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View Full Version : lookin for info on career in mechanics



fishon91
05-26-2009, 01:46 PM
hi all, i'm 17 just graduated my junior year in highschool, i'm just brainstorming A LOT about different careers. i'm wondering how everyone here likes what they do, and just tryin to find out as much as i can about it(different jobs as a mechanic, yearly average salary, difficulty, whatever...) also maybe different school in louisiana. my plans were to be a game warden or biologist, but i just don't know. i DO NOT want to be always looking for a better job, and i wanna be happy, and i NEVER wanna have to be forced to moved, or be away from family.
i wasn't sure where to ask a question like this, but i know i'll be able to get some great anwsers from yall, this froum is awesome.

Billdacat
05-26-2009, 07:12 PM
If you are not headed to college; join the military and serve your country…I put six years in the Navy and learned enough to put me on a path to a very lucrative career. I always had a roof over my head, food on the table, and wife and kids taken care of…Besides that; happy as a clam. :cool2:

steve45
05-26-2009, 10:10 PM
Game warden, biologist, mechanic, that's a pretty good range. What exactly are you interested in? Are you mechanically inclined? How are your grades? What do you like to do for fun?

Keep in mind that most people never end up doing what they plan to do.

One thing you said really stands out: you don't want to move. The best advice I ever got was from my English teacher my senior year in high school. He said to go as far away from home as you can. You can always come back, but you won't know what's out there if you don't go have a look.

When you get out of you comfort zone, you grow.

Magnetic Mechanic
05-27-2009, 01:35 AM
GO TO SCHOOL.

But if you absolutely can't do that then I'm with Billdacat.
Navy Machinery repairman At 18. got out and Worked as machinist, glass cutter, construction, mechanic (plant and fleet), maintenance foreman, maintenance manager, Director of maintenance and Plant manager.

Never went to college. Lived in 3 states. Burned out at 58 and retired on disability.
Had I an education, I would have made the big bucks.

fishon91
05-27-2009, 11:03 PM
i dont think i said i wasn't planning on college, i do. i'm on roll right now for TOPS (louisiana's biggest scholarship program), gpa about a 2.3-2.7. learning something i don't know interests me, as long as it something realistic, meaning not english, or something like nano cells or whatever, that's just too small, i like stuff that is you know realistic......
i was born in mid florida, and now live in central LA, my dad was raised in alaska, i love FL and like LA i do not, known for a fact, want to move to any other state. i love being in the woods, and watching and interacting with wildlife, but mechanics really holds an interest to me. i like it all, i'm just not sure what i want to do for the rest of my life. of course, it's not like i'm tryin to make a decision this year, just brainstorming.

steve45
05-28-2009, 08:22 AM
You apparently suffer from the same malady as other people your age: you communicate by texting. Your spelling, punctuation, and grammar are atrocious. If you expect to hold any higher level position, you need to learn to communicate effectively.

I hated English, too. In my working life, I've worked as an engineer, pilot, salesman, etc. I've written countless training manuals, 'how-to' articles, etc.; clear communications skills are absolutely essential.

I guess you're right, Florida & Louisiana are the only states that have woods and wildlife.:jester:

Seriously, when I went back to my 20th high school reunion, I was amazed at how many people had not left the area. You could really tell a difference: those that moved away seemed a lot more mature & knowledgeable; those that stayed acted like they always did. The world is a BIG place, go see it!

Frank Chloupek
06-02-2009, 09:07 AM
One of the best ways to do some brainstorming is to try to do as many different kinds of summer jobs, internships, etc. as you can. That gives you a chance to try out the field in practice and see if it's interesting. Also if you do go to colloege, look at places you can get involved as an undergraduate, a lot of professors will have opportunities for an undergraduate to spend a few hours a week on something. You might have to *push* to find something, but the opportunities are there. Summer break is a good chance to get a deeper dive too.

Also the fewer "limits" you put on yourself the better. For example, if you want to work for the Forest service and you have to be in Florida or Louisiana, well that really limits you if you can't go to a place like Yosemite. Especially early in your life, when you have fewer things tying you down that's a better way to explore.

65535
06-03-2009, 02:58 AM
You apparently suffer from the same malady as other people your age: you communicate by texting. Your spelling, punctuation, and grammar are atrocious. If you expect to hold any higher level position, you need to learn to communicate effectively.

I hated English, too. In my working life, I've worked as an engineer, pilot, salesman, etc. I've written countless training manuals, 'how-to' articles, etc.; clear communications skills are absolutely essential.

I guess you're right, Florida & Louisiana are the only states that have woods and wildlife.:jester:

Seriously, when I went back to my 20th high school reunion, I was amazed at how many people had not left the area. You could really tell a difference: those that moved away seemed a lot more mature & knowledgeable; those that stayed acted like they always did. The world is a BIG place, go see it!

That is some seriously excellent advice. Me being only 19, I can't offer too much great advice. Your GPA is a bit low for any scholarship I've ever heard of.

There is lot's of good experience waiting to be had in the military. Like others have said you really do need to try stuff out.

Me personally I do a lot of handy man stuff. I can do most stuff around a house or factory that needs doing. It's fun and all, but it's not really something I see myself sinking into and doing for the rest of my life. Not to say it's beneath me but I need a bit more of a mental challenge, more associated with design and theory than just the building. Don't get me wrong you learn more making than anything else. I need it both the theory and design, as well as the hands on stuff.

So find what's best for you. Don't rely on anything if you can help it.

:dizzy::dizzy::dizzy:

bigwhitebeast
06-05-2009, 03:12 AM
My father was an auto mechanic turned police officer, my brother was an auto mechanic turned truck driver. Me, I've learned enough from the two of them to do my own wrenching including transmission and engine rebuilds. In high school I went to a vocational school for machine trades but after 2 years of school I decided I didn't really want to stand in front of a lathe all day.

So I went in the Navy and learned about gas turbines and electrical control circuits, when I got out of the Navy I tripled my pay the first year working at a power plant as a control room operator. I have moved around working at 6 different power plants for 4 different companies in two different states but the moves were my own decision. Since getting out of the Navy and completing my first full year at a power Plant I have tripled my income again since 1992. I only have a few college class and make more than most of my friends that have 4 year degrees. Heck my wife has a 4 year degree and stays at home with the kids, thats the gig I want:cry:

I work quite a few hours a year but I love what I do, there is something about being in control of a machine that drinks 18,000 gallons an hour of diesel fuel and we have three of them. These guys are right too, you'll need to work on presentation if you ever want to go far at all and have respect from those around you. Find something you love to do day in and day out. Don't limit yourself to your home town, I started at a plant 100 miles from home, then moved within 10 miles and then moved 400 miles away, now I work 50 miles from home but I have bought a house 1 mile from where I grew up. By moving I made huge opportunities for myself and learned more than I ever thought I would. Had I stayed at the plant 10 miles from home I be making half of what I am and I would probably be as bored as could be without much for useful credentials.

roco
06-11-2009, 05:28 AM
im a mechanic, my dads a mechanic, and my grandfather was a mechanic. my dad told me before i left school, don't do what i do, you will always be dirty, you wont get rich, and cars will dive you insane. i went to collage on my own funds to do mechanical engineering did two years and decided it wasn't for me, ive dabbled in most trades over the years and tried to keep mechanics and cars as a hobby, but i always came back to it. i started racing on a basic level, cheep motor sport, and i built my own cars from scratch, then people started asking me to fix theres, and build there cars, and now i have my own company for the last 2 1/2 years building race cars rally cars and track cars, im happy, ill never get rich, but i get to choose my jobs, do them my way, express myself in my work.

what im trying to get across is, i didn't want to be a mechanic, i wanted to do so many things, but only found out what i wanted to do by trying lots of other jobs and eventually through experience decided what i wanted to do, if you really have a interest in motor vehicles or mechanics, id advise doing motor sport technology, or motor sport engineering as most people would agree its a bit more interesting and has good careerer paths. hope all goes well for you,

Mad about Metal
06-22-2010, 09:23 AM
G'day mate..

I'm a mechanic/welder and love it!!! I dropped outta high school and went into a few things, ended up going to trade school and found I was brilliant with cars and engines, and I know I may never get rich but as my wife and I say money will never make you truely happy in life...

Do a few different jobs and find something you love and stick with what you love

gwiley
06-22-2010, 11:26 AM
Keep your mind open. Most folks in professional positions in the IT industry are not doing what they went to school for and I suspect that other industries are similar. I have had programmers working for me that have English degrees, Mechanical Engineering degrees, etc.

The key is to find the kind of work that you can show up for day after day without wanting to kill somebody. Bear in mind that most things that are a job become unpleasant over time, especially when HAVE to do it rather than doing what you want.

Don't make the decision based on what you like as a hobby - it will end up ruining your hobby. Keep hobby and "job" separate. After 25 years working with computers you can't pay me enough to deal with them once I get home from work.

smokin_dodge
06-22-2010, 02:41 PM
i couldnt agree more with whats been said - your very young and dont have to start a career tomorrow - im 25 and just finishing school and im still not certain what i want to do, but having any college degree will get you alot farther than no college degree, whether its a full bachelors degree or just an associates. when it comes to job applicants because i have a degree i get looked at before the guys that dont have college degree's because im looking to go into a managerial position.

go find some local shops and ask if you can sweep the floors, learn how the business is run and if its not for you then its not for you. i worked for a small software company (i put computers together) for 18 months before i decided i wanted to go back to school so i could make more money. i was stuck at $12 an hour @20yrs old and was told without a degree i wasnt going to make any more money until i got some years under my belt.

now im 1 class away from graduation and have a few offers in the low 40k's. and all that is because of the wide variety of jobs i have had. ive built computers, worked on school computers, been a maintnence man, been a groundskeeper, worked for my redneck buddy building fences and cattleguards, and worked in the school mechanics shop fixing peoples cars and rebuilding trailers.

im still clueless as to what i want to do professionally but i have a few jobs under my belt, and i dont mean i worked a week and then quit, i put in 8-9 months at each job and got the experience to get me where i am today.

your on the right track so dont give up. and 65535 is right, your GPA is way too low for full scholarships at a state university, my girlfriend has a 3.4 and only gets $500 a semester from 4H - if she had a higher gpa she would get more money...i have a 2.1 and have paid up front every semester for school, but i worked my way through college by doing manual labor jobs as ive said above.

moneymaker17
06-30-2010, 10:16 AM
just like what someone was saying they went to a vo tech school in highschool tryed it out.
it SUCKS!!!! theres not enough pay in the job to do what you do.
its hard work man!
have you thought about heating and ac? its big right now. people want ac bad! they will pay alot of money for it too!
or welding?
get into the union

BlauSchuh
06-30-2010, 09:18 PM
I would look into the Navy, possibly get qualified on a nuke sub. Plenty of time to explore your options.

You don't sound like you have the mentality or grades to crack the books and go to school to become an engineer or scientist, so I wouldn't go that route. However, if you go the military route you will have some cash for school available if ultimately you decide that's what you want to do. It's possible that a couple of years in the military will narrow your focus and interests a bit.

Ask yourself where the jobs are going to be in 10 years. I personally believe that at some point we're going to start building Nuke power plants, and with hardly anyone going into that field in the last decade.. you could probably write your own ticket with a military background and knowledge of nukes

Rbeckett
07-01-2010, 07:16 AM
Fishon 91 and Blau, I have been a mechanic for 30+ years and I have come to the following observations. I never intended to be a mechanic, I didn't like all the grease, dirt, heat and heavy work, but It fed two families and raised two sets of kids, You wont get rich as a mechanic, but it will take you a long long way if you let it. Learn as much as you can, and keep an open mind, things will happen for you. While I was raising those families I managed to keep the lights on, have a decent way to and from work, and pay the bills, but I didnt get rich. Learn a trade that people need, and apply yourself by doing a good job, people look for that and will seek you out. I have a "following" in the automotive business that come to where I am because they know I will take care of their stuff and do a good job, no matter what. Because I applied myself I stayed busy when others werent, again I didnt get rich, but the repo never came out either. You CAN do whatever you want, the sky is truly the limit, dream big and your life will be full of great things.

BlauSchuh
07-01-2010, 10:54 PM
Fishon 91 and Blau, I have been a mechanic for 30+ years and I have come to the following observations. I never intended to be a mechanic, I didn't like all the grease, dirt, heat and heavy work, but It fed two families and raised two sets of kids, You wont get rich as a mechanic, but it will take you a long long way if you let it. Learn as much as you can, and keep an open mind, things will happen for you. While I was raising those families I managed to keep the lights on, have a decent way to and from work, and pay the bills, but I didnt get rich. Learn a trade that people need, and apply yourself by doing a good job, people look for that and will seek you out. I have a "following" in the automotive business that come to where I am because they know I will take care of their stuff and do a good job, no matter what. Because I applied myself I stayed busy when others werent, again I didnt get rich, but the repo never came out either. You CAN do whatever you want, the sky is truly the limit, dream big and your life will be full of great things.

My grandfather stepped off the boat and started a service station in the early 40's, complete with outside lift, brrrrr. guy was one determined bugger. by the mid 40s he had built his own 5 bay service station and had an established business. My father took over in the 80's and still runs/owns it today. I know enough about cars to be dangerous. Unfortunately (some would say fortunately), I went in a different direction and work in a an unrelated field.. Wish I had the balls to say "F---- it , I'm going to take over the business" and kiss my present occupation goodbye, but I may too much $$$ to separate myself from it.

durallymax
07-03-2010, 10:57 PM
MOVE AWAY. Go as far away from home as possible, learn new things meet new people. You will learn that the friends you have now probably wont be your best friends down the road, you will go to school and meet your best friends because they share more of the same interests as you.

School is 10% about learning and getting a piece of paper that says you passed. The other 90% is having fun, experiencing new things, doing things you regret, learning from all of your mistakes, and going wild while you can and getting that out of your system so when you graduate you can move on with your life and settle down some.

Being a Mechanic is OK. But its for those who really like it. Diesel and Aviation Mechanics get payed the best, and are in the highest demand. But its grueling work, and hard on your body. Not to mention tools are very expensive. But if you want to do it you can.

I was on the fast track to becoming a Diesel mechanic until I started doing it all day every day and realized it just wasnt what I wanted to do all day.

Go to school for a lot of things that interest you. Theres no price for knowledge, worry about paying for it later. Have a good time at school, its something you will never regret.

homeless
07-11-2010, 04:04 PM
Fishon,

There is a lot of good advice in here, but all of it is worthless.

What you need to do is sit down and think about what you are passionate about? What are your goals and dreams? What is a career and skill set that you can devote yourself to? Don't listen to anyone else, they will always speak from their goals and dreams, from their experiences and what they wish they would have done. This is about you.

If you can find work that you care about, you will always get up and be happy you GET to go to work. You will want to perfect your skills and strive to achieve more. That attitude is infections and will invade the rest of your life. I love what I do, even when I don't make the best money. I am really good at what I do, but I am far from the best, and I am certainly not perfect. Every day at work I hone my skills, at night I read and do research so that I can get better. My love of work has given me drive and motivation in my life, that same drive is why I go ride my bike and work out every day.

For the last few years I couldn't have been happier with my life. I have been doing what I love, getting up early and working late was so worth it, because I enjoyed every minute at work. Because of that positive mental attitude I have met a great woman, that is now a reason for me to come home at night, instead of doing long nights. I still like to work late, but it is so nice to slide into bed next to her.

Don't think about the money, if you are passionate about your job and always looking to improve, then the money will come. Don't think about status, if you drive yourself and get good enough you will have it. Don't think about a right now job, those are what you do at night to help pay for your tools and equipment.

Go for broke man, go for happiness.

Ohh and read Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged.