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View Full Version : Snowplow receiver repair. missing a few pics but I'll Post anyway



STwelder
11-24-2008, 12:51 AM
I suppose that's what it's called? Anyway I had a guy bring this to me wanting it fixed for half of what he said a shop wanted to repair it. Well I know a shop would have charged more than he said (150.00). But After looking at it and listening to the guy. I said I could do it for 75.00, but I couldn't guarantee anything at that price. The part that receives the plow/blade where the pin goes through it was ripped open on the top portion. And the bottom portion was broke off completely, about a 6" long by 2" wide from the hole the pin goes through back. It is just a piece of angle iron on the bottom.
Well I'll post the pictures ( the ones I have ) I guess I wasn't paying attention while taking pictures and didn't notice the memory stick was full and lost a couple pictures.

STwelder
11-24-2008, 01:01 AM
The first five pics are of the thing after wire brushing a little and finding a couple of cracks which I drilled the end of them with 1/8" drill bit. Then had to ask someone to leave till I was finished, and I would call them when I was done!

duaneb55
11-24-2008, 01:04 AM
Snow plows sure do take a beating. It must have snowed which means he needs it 'yesterday'.:dizzy: Couldn't have had it repaired two months ago or this spring when he took it off.:rolleyes:

STwelder
11-24-2008, 01:14 AM
As you can see one of the cracks had forked. And the other piece I don't know what it's called connects to the blade/plow as well some how, was thrown in as a free be ( with no pains to be taken with it ).

STwelder
11-24-2008, 01:24 AM
The piece of angle iron bracing I added at his request, but did not weld it solid as requested> I told him it had to be able to flex a little when he hit a curb or it would snap. He said this damage happened when he was backing off/over a curb. I don't know as I wasn't there.
True Duane it snowed mid week here last week, and it was falling off. The hole you see in the pictures of the cracks, is where he put a bolt with a round piece of steel, which rode against the little piece and stress cracked it ( the no pain piece ). I started to plate the cracked piece after welding, but decided he could bring it back if he hit something else and then charge he to fix it right. I think he learned that after telling me what he wanted to watch and learn? But I told him I usually don't let people watch when the item is theirs.

farmersamm
11-24-2008, 02:38 PM
If it gets him on the road again, that's good enough. If the guy doesn't want to pay the freight to get the thing redesigned, it's his worry.

Of course he'll still badmouth you if it fails again:(

STwelder
11-25-2008, 04:19 AM
Farmersamm you are probably right about the bad mouthing. But he probably wont use any names as he said he has a lot of work for me. When I have time to do it for him.He does mowing with a couple finish mowers, he said there are three tractors involved, a post hole driller and a couple other things he wants done. So we will see If he comes back or not. As he wants these done while the season isn't calling for them..... Like the snowplow I would guess.

lugweld
11-25-2008, 05:12 PM
Watch those cracked decks on the finishing mowers: drill a hole at the end of the crack. It is likely, you stil won't be sucessful because the metal has been contaminated in the cracks and in the metal at a microscopic level with silicone. Ditto that on any ground engaging piece of equipment.

farmersamm
11-25-2008, 07:40 PM
Watch those cracked decks on the finishing mowers: drill a hole at the end of the crack. It is likely, you stil won't be sucessful because the metal has been contaminated in the cracks and in the metal at a microscopic level with silicone. Ditto that on any ground engaging piece of equipment.

Gotta call ya on this one. Or, maybe I got lucky that particular day:)

This is a mouldboard off of a plow. These things are in real close contact with the soil.:D

My favorite rod for buildup/buildout is 7014. I use it on steel castings, and on what I definitely know to be something not made of mild steel. The cracks were filled in by dab-a-dab-a-doin' until the crack was filled in(piece of mild steel tacked on as a backer plate, later ground off). Then the material was built up to fill in the void caused by wear, and the missing part of the mouldboard. Grinding was just enough to knock down real rough edges. Finally I drilled a hole thru the built up area for the plow bolt. It was squared with a HAND FILE(that was fun:gunsfirin) to accept the square shouldered plow bolt(actually a hardened carriage bolt/stovebolt or whatever they call 'em)

Been a lot of yrs. and she's still throwin' dirt into furrows:drinkup:

Pic 1... The offending mouldboard
Pic 2... A zoom in on the cracked, worn paper thin, damage to the part. Sorry for the lousy quality, it's an old 35mm print.
Pic 3... The same part today, around 8yrs. later, and a lot of acres later.
Pic 4... A zoom in on the repair. Note rough appearance of built up area. Left it that way when first welded in order to trap dirt as it flowed over the mouldboard. Kind of like the way they hardsurface loader buckets.

lugweld
11-25-2008, 10:34 PM
Got lucky or your area doesn't have much sand. Ours does down here. Of course, a moldboad like that only lasts a week or two in the field anyway when you have a 2000 acres to plow, making fixing it a moot point.

farmersamm
11-26-2008, 12:36 AM
Gumbo, otherwise known as sandy loam with a pretty good of clay mixed in.

Wet, ya's azz sinks to China. Dry it's like concrete.

Mouldboards don't wear like bottoms(shears, or shares), bottoms get replaced about every 30-60 acres depending on how moist the soil is when ya get to plowin'.

At least around here anyhow.

duaneb55
11-26-2008, 12:44 AM
Gumbo, otherwise known as sandy loam with a pretty good of clay mixed in.

Actually, good gumbo contains generous portions of crawfish and shrimp. Judy makes killer chicken and sausage gumbo too!:D

farmersamm
11-26-2008, 12:51 AM
Actually, good gumbo contains generous portions of crawfish and shrimp. Judy makes killer chicken and sausage gumbo too!:D

Headin' out to the field as we speak. But I got a feeling it's gonna be a disappointment. Mouth full of mud instead of some good eats:D:drinkup:

Just got done with supper, now I'm droolin' again:cool2: Say hello to Judy

lugweld
11-26-2008, 12:53 AM
We have by definition from the dept of ag, sandly clay loam soils here In fact, we have Tift classification soils, the model soil for sandly clay loam, that all other defining sandly clay loams are judged by . It is not gumbo. Gumbo is a type of sticky clay that won't scrape off your shoes and holds water in a pond better than anything else. Sandy clay loam scours and wears anything it touches very rapidly.

The moldboards got replaced twice a year and the points and slides about twice a week, at least on the 6 bottom switch plows. Discs on harrows rarely last more than a year.

farmersamm
11-26-2008, 12:54 AM
Meanwhile, we've messed up ST's thread:blush:

duaneb55
11-26-2008, 12:58 AM
Meanwhile, we've messed up ST's thread:blush:

Yup, sure have. Sorry ST. BTW - nice repair job. I really have been following the thread.:drinkup:

STwelder
11-26-2008, 01:45 AM
Hay guys no problem, got two threads for the price of one haha.
And yes Lug I always drill cracks before welding. Didn't think much about the silica though... still don't if it's in there and grinding and the heat from the weld can't get past it, then there it will stay.
Gotta go look at the Forney welder I just got off Craigslist, wife picked it up while I was at work ( guy I bought it from loaded it for her ). Said it had a battery charger in it/with it /part of it? Gonna go look.

STwelder
11-26-2008, 01:51 AM
Farmersamm post some of that stuff you've been thinking nothing of.... if it's welded post it man. You have some interesting things you weld on. As most of us are not farmers we get to see those things through posting like this and no where else. As I'm not going to a farm for anything cept to get a couple bushels of corn and a few maters, and the pumpkin on ween.

Burnit
11-26-2008, 06:03 AM
It must have snowed which means he needs it 'yesterday'.:dizzy: Couldn't have had it repaired two months ago or this spring when he took it off.:rolleyes:

Are you hanging out at our shop Duane?

I swung by the shop today on the way to the jobsite and there were plows everywhere, I mean hey, thats great, making money! But when did these guys break them? That crazy snow storm we got in August? :D

ST, did the quote work out for ya? how long did ya spend on it if you don't mind my askin.

STwelder
11-27-2008, 02:50 AM
Burnit I spent 3 and 1/2 hrs on it. 5hrs was the actual time I had it. Ran out of wire and had to go get some from a friends garage about 1and1/2hrs away(round trip). My LWS Home Depot was out haha. As to the quote. My brother negotiated the deal thinking he was helping because the guy said a shop was wanting 150.00 to do it, that I would be glad to make the 75.00. Well he had good intentions. But we talked about pricing and work he sent my way. Which I took the job on because it was interesting to me mostly.