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malich
11-29-2005, 10:56 PM
Ok, here is a good one for you.

I have a Lincoln Pro Mig 175 Welder and everytime I hook up to house current I can never get a clean stable arc. When I hook up to my generator I get a beautiful clean stable arc.

Has anyone else had this problem or know how to fix it? I am plugging my welder into my dryer outlet which I made a heavy duty cable for.

Someone told me I need a dedicated ground for the welder. What does that mean and how do I hook one up off my fuse box if that is the case?!?!?

Thanks!
Mike

Sandy
11-30-2005, 01:29 AM
I have a Lincoln Pro Mig 175 Welder and everytime I hook up to house current I can never get a clean stable arc. When I hook up to my generator I get a beautiful clean stable arc.

Have you done a comparison measurement of the house voltage vs the gen set voltage?? Maybe the house is running a little lower. Wild shot.


Someone told me I need a dedicated ground for the welder. What does that mean and how do I hook one up off my fuse box if that is the case?!?!?

Well that's sorta true and sorta not. A 120 circuit runs on one hot lead (normally black), through the appliance, motor, welder or whatever and out on what's called neutral (white wire). Please excuse the shortened version.:) A 230/240 runs off or across the two 120's (normally a black and a red) and there is a ground present(normally bare) for safety reasons and a couple other teeny ones we don't need to worry about right now.

Supposedly the white neutral wires and bare grounds are all tied together at the main disconnect. So while using two hots and a neutral vs two hots and a ground might not be technically correct or meet codes, operationally there isn't much difference for the purposes of this discussion. Only in a safety sense.

Because dryers often operate both at 120 volts and 230/240 volts modern installations have 4 wires==two hots, one neutral and a ground. Older ones only used three wires==two hots and a common neutral/ground.

Check all connections, breakers included, to see visually they are solid with no loose lugs etc., and maybe measure from one leg to ground and the other leg to ground to see they are both balanced. Things like that. Could be there is a loose connection that won't pack current well. Do that through your adapter so it gets tested.

If you didn't install the original dryer run yourself you just don't know what kind of job was done on it really.

malich
11-30-2005, 08:18 PM
Hi Sandy,

Ok, I called Lincoln today and they were not of much help. I got the story about how thw welder only requires 220V and that's all it needs. I explained to him the story about the welder and he had no clue and said it should not make a difference.

So much for Lincoln. My gen. has a 30 AMP circuit and my arc is stable and clean. I think I will go to Home Depot and ask some in the electricial department and see if they know.

Thanks for your help!!

Mike

tapwelder
11-30-2005, 11:45 PM
I had this problem with a 110 welder. I ran excellent off a generator at 30 amps, however sputtered and ran inconsistently off my home outlet. I installed a 25 amp breaker with a 25 amp outlet , this fixed the problem.

I also have a Panasonic Gunslinger 260. According to the operators manual at 260 amp output the input amps must be 65 amps. While I never use 260amps this might give you an idea what type current your wiring should be able to handle. Check your breaker rating and wire gauge. Make sure your breaker is functioning properly, because my dryer will still function with one breaker tripped. Be careful.

Just a thought, since wire speed controls the current when welding, then why not plug welder in, turn wire speed up to max, measure in length how much comes out for 15 seconds multiply by 4. Compare the product (answer) to the max rated inches per minute. While the numbers might not be exact if they are halfed then you probably have an input current problem. Rated inch per minute can be found in your operators manual or over the internet.

Mr_Fixit
12-03-2005, 11:26 PM
Did you hook it up correctly? Maybe you're running 110 to it instead of 220? Is it hooked up 2 two hot leads? I'd say you have either hooked it up incorrectly or you have a problem with your dryer wiring, maybe the circuit breaker, or one of the hot leads coming to the house. Start with a volt meter. If you don't know what to do with it then find someone who is an electricain.

caosesvida
12-05-2005, 10:11 AM
sounds like a wiring problem, you could have some loose connections or line loss from undersized wire.

Beckman_Welding
12-07-2005, 06:10 PM
Make sure your breaker is functioning properly, because my dryer will still function with one breaker tripped.:nono:


so your saying that your breaker for your dryer is 2 single poles and not one double pole? now that is dangerous.