not understanding they are under tension and just releasing the grub screws without a tool to hold the hub from rotating. You just need the two bars that won't slip out of the holes. I would guess without looking that my bars are about 18", and the max pressure I've had to push with them feels to be no more than pushing up a 20lbs weight, so it's not hard to do at all. If you don't have material to make any, you could probably buy the actual tools from a garage door supply company for around $15-20.

    You just get one bar in, hold a little pressure upwards, then loosen up the two grub screws holding the hub to the torsion bar. Then roll that bar to tighten the spring upwards, and while still maintaining control of that bar, insert the next bar in the next hole, and take control with that one, making sure it feels secure, then pull the top bar out and roll the hub upwards again. That's half a turn.

    I would actually try it with only one spring first to see if it improves before trying the second spring too. They are meant to be wound one full rotation per foot of door opening (the hubs for the cable are exactly 12"circumference in most cases) but I throw in an extra 1/4 turn or two when they are new just for settling. A good tension would have the door being able to pull itself open once you open it to about the halfway point. Earlier than that and the springs are a little too tight. Oh and when you tighten the grub screws back, you want to slightly dig into the torsion tube, but not so much that you make it out of round, to the point you can't get the tube past the bearings when you need to change springs later on, or else you'll be stuck buying a new torsion tube.
    Thanks. That's kind of the technique I expected to need to use. I have a box trailer at work that needs adjustment too so I will try it on that first before I do it while standing on a ladder.

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  22. #22
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    Even professionals in the Garage door trade have had incidents that have left them physically disabled or worse. There is a LOT of energy stored in the coils. I've found it to be money well spent for a professional house call!
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  23. #23
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    Quote Originally Posted by psacustomcreations View Post
    Thanks. That's kind of the technique I expected to need to use. I have a box trailer at work that needs adjustment too so I will try it on that first before I do it while standing on a ladder.

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    One thing to consider with the length of the rods is the clearance above the spring. The holes are 90 deg out, so you want to make sure you can rotate the rod high enough before hitting the ceiling to insert the next rod. A lot of times there is a 2-3" strut on the top of the door that limits the angle you can get the next rod in.

  24. #24
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    Quote Originally Posted by Grandslam99 View Post
    Even professionals in the Garage door trade have had incidents that have left them physically disabled or worse. There is a LOT of energy stored in the coils. I've found it to be money well spent for a professional house call!
    That happens because they rush, period. If you are doing your own, and that's all you are doing, you can take proper precautions to do it safely. Treat the rods as if you are ice climbing. Make sure you have the next rod secured before pulling out the previous rod. Keep your face and body out of the line of fire. The spring itself can't hurt you at all. Only the tool you use getting flung at you can hurt you. I've had it slip before and hit me in the collar bone, and have slipped and the rod hit my knuckle. Both times because I was rushing, because time is money and when you do 5 or 6 spring replacements in a day, you try to hurry. But like I said, doing only your own, with no need to rush, a competent person with the right amount of heads up can do it perfectly safe.

  25. #25
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    Re: Garage door insulation

    I used your technique on the trailer gate at work the other day. The first time I tried it I tightened it up too much. After loosening it up a bit, the spring now supports the trailer door the way it was supposed to.
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