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Mark...
01-18-2008, 03:55 AM
Okay, I'll start.

#1 Do not use a claw hammer to beat on metal.

#2 Do not hit a hammer with another hammer.

#3 Never hit the hardened end of any chisel or punch with a hammer.



Feel free to add any pet peeves that you may have:waving:

Mark...
01-18-2008, 07:06 PM
alright, either we got a bunch of chickens or nobody likes my thread :cry:

here's a couple more:

Always bend the tip of your tig filler over to avoid poking others or yourself in the eye.

Keep a fire extinguisher nearby at all times when welding or cutting.

Keep your work area clean.

daddy
01-18-2008, 10:23 PM
Mark, I've hit hammers with other hammers till my arm was sore and never had anything bad happen. I've heard the lore, but experience tells me otherwise.

zapster
01-18-2008, 10:26 PM
I have a pointy end of a chipping hammer in my left thigh from '79..
No kiddin'

Never hit hammers with hammers..:nono:

Never watch a weld with no mask..:nono:

Never leave your air compressor on all night..:nono:

...zap!

daddy
01-18-2008, 10:32 PM
Please elaborate Zap. I was seven in '79 and could certainly benefit from others experience.

ronbo
01-18-2008, 10:33 PM
Mythbusters did the hammer on hammer and could not get any negative results. I do remember a when I worked at Ingersoll Rand a guy striking non-hardened steel with a 3lb hammer. A piece of the softer steel broke off, went through the guys shirt and was embetted in his stomach. He had to have it removed at the hospitol. The doctor likened it to a gun shot wound.

zapster
01-18-2008, 10:47 PM
Please elaborate Zap. I was seven in '79 and could certainly benefit from others experience.


I was still "learning" at the time..

Was chipping slag off a 7018 weld I had just done..
The corner was giving me grief because I could not get the slag out..

Put the chisel side against a puddle I wanted "out"

Hit the pointy end with a ball peen..
Pointy end broke off and sunk in my thigh..

Never went to the hospital..

It's still in there..
Or disintergrated over time..

Just the "iron" I need everyday..:laugh:


Air compressors..

They will run all night if a air hose developes a leak big enough..
Or a fitting fails..

Then the compressor runs all night overheating..
Catching on fire..
And burning a shop down in the process..


Happened in Attleboro Mass to a shop in 1984...



...zap!

Burnit
01-19-2008, 12:06 AM
People have different opinions on this but, You should never wear gloves while operating a machine tool (mill, lathe, drillpress) yeah the gloves protect your hand from cuts that could easily be avoided, but the glove in also like a net around your hand. That glove gets caught on something that is moving it is probably gonna take your hand in for the ride. If you werent wearing a glove and something like a curly bit of chip from a drill grabs your hand its gonna cut you open but its better than getting your hand wrapped around the spindle.

It seems like when something goes wrong, the off switch/button/E stop is nowhere to be found

William McCormick Jr
01-19-2008, 12:20 AM
Mythbusters did the hammer on hammer and could not get any negative results. I do remember a when I worked at Ingersoll Rand a guy striking non-hardened steel with a 3lb hammer. A piece of the softer steel broke off, went through the guys shirt and was embetted in his stomach. He had to have it removed at the hospitol. The doctor likened it to a gun shot wound.


I am not so sure the Myth Busters are after the full truth. I believe they like to muddle around and give some clues. The problem is that they often give some the wrong ideas about the reality.

I believe if you find very old work hardened cracked rusted hammers they might give you the explosive fragment device you are looking for.

When I was a kid my father told me about trains and train accidents. He said that when he was a kid they used to put coins up on the tracks. And he had some flat liberty head coins that he put on the track.

I asked what if you put rocks on the track. And my father said that they would probably just shoot out, you would not want to be standing right there.

Well, my friend and I used to go to Lent services just to get out of school. I told the truant office that the note I had to go to Lent, was for the Luteran Lent services, that continued on after Easter. I said Lutherans were different. Ha-ha. They bought it or just felt bad for us. Ha-ha.

So my friend and I have nothing to do, so we go up to the elevated tracks. I had no pennies, so I said I am going to put some of these rusted gravel pieces on the rails and see what happens. The gravel gets rusty from the rails rusting and rain running off onto the gravel.

I figured since the time my father was a kid, they must have put a little wire brush scraper or a little miniature cattle plow to knock off little debris.

The train comes out of the station and to my surprise I don't see anything in front of the wheel. Now I am a bit nervous.

The train comes and hits the gravel. The wheels chatter on the tracks and pummel the gravel. A reddish rust cloud is created. The front wheels of the train levitate two feet off the track. And then remain levitated for about twenty five feet, two feet in the air. Then they just drop, and knock the ground out from under my feet. I almost soiled my shorts.

But I think what was overlooked here is the rust. Repulsion induction motors are supposed to be checked for rust, on the rotor and coil. If they are rusted they are supposed to be rewound and re-coated. Not many are aware of how important this is. And how it may save a rare accident from occurring. Years ago when you worked with motors, especially open motors you were taught to look for rust inside.

I have had fragments penetrate my skin many times from chisels and hardened punches and presses. It is dangerous.

Sincerely,


William McCormick

Mark...
01-19-2008, 12:32 AM
Oh and that brings me to another one

Do not use mushroomed tools. If it is a punch or chisel, keep the butt end dressed.

and for heavens sakes, at least have some safety glasses on.

OSHA makes you wear a face sheild over that.


BTW OSHA made an unannounced appearance at the jobsite first thing in the morning yesterday
the next thing I knew the general contractor was in my face telling me that was the osha lady right there and here I was cutting away with a 4 1/2" angle grinder with a 6"cutoff disc with no guard.

Ay, yay yay I got lucky I didn't get a huge fine that day. Me thinks osha lady sees um.. bulges

Burnit
01-19-2008, 12:38 AM
The front wheels of the train levitate two feet off the track. And then remain levitated for about twenty five feet, two feet in the air. Then they just drop, and knock the ground out from under my feet. I almost soiled my shorts.William McCormick

My F-250 goes 300 MPH and when I sneeze twenty dollar bills come out of my A$$, I figured out cold fusion in my basement with a McDonalds tray and an easy bake oven, if you tap on the side of my tool box with a 3/4 inch wrench you can see the future, If I TIG weld all day I can hear AM radio in my head, my cat knows where Osama Bin Laden is, The Milwauke Brewers will win the world series next year.

William McCormick Jr
01-19-2008, 12:54 AM
My F-250 goes 300 MPH and when I sneeze twenty dollar bills come out of my A$$, I figured out cold fusion in my basement with a McDonalds tray and an easy bake oven, if you tap on the side of my tool box with a 3/4 inch wrench you can see the future, If I TIG weld all day I can hear AM radio in my head, my cat knows where Osama Bin Laden is, The Milwauke Brewers will win the world series next year.


Give what I said some time to settle in. It is real.

Believe me I was far more surprised and wanted to reject it far more then you do. But I saw it happen, complete with the ground dropping effect.

At the time for sure I figured if I got caught my father would just shoot me.

The gravel was about 3/4" diameter across to the largest points. Most of it was even smaller. This may be something you have to see to believe.

Because I stood there rejecting the reality for some time. Then I just ran, and ran, until we saw the truant officer. Then I ran some more.

If the train driver came up to me today and said "Hey your that kid that levitated my train" I would still run some more.

Sincerely,


William McCormick

William McCormick Jr
01-19-2008, 01:01 AM
My F-250 goes 300 MPH and when I sneeze twenty dollar bills come out of my A$$, I figured out cold fusion in my basement with a McDonalds tray and an easy bake oven, if you tap on the side of my tool box with a 3/4 inch wrench you can see the future, If I TIG weld all day I can hear AM radio in my head, my cat knows where Osama Bin Laden is, The Milwauke Brewers will win the world series next year.


If Alan Fundt from Candid Camera, had walked up behind me laughing saying "Your on Candid Camera" I would have been the happiest guy in the world. You don't know the horror.

Sincerely,


William McCormick

Mark...
01-19-2008, 01:01 AM
you guys go ahead and rustle around with that and don't pay attention to what I am saying. Who knows OSHA's next stop may be your shop.

denrep
01-19-2008, 01:20 AM
you guys go ahead and rustle around with that and don't pay attention to what I am saying. Who knows OSHA's next stop may be your shop.

I just hope it's not the Union Pacific's next stop! :laugh:



The front wheels of the train levitate two feet off the track. And then remain levitated for about twenty five feet, two feet in the air. Then they just drop, and knock the ground out from under my feet. I almost soiled my shorts.


Bill, Don't tell me it was you, behind the Wreck of 'ol 97!! :laugh:

William McCormick Jr
01-19-2008, 02:02 AM
I just hope it's not the Union Pacific's next stop! :laugh:



Bill, Don't tell me it was you, behind the Wreck of 'ol 97!! :laugh:

I am telling you I should have written a book about my antics as a kid.

You really don't know the horror of standing there not knowing if the train is going to derail, come down the side of the embankment and kill you. All in a fraction of a second my life could have been over. From stupidity.

I had thoughts of never being aloud out again. Going to jail for it. It was bad. It created a localized earth quake. The ground actually left my feet. I was actually really scared by this. Because I would have bet a million dollars against it.

When I was a kid some people would tell you stuff about gasoline that was farfetched or just something they heard. And after all my testing it seemed like over all most of the stuff I had been told was exaggerated.

So here with something that my pop said would just shoot the rocks out. I see a very heavy stainless steel train flying through the air. It was like a little conspiracy. Ha-ha. The really bad stuff was not so bad, and the not so bad stuff was really bad.



Sincerely,


William McCormick

MJDamiani
01-19-2008, 02:25 AM
My F-250 goes 300 MPH and when I sneeze twenty dollar bills come out of my A$$, I figured out cold fusion in my basement with a McDonalds tray and an easy bake oven, if you tap on the side of my tool box with a 3/4 inch wrench you can see the future, If I TIG weld all day I can hear AM radio in my head, my cat knows where Osama Bin Laden is, The Milwauke Brewers will win the world series next year.

I agree. this is the biggest bullsh*t thread that I have ever read. Who cares if you hit hammers with hammers, your call. We are all here to learn and share welding knowledge. This thread needs to be removed. Why would any weldor respond to this guy?


MJD \ EOD

denrep
01-19-2008, 02:41 AM
this is the biggest bullsh*t thread that I have ever read.

Been away from the forum for awhile, huh? :laugh: :blob4:

Mark...
01-19-2008, 02:43 AM
Maybe we should start listening to YOU mr. MJDamiani

MJDamiani
01-19-2008, 03:11 AM
Been away from the forum for awhile, huh? :laugh: :blob4:

No...

I have logged out, and have been lurking for a long time. This forum is looking like kids talking on a CB radio. I have retired from two very prestigious careers and I just like to weld and fabricate things because I am very good at it. The kid's stuff on this forum is getting to be too much. In my opinion Zap is the best TIG weldor that I have seen. and there is much to be learned regarding the various specialties in welding. That is what I am here for, more knowledge and less bullsh*t.

MJD...retired EOD

LOGGING OUT UNTILL THE CURRENT Kid's stuff STOPS

MicroZone
01-19-2008, 03:19 AM
Amen MJD...well said.

Mark...
01-19-2008, 03:37 AM
If you think that hitting hammers is a joke or bullcake, you are entitled to your own opinion. But you can't say you didn't have fair warning.


But you could still add one or two of your own

spuddown
01-19-2008, 01:33 PM
I saw a guy try to pound a claw hammers claws under something he was trying to pry out and the hammer exploded. Shrapnel pretty much hit everyone within a twenty foot radius. Luckily no one was hurt more than a little sting. Also the train stayed on the track. Ive also hammered thousands of big pins moving drilling rigs and breaking down crane booms with a twenty pound sledge pounding on a smaller sledge or topping mall. It keeps from swelling the end of the pin. Sledges aren't as hard as claw hammers and I've never seen one chip because of it. I'm not saying its the right thing to do but it happens.

William McCormick Jr
01-19-2008, 02:22 PM
No...

I have logged out, and have been lurking for a long time. This forum is looking like kids talking on a CB radio. I have retired from two very prestigious careers and I just like to weld and fabricate things because I am very good at it. The kid's stuff on this forum is getting to be too much. In my opinion Zap is the best TIG weldor that I have seen. and there is much to be learned regarding the various specialties in welding. That is what I am here for, more knowledge and less bullsh*t.

MJD...retired EOD

LOGGING OUT UNTILL THE CURRENT Kid's stuff STOPS

I know this seems a bit "off track" pardon the pun, Ha-ha.

But there is actually a relationship between the two. Rust is often the culprit. And the fellow who mentioned a hammer being used as a wedge. Introduced an equally important basic phenomena.

When you subject a hammer to pressure especially in one direction more then another. The hammer is now exerting force against an object and has less force to maintain its own atomic structure.

When you strike the hammer under pressure it is now unable to maintain its atomic structure and can explode, especially if it is hardened. By striking it you can create a harmonic in the part. This vibration may cause the hammer to strike the part it is up against many thousands of times a second.

Just like mechanics know the power of a pneumatic hammer or impact guns, very high frequency, to loosen everything from nuts and bolts, tapper fits, to ball joints, sometimes unwanted.

We use this principle to fabricate things in a shop. Especially long pieces of steel or aluminum. Often we have no machinery to bend or straighten parts we have welded together. So we use a trick that really should not work, but does.

We have three guys put pressure on the part in the direction we want it to bend. The guys are unable to straighten the part with their own force. And when someone that has never seen this before watches they laugh at our attempt.

Then I just tap the part with a hammer and it almost magically bends into place. People who have never seen this before go out of their minds. Because they are so sure you cannot bend a large piece of steel or aluminum with a small hammer tap.

Most of the Aero Space industry used to be calculated on just such a phenomena taking place. Today I do not know.

The point to all this is that when you strike something you excite and separate the atoms in the object you strike. This gives an effect similar to heating the object.

Sincerely,


William McCormick

denrep
01-19-2008, 04:07 PM
... I see a very heavy stainless steel train flying through the air...


Stainless flying through the air?? You must have jumped the Burlington Zephyr!! :eek:

McCormick, I also had a childhood "entertainment center" at the railroad tracks. My safety tip is to stay away, it's dangerous there. I strongly discourage RR play.

There were some kids that used to do some impressive cold forging on the hobo punch press. In fact, so impressive that the Railroad sent some nice folks out to look into it! I really don't know how they ID'd anybody; 'cause I heard that the crew had dropped to the floor, bracing for a wreck! Anyway, in my study of rail/wheel stamping; a lot of eyebrows were raised, but I never heard of a wheel raising so much as a cat's hair! :)

Stay off the mainline! :nono:



I am telling you I should have written a book about my antics as a kid... ...The really bad stuff was not so bad, and the not so bad stuff was really bad....

If you write that book, I'll buy a copy. Plus, just for the record, you should really help the police to close out some of those unsolved mysteries! :laugh: :angel:

William McCormick Jr
01-19-2008, 04:08 PM
No...

This forum is looking like kids talking on a CB radio.
MJD...retired EOD

LOGGING OUT UNTILL THE CURRENT Kid's stuff STOPS

If you find a CB club with kids talking about this let me know. I would love to meet them.

This is real stuff. It used to be the first stuff you learned in the field of repulsion induction motors. And in carpentry, masonry, and metal work.

Incidentally the term repulsion induction is starting to fade away from the public eye.

It strikes me odd. Because it describes the function and the workings of the motors operation. Many people think that motors or magnets attract, they cannot. You can create an area short of repulsion or lacking repulsion but you cannot create attraction in our universe.

Rust can create an amazing amount of repulsion. I have no doubts.



Sincerely,


William McCormick

Mark...
01-19-2008, 07:00 PM
Look we are just trying to have kind of a little safety meeting here.
If you don't like safety meetings, well then, you know what you can do.

If you ever bothered to look at some of the stickers on new hammers you will see that it says **never strike a striking tool with another striking tool** or something similar.

If you want to take your chances don't say that I didn't try to stop you.

scott9116
01-19-2008, 09:09 PM
Back to shop safety. About a hundred years ago while in HS autoshop. The compressor was left on one night. We came back in the morning to find a drop hose with the connector beating the hell out of a nearly new Lincoln Bill Blass Edition Mark VII. This hose had been at it a while (8-10hrs?). Nearly every panel on the car was destroyed and all but one window. Hose split a couple inches above the fitting.

scott9116
01-20-2008, 07:41 PM
Anyone else have any interesting safety related stories?

infro
01-20-2008, 07:57 PM
don't weld overhead on your back with long hair ...... long story.....

DesertRider33
01-21-2008, 12:43 AM
Tie your locks up and put a rag on.

I use to put all kinda stuff on the tracks when I was a kid and never came close to derailing a freight train. We lived out in the woods outside of a small town and the train was not too far from our trailer house. Us kids played around the tracks all the time. I've hooked huge iron spikes around the track and all that happened was a lotta noise, sparks and then the thing went flying and you better not be around when it flew (the spike, not the train). You also better not still be around when the track police show up to find out what all the ruckus was about. They drove these cool little trucks that looked like overgrown golf carts on rails. I had no idea what a golf cart looked like at that time but that's how I would describe it now. Oh and most of the times we tried to put pennies on the track, they all vibrated off before the train ever got to them. The ones we taped on did get flattened nicely though.

One time we saw a pink and chrome train with a huge bright white light fly through the sky leaving a majestic starry trail behind like a comet. There were many nearly naked women with red velvet, lace and gold calling to us to jump aboard! A big fish swam around in our heads and beautiful mermaids with red lips shook their sequined tails as we watched in awe. Oh wait... did that happen or were we trippin? It's so hard to keep it all straight now....

Sandy
01-21-2008, 01:32 AM
Here's some 'don't do what I do' safety advice.

I like to work in the long tailed shirt/jackets. Bad thing. Especially with wire wheels and wire cups. Even worse with the drive motors with locking type switches.

No shirt tails or coat tails hanging out, at any time around any equipment big or small actually.

The polywhatever linings are also flamable as he11, even while grinding.

scott9116
01-21-2008, 03:26 PM
don't weld overhead on your back with long hair ...... long story.....

Wow, that's why I don't have long hair anymore. First time it was a flannel shirt, longhair and halogen worklight combo.

65535
02-06-2008, 02:56 AM
Watch where your grinding sparks are going, cotton can't stand the heat. (2" hole in one of my favorite shirts for not wearing a proper apron)