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DSW
09-12-2014, 10:30 PM
Ok It's been suggested we have a thread for links to blacksmithing and forging projects, how to and so on. Lets keep this simple. Lets try and keep this thread for descriptions and links to threads on the subject. If you have a suggestion, post up the link to the thread along with some sort of brief description of the thread so people reading this can see if it might have what they are looking for.

If you have questions or comments on a thread listed, please post them in the appropriate thread, not here, or start a new thread on the subject. That way guys don't have to wade thru pages of BSing questions and answers best dealt with some where else and so on. Extraneous posts will be deleted or moved at our discretion.


For now I'll leave this here in projects for a couple of reasons, #1 the Mig/tig/ OA section has a ton of stickys already and we really don't need any more there. Here there's only a few. #2 most of the threads linked will most likely be projects of some sort anyways. A forge build, gate or fence project etc. For now I'll sticky this and if it gets a fair amount of support with guys looking back at older threads they remember or come across and add them, we can see how things go.

DSW
09-12-2014, 10:32 PM
I'll do the 1st post as a link to my coal forge build thread ...

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?146321-Coal-forge

The thread shows step by step how I constructed my coal forge from scratch and it's evolution over time.

DSW
09-12-2014, 10:36 PM
My thread on assorted blacksmithing and forging tools.

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?422791-Blacksmithing-tools&p=4531301

shortfuse
09-12-2014, 11:00 PM
Good idea to start a sticky on blacksmithing and forging.

I got started blacksmithing when I needed to bend some heavy bar stock for a welding project....got hooked on blacksmithing from then on. Seems a lot of welders would have a need to move heavy metal and don't necessarily need to go full blast into blacksmithing. Most blacksmiths hang out on iforgeiron.com and a few welders show up there as well...sorta cross-pollinating if you will.

Your threads are VERY good at helping folks getting started in blacksmithing and condense that info into a easy to read format. Looking forward to lots of input on the sticky!!

Dantheharleyman99
09-13-2014, 12:07 AM
http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?421761-Back-to-the-basics!&highlight=Back+to+the+basics

This is the link to the forge build that I started a few months ago! Lots of good info about designing one and tons of ideas and knowledge from some of the other smiths on ww. I used some ideas from DSW and his forge build. And had to change some of my own designs with their help that saved me some aggravation in the long run!
Anyway... enjoy!

DSW
09-13-2014, 11:12 AM
A thread on discussing forge fuels.


http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?433771-Forge-fuels

Dantheharleyman99
09-15-2014, 12:46 PM
Here is a link to my new thread, I built a stand for my post vise.. Not done yet but I've got a good start!
http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?434311-Post-vise-and-stand

Dantheharleyman99
09-16-2014, 10:39 PM
Here is a link I got from one of the other guys for black smithing books. It's a site that has a few different books on smithing, shop set up, techniques, tools.... Even the differences in anvils and the materials, processes, and quality that make them desirable or undesirable. Also has info on proper heating techniques, tempering, and hardening.

Very interesting info!
http://www.craftsmanspace.com/free-books/blacksmithing-books.html

shortfuse
09-16-2014, 10:49 PM
You're right...very interesting info. I like reading some of the OLD publications and trying the methods they used then, like the late 1800's.

Thanks for posting the link.

DSW
09-16-2014, 11:08 PM
That same link was posted here in 2011 by Gizardgutz

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?56040-Free-Blacksmithing-amp-Forging-Books

DSW
09-16-2014, 11:15 PM
I came across this thread looking for the book link above. It has a bunch of links that I'll copy below so all the links are here in one places, as well as copies of a few PM's I sent to members who asked questions on blacksmithing that might be of help to some.

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?209141-Forge-welding-blacksmithing


My propane forge build thread. It still needs some more work and I'll update it eventually when I get back to it at some point..
http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?t=64084


Recent thread Brian did on doing a forge demo for the kids.
http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?t=193481

Bhardy has two recently, his forge build thread and the one where he just fired it up.
http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?t=195701
http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?t=208711

Steve ( 7A749) and Weldbead have one and I know several others do as well.

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?t=169881
http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?t=89181

One of my local colleges had a blacksmithing class over the summer that I took.

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?t=141121


Iforgeiron is a good site for blacksmithing questions, so is Anvilfire and the ABANA site.

http://www.iforgeiron.com/
http://www.anvilfire.com/
http://www.abana.org/resources/education/schools.shtml

DSW
09-16-2014, 11:40 PM
Thread listing just a few blacksmithing organizations here in the US and in Oz and the UK...

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?434811-Blacksmithing-groups-or-locations&p=4686121#post4686121

shortfuse
09-17-2014, 03:17 PM
DSW, great list...thanks for posting! Lots of reading there.

DSW
09-19-2014, 09:42 PM
I located this link to some other free downloadable old books on various crafts and blacksmithing/metal work

http://www.hlcollege.ac.uk/Downloads/craftpublications.html


http://www.artisanideas.com/category/47/Free-PDF-Books.html



A Manual of Practical Instruction in the Art of Brass Repoussé for Amateurs
http://books.google.com/books?id=DOc3AAAAMAAJ&printsec=titlepage&dq=repousse#v=onepage&q=repousse&f=false

DSW
09-19-2014, 10:45 PM
Youtube videos on blacksmithing and forging

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?435891-Blacksmithing-and-forging-videos&p=4699451#post4699451

app-ironworksllc
09-25-2014, 11:00 PM
Pretty awesome thread, Doug. I haven't been around much lately been awful busy between work and family, plus I got suckered into to taking a job at our local tech school teaching blacksmithing 101. I just started my 3rd session. Classes are every Friday from 6 to 10 pm, man I'm bushed by the time class is over.

DSW
09-25-2014, 11:20 PM
There seemed to be a fair amount of interest with many here, so I figured we'd try this out and see if it develops into a dedicated section of it's own like some would like. That's cool that things are going well for you. I figured you were swamped Brian, since you hadn't chimed in yet. Your forged stuff is always great.

Kind of neat they let you teach blacksmithing at the tech school. Be sure and post up some picts of what your class accomplishes in a thread. I'm sure everyone would love to see them.

DSW
09-28-2014, 11:04 PM
Thorshammers coal forge build and picts of a few other forges of members here.

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?292331-Brake-drum-forge-build-question

whtbaron
09-28-2014, 11:37 PM
Lots of interesting ideas here...thanx.

DSW
09-28-2014, 11:43 PM
Might as well add Whtbaron's forge to the list.

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?437971-Coal-forge


Mudmans "makeshift" anvil and other info on anvils.

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?437471-Makeshift-anvil-ideal-approach

crab fisherman
09-30-2014, 09:14 PM
I really like the direction this thread is headed. Always cool to see the creative solutions those that share their pictures (I have nothing to contribute...!..) have come up with!

Mikael
10-10-2014, 02:51 AM
Great list. Thanks to all for these posting.

app-ironworksllc
12-13-2014, 08:20 PM
Did this little lawnmower blade while helping the students on their final projects for this semester's last class.

936601

936621

DSW
02-20-2015, 09:31 PM
BigB's free 55 gallon forge and a lot of good info on places to buy tooling and ideas on how to put together a smithy on a small budget...


http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?486231-Bigb-s-Blacksmithing-on-a-scrap-budget

bigb
03-01-2015, 09:15 PM
Tried the coal today and WOW what a difference! Got that #8 rebar glowing yellow/orange and the 16 gauge got soft as butter! It was HOT. I can see this forge work will be better in the winter, I could barely stand within 6-8 feet of it when it was roaring. Tried to put up a video but no luck.

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e184/bossmonkie/2015-03-01%2017.13.57_zpsshym8dz5.jpg (http://s39.photobucket.com/user/bossmonkie/media/2015-03-01%2017.13.57_zpsshym8dz5.jpg.html)

DSW
04-04-2015, 03:47 PM
I'll add the link to Steve's forge station.

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?169881-Forge-Station-Cart-W-Modular-Attachments

DSW
04-23-2015, 11:16 PM
ARhillbilly's forge.

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?508901-New-forge

DSW
05-31-2015, 10:59 AM
Wroughtn_harv's propane forge build.

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?518931-Made-not-bought-propane-forge

DSW
06-06-2015, 05:31 PM
I'll add the link to my latest small blacksmithing projects.

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?520501-A-little-forgery

Double Y
06-29-2015, 10:08 AM
I do a lot of blacksmithing with my iron art work. I was commissioned to make these shelf brackets.

The main straps are 1 1/2 x 1/4 and the support curves are 1 x 1/4. The main straps are 14 inches long on each leg. I forge broke the edges and forged the curve for each. I drilled the holes, no points for punching the holes. I blind plug welded the rivets and then hot textured them.

The whole works was hot waxed and then burnished with a rag.
11502111150221115023111502411150251

7A749
06-29-2015, 10:09 AM
Nice!

schartzross
06-30-2015, 11:19 PM
Been lurking on this sticky since it started, anyways came across 2 Kirby vacuum blowers for sale would like to pass them on if anyone's interested or if they are of value I may just pick them up any info or interest is appreciated.

DSW
08-02-2015, 11:35 PM
Thread on anvils and stands.

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?38384-Anvil-amp-stand

Stumps and tie downs.

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?39158-Anvil-tiedown-what-works-well

whtbaron
08-03-2015, 12:14 AM
Missed that one when I was searching old anvil links... some interesting tools and hold downs. Thanks for the link.

DSW
08-03-2015, 01:08 AM
Feel free anyone to post links to any other smithing related threads I may have missed. I don't have to be the only one to add links to this thread. I'm sure there are a ton of other ones, either smithing projects you or others have done, or anvil/blacksmithing tool related threads on here I haven't dug up yet. Every so often I stumble upon another one and try to add it. I'd like to make this as comprehensive as possible since the search function on this site sucks big time.

ManoKai
08-15-2015, 02:52 PM
Impressive double-wide Railroad Rail Anvil. Nice welding pointers and descriptions from the fabricator.

Part 1 (of 4)....

www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MYfioSO_c4

DSW
08-17-2015, 09:59 AM
This thread on roses/flowers should probably be added to this list.

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?158281-Handmade-Rose&highlight=

DSW
08-17-2015, 10:00 AM
rahtreelimbs railroad track anvil thread.



http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?536521-Anvil-Finally-Done-!!!

whtbaron
08-17-2015, 10:24 AM
More railroad track anvils.....http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?161251-RR-Track-Anvil&highlight=rail+road+track+anvil

tanglediver
08-23-2015, 07:26 PM
How DO they put faces on anvils? :confused:

Here's one example.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eA_Pw5mlf2U

DSW
08-25-2015, 12:38 AM
I'll add the link to the thread I just started on forged bottle openers.

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?538791-Forged-bottle-openers

DSW
08-25-2015, 10:13 PM
Norin_rad's forged grilling fork and chipping hammer.

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?538821-Forged-Grilling-Fork-and-a-Chipping-Hammer

ThorsHammer
09-08-2015, 01:38 PM
here's my first "for regular use" forging project. but in reality most was welded. only the "dogs" were forged. For having 0 real training I'd say it didn't turn out to bad. Just needs to be functional right?

1207241

24" Deep x 36" wide. Final height is yet to be determined, as the fire place it is going into doesn't exactly have a level floor. Made with 3/8"x2" flat stock.

tanglediver
09-13-2015, 11:26 PM
Happy Anniversary to the thread! :D

So, we can scratch tungsten-carbide off the materials list...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cytuz142KJs

whtbaron
09-20-2015, 11:54 AM
Interesting... my first approach would have been to reshape the grinding tip on the grinder. Apparently breathing any grinding dust from that process would not be a good thing.

ManoKai
10-14-2015, 04:36 AM
DIY Propane Forge (https://sites.google.com/site/ejuribe/forge), powered via a Hybrid JetBurner Torch (www.hybridburners.com/index.html). The tech literature on the T-Rex style Mach burners looks very hot.

Lis2323
10-14-2015, 11:07 AM
Here's the Peter Wright anvil I acquired this summer. Finally got around to finding a block of oak to mount it. The stump is tapered on the bottom so that I can pick it up with my forks.

The rivets in the band are just for decor.

BD1
10-14-2015, 12:12 PM
Lis2323, nice ! :cool2: I like the taper to use that mechanical stuff to lift where you only need one finger to move it, :D :drinkup:

Great hold down setup too !

shortfuse
10-14-2015, 08:42 PM
Great looking anvil...looks to be in fine shape. You'll really enjoy using it.

whtbaron
11-01-2015, 11:08 PM
Blacksmith tools thread...
http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?422791-Blacksmithing-tools&highlight=green+anvil

whtbaron
11-01-2015, 11:22 PM
The green anvil thread...
http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?422771-Police-officer-came-to-my-shop-today&highlight=green+anvil

bigb
11-10-2015, 12:30 AM
I finally got a real anvil which I will take pics of and post, and I am getting the outdoor smithing shop set up now that summer is finally over and it is possible to work outside. One idea I have for this thread is a list of metals people use for forging. Every Saturday I go to the local scrap yard where they sell scrap for 40 cents per pound. I am interested in finding hardened steel to make tools, hardies etc. I already know to look for leaf and coil springs but what are some good things to look for, both high carbon and mild? I am also curious about the composition of automotive axles, are they high carbon? Just looking for ideas on what other people use for projects. After making a few tools I would like to try some hardware like sliding bolts, hinges and latches to use on my metal/wood furniture projects.

DSW
11-10-2015, 12:53 AM
There's been a lot of info on stuff like spring material and axle shafts posted up over on Iforgeiron. Assuming you can get on ( I have had issues for the last three days) there's a ton of discussion to read on these subjects.

Breaker points are good tough steel that can be found fairly easily. Talk to any rental center and see if they have any broken point you can have or if they will save some for you. Axle shafts are also often suggested as a good tough steel. Files are often good HC steel, but some are just case hardened. They make an interesting texture on things like lizards and snakes. Coil springs make good punch and drift stock, leaf springs can give you a good high carbon steel as well. One thing to remember with used springs is that they can often have a lot of minor cracks in them from fatigue, especially if they broke thus requiring replacement.

Keep in mind that every manufacturer may use something different for similar items, or even across product lines. That means each time you get something new, you may have to start over doing tests to heat treat properly. In the long run if it's important, it may be better to simply buy known stock for which heat treating info is readily available vs risking unknown scrap. I've seen plenty of guys go thru a lot of effort only to have things fail either due to unknown flaws or a bad heat treat. At that point known steel would have been a lot cheaper in the long run.


"reused" steel can be beneficial when you want the origin to be visible. RR spikes aren't great steel for say knives, but many people like them simply because they know what it once was. Same goes with horse shoes, files, bolts, rebar and all kinds of other things. Tomorrow if I feel better I have someone who wants me to make a few bottle openers. They want at least one with a twist, so that's on the list, I'll probably also do at least one using some #8 rebar I have and leave most of the opener as is so it's easy to see what it once was.

Wrought iron just about HAS to be reused stock. They aren't making it in any quantity any more. It has a number of interesting properties that make it useful for projects. #1 is the fact that it rusts down to a certain point and then pretty much stops making it great for outdoor projects. The texture of the stock when heavily rusted also makes it good for things like snakes and so on. Included in Damascus billets, it gives you a nice dark contrast to other steels and is in great demand for this sort of stuff. I'd squirrel away any you can get your hands on. Most being sold commercially today is reclaimed stock from bolts from old factory trusses or bridge beams and tension bars. Some is reforged down to more usable sizes, others are sold as is. If you can find real wrought iron fence stock, it's usually of a size that is easy to use and work and in high demand.


Keep in mind material for tooling, hardies, hammer heads and so on doesn't really need to be "hard" just tough. 4140 is a good choice in new stock. Things like punches, drifts and chisels used for hot work often benefit from stock that remains hard/tough at high temps like S7 or H13. I've seen a hammer eye punch made from S7,used on a power hammer come out of the hammer stock glowing red, but the edge of the punch was still crisp and "sharp" even at that heat and having been driven thru almost 2" of hot 4140.

bigb
11-10-2015, 09:18 PM
OK thanks, I'll check out Iforgeiron. I didn't know I could buy new high carbon steel, will call the steel supply tomorrow. Just so happens one of my workers changed out a front axle on his 4runner yesterday but not before he trashed the core so bad they won't take it back, so now I have some axle material to try making some hardies with.
Also wanting to make a guillotine setup. Boy this cooler weather has got me fired up!

DSW
11-10-2015, 11:34 PM
Learn to understand what SAE and AISI steel codes mean. 1085 and 1095 are both common SAE high carbon steels used often for say blade work. The last two numbers give you a rough estimate of the carbon content, so you'd be looking at .85% to .95% carbon compared to a low carbon steel like 1018 that is roughly the equivalent of "mild steel" with about .18% carbon.

The beginning number tells you the alloy type. So 10XX would be plain carbon steel, while 4XXX would be a type of molybdenum steel. 4140 would be a Moly steel with about 40 "points" of carbon making it a medium carbon steel.

AISI steels are more familiar to tool makers like A for air hardening (A2), O for oil hardening (O1), W for water hardening etc. The "odd" ones are stuff like H for hot working or S for impact resistant steels.


I got this from "Introduction to Knife Making" by SL Sells. I bought it direct from the author over on IFI, but you can get it else where as well. I think my copy was about $25 or so plus shipping and it's a decent book dealing with basic heat treatment and other stuff dealing with knives. Knives aren't really my big thing, but I found a lot of the info in general to be of use. Later if I get a chance I'll add more of his list here.

bigb
11-10-2015, 11:59 PM
After a little research I see that new tool grade stock is sold in the annealed state, so I will need to learn the right way to harden it. If I use already hardened steel like axle shafts and coil springs how will I re-harden them after heating and shaping?

DSW
11-11-2015, 03:37 AM
If I use already hardened steel like axle shafts and coil springs how will I re-harden them after heating and shaping?

That's the big problem with using reused steel. If you can determine exactly what the material is, you can look up the hardening/tempering process. If not, you have to do trial and error tests. Having a good understanding of the process helps. Some guys will make a test piece, then try say an oil quench and test the brittleness and hardness of the piece. If it won't harden, then they'll do another test and try say water instead. If it breaks, it's obviously not how you want to do things with that steel, and you start over again with a new test...

Some research on places like IFI can help you narrow down the list of what might or might not work based on past experiences and research others have done, but it's no guarantee that what you have is the same stuff, or will preform the same. This is often why so many times people suggest going with a known stock vs something recycled as you can simply look up the stock you bought and then apply the procedures to match what you have rather than guess and maybe fail.


Hardy tools many times don't HAVE to be hardened. Plenty of people make do with mild steel for occasional hobby use. It's only when you expect to need to get thousands of uses from a tool in a production setting that you really need to start looking at specialized materials. For hobby use, starting out with a good tough steel will give you plenty of life, even if it's not hardened and heat treated. Just slow cool instead of quenching and use as is. Same goes with say hammers. If you NEED a hardened tool, say a cold cut hardy, then you need to research and experiment with the stock you have, OR simply buy something special you know that info on for that project.


I meant to mention earlier that the dies for my G2 guillotine setup are simple 1018 steel, nothing fancy. 1/2" x 2 1/2" from what I remember. Yeah the tops mushroom some if you beat them with a steel hammer instead of a soft face hammer like lead or brass, but the dies in the schools units aren't terrible after 3 or 4 years of students using them with steel hammers. This makes them inexpensive and easy to make your own custom shapes, and if the tops get too bad, just grind them down some.

Thats Hot
11-11-2015, 02:01 PM
Here are some pic. of a Hay Budden. Seller says that it is 165lbs. and it feels like it. He is asking $800.00.... Should I say yes or Run aaaaaway from it126929112693011269311 it is here in Ocala.

Lis2323
11-11-2015, 02:51 PM
I may be out of touch, but ....id keep looking.:waving:

Terry

BD1
11-11-2015, 03:03 PM
Anvils are at crazy prices in my area. Heavy ones like that which are decent are hard to find. If available big bucks !
Do you need it or want it ? :D I buy sometimes when I want it to. :laugh:

ishuum
11-11-2015, 05:03 PM
Has the tip of the horn been repaired?

Thats Hot
11-11-2015, 05:31 PM
I am not sure I will get a better look in the Thur. am..

ThorsHammer
11-11-2015, 05:53 PM
May have just been cleaned up for a specific project. The horn typically isn't hardened. So even if it was repaired I wouldn't be to concerned about it as far as its usefulness.

shortfuse
11-11-2015, 07:56 PM
HB's are premium anvils. You have to be the judge of what's affordable for you. From the photos, that one seems to be in very good shape. The horn is not that important except as a bargaining tool. I paid around $2.20/lb for my 170# HB, and jumped on it, but would have gladly paid in the mid $400's for it. Depends on where you live, the abundance of anvils there, and your "pucker point" on price. The "asking" price is seldom the selling price...see if you can get it cheaper; $800 seems high for a 165# anvil, HB or otherwise.

bigb
11-12-2015, 09:23 PM
That's the big problem with using reused steel. If you can determine exactly what the material is, you can look up the hardening/tempering process. If not, you have to do trial and error tests. Having a good understanding of the process helps. Some guys will make a test piece, then try say an oil quench and test the brittleness and hardness of the piece. If it won't harden, then they'll do another test and try say water instead. If it breaks, it's obviously not how you want to do things with that steel, and you start over again with a new test...

Some research on places like IFI can help you narrow down the list of what might or might not work based on past experiences and research others have done, but it's no guarantee that what you have is the same stuff, or will preform the same. This is often why so many times people suggest going with a known stock vs something recycled as you can simply look up the stock you bought and then apply the procedures to match what you have rather than guess and maybe fail.


Hardy tools many times don't HAVE to be hardened. Plenty of people make do with mild steel for occasional hobby use. It's only when you expect to need to get thousands of uses from a tool in a production setting that you really need to start looking at specialized materials. For hobby use, starting out with a good tough steel will give you plenty of life, even if it's not hardened and heat treated. Just slow cool instead of quenching and use as is. Same goes with say hammers. If you NEED a hardened tool, say a cold cut hardy, then you need to research and experiment with the stock you have, OR simply buy something special you know that info on for that project.


I meant to mention earlier that the dies for my G2 guillotine setup are simple 1018 steel, nothing fancy. 1/2" x 2 1/2" from what I remember. Yeah the tops mushroom some if you beat them with a steel hammer instead of a soft face hammer like lead or brass, but the dies in the schools units aren't terrible after 3 or 4 years of students using them with steel hammers. This makes them inexpensive and easy to make your own custom shapes, and if the tops get too bad, just grind them down some.

Thanks for all the good info. I just ordered a hardback copy of Donald Streeter's Professional Smithing and Kindle versions of The DIY Blacksmithing Book (Terran Marks), Forge-Practice and Heat Treatment of Steel (Bacon/Markham), The Complete Modern Blacksmith(Weygers), Practical Blacksmithing Vol 1(Richardson) and Forming Copper (Goehl) just because I have a bit of copper and it was only $3. Some of the Kindle books are amazingly cheap, the DIY one was only a buck. Anyway I'll have lots of reading for the holidays.

DSW
11-12-2015, 10:53 PM
I'll have to look into the copper one. I just picked up about 15 lbs of scrap copper flashing to play with this winter.

I know I have the Weygers book and probably the Richardson one. I have at least 2 dozen different smithing books at this point and I'm starting to loose track of what I have off the top of my head.

bigb
11-16-2015, 10:39 PM
Here's some pics of the anvil. I really wanted a heavier one but they are scarce around here and really expensive. I paid $150 for this one and used it already, it feels really good. One of my friends is suspicious about the "Made in Sweden" stamp, he says the letters look newer than the anvil.

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e184/bossmonkie/2015-11-16%2019.10.45_zpspussrn9n.jpg (http://s39.photobucket.com/user/bossmonkie/media/2015-11-16%2019.10.45_zpspussrn9n.jpg.html)

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e184/bossmonkie/2015-11-16%2019.10.29_zpsgksxydzj.jpg (http://s39.photobucket.com/user/bossmonkie/media/2015-11-16%2019.10.29_zpsgksxydzj.jpg.html)

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e184/bossmonkie/2015-11-16%2019.10.11_zpsx3twr0at.jpg (http://s39.photobucket.com/user/bossmonkie/media/2015-11-16%2019.10.11_zpsx3twr0at.jpg.html)
The guy I bought it from said it was part of a whole blacksmith shop he bought. Under close examination you can see the steel top, about 1/2" thick. I know it is well used for sure. If I stick with this smithing thing I will eventually probably get a new NC or something.

whtbaron
11-16-2015, 11:19 PM
If that came out of a blacksmith shop where it saw a lot of use, and still looks that good, it must be a decent anvil I would bet. Looks good from here anyway. I tend to worry less about the things that affect value, and worry more about things that affect quality.

Thats Hot
11-18-2015, 04:56 PM
Now to make it a stand, and a forge. 170lbs. Hay Budden. 127210112721111272121

bigb
11-18-2015, 09:13 PM
Now to make it a stand, and a forge. 170lbs. Hay Budden.

Thanks for making me drool all over my keyboard! Did you just get it? $$$?

Thats Hot
11-18-2015, 09:32 PM
Yes, today.

whtbaron
11-19-2015, 12:13 AM
That's a sweet looking coyote killer... congrats!

bigb
11-22-2015, 10:08 PM
I noticed Amazon has a pretty good selection of electric centrifugal blowers from $42 to $82. CFMs range from 13 to over 65. Some have a gate, and some can be used with a variable speed control. Any idea what CFM I should be looking for, and is is better to control with a gate or by varying the speed?

DSW
11-22-2015, 10:42 PM
A lot depends on what you plan to use as your fuel. Anthracite loves lots of air, while bituminous will burn just fine using something as simple as a hair dryer. Charcoal falls somewhere in between.

As far as air gate vs dimmer, a lot of that depends on the fan. Some fans use the air flow to cool the fan motor itself. Those you want to blow full power across the fan, then bleed off the excess air with an airgate. Others will run just fine with the motor speed reduced.

bigb
11-22-2015, 10:50 PM
It just seems like a huge difference between 13 cfm and 60. I am using bituminous coal with a noisy shop vac right now. I would go for 13 cfm if I was sure it would be enough, just like I would go with 60 cfm if I was sure I could throttle it down enough.

bigb
11-22-2015, 10:52 PM
By the way, I messed around with the copper today, this is a single piece of #2 solid wire slit two ways and hammered into a cross.

DSW
11-22-2015, 10:57 PM
Blowers aren't only for coal forges. A lot of larger gas furnaces like kilns and glass blowing furnaces use high volume blowers in the 50-75 CFM range. Many of the commercial blowers for forges I've seen are for Johnson GAs forges and run in about that range of output. With bituminous you should be fine on the lower end of the scale you found, but I don't have an exact figure to suggest to you. If anything it's always easier to turn down a fan that's slightly too large. You can't use air flow you don't have. If I had to take a blind stab, I'd look at 20-25 CFM myself, though that's probably still way more than you need. I don't have an easy way to check CFM from a shopvac.

DSW
11-22-2015, 10:59 PM
Cross is nice. I may have to be on the lookout for some heavy wire to try a few myself. I bet they'd sell well at the fair.

bigb
11-22-2015, 11:42 PM
I got about 20 feet for free. As an electrical contractor I get a fair amount of scrap copper wire, bus bars, lugs etc. If you were here I'd give you some. Sad part is most bus material now is tin plated aluminum.

DSW
11-22-2015, 11:50 PM
I'd have to do some digging, but I remember someone posting up on IFI that bus bars had something in them that made them a bad material for hot forging. I want to say beryllium.

My neighbor is a licensed electrician, so I may hit him up and see if he has anything solid in that size. I've also got a friend here who works for a company that does nonferous scrap. I'm sure he gets some in from time to time. I got about 16 lbs of scrap heavy copper flashing from him last month. PLan is this winter to play some with that and maybe make a few roses or copper dishes. I may have to ask him to keep an eye open for heavy gauge solid wire as well.

bigb
11-23-2015, 12:11 AM
Well I just took a crash course on forge blowers, seems pressure is the name of the game, a CFM rating in free air doesn't mean much.
http://www.iforgeiron.com/topic/4878-forge-cfm-how-much-is-needed/

Lis2323
12-03-2015, 09:40 PM
Okay I'm new to smithing and recently found a 4.5" jaw (100 #) post vice. It was missing the spring and mounting bracket which is apparently quite common. Other than that it only required dismantling, wire brushing and lube.

I replaced the original thrust washer on the adjusting screw with a bearing insert out of a pillow block I had sitting around. This allows for easier tightening and loosening of the jaws under pressure.

I'm certain the mod I did is old news, but I hadn't noticed any mention of it. My apologies if it has. :p

Terry

bigb
12-05-2015, 11:53 PM
Went to a local Open Forge event today. The owner of this shop (Holy Hammer Iron works) Harold graciously gives his time and materials several times a year to host the events. Many who show up are AABA members and many are there to help beginners get started. This time I took my son and my 11 year old grandson. They made candle stick holders. The little one got his first burn today when he dropped his work on the floor on the way back to the forge and reached down to pick it up with his hands. I told him he was very lucky that he got that out of the way on his first smithing experience!

Here is Harold's shop, pics are of the inside shop and the outside shop. 2 coal forges, 2 propane, power hammer, shear, Ellis 1600, planisher, several presses, drill presses, tons of hand tools and a lineup of welders and OA.

bigb
12-05-2015, 11:56 PM
Here are some pics of my son and grandson working on their stuff, and a pic of some of the work

whtbaron
12-06-2015, 02:39 PM
Great pics...nice to see the next generation getting involved. All the cheap junk in the market just might cause blacksmithing to make a comeback.

Equilibrium
12-07-2015, 10:47 AM
bigb> "Went to a local Open Forge event today." Sure does look like everyone attending had a really good time. I wonder if there are listings of Open Forge events by state somewhere?

Lis2323
12-07-2015, 10:53 AM
bgb. Gotta love that top pic of your grandson 'goin at it'! :)

Terry

bigb
12-07-2015, 11:50 PM
. I wonder if there are listings of Open Forge events by state somewhere?

Check here:

http://www.abana-chapter.com/

I joined the Arizona chapter (AABA) and I get the newsletters. It was only $35.

edit: I just checked some of those links and a lot of them seem to be broken, you'll probably have to locate the name of one near your area and just google it.

BD1
12-09-2015, 11:49 PM
Saw this on Craigs list tonight. Massive '' 640 '' pound anvil!! - $2100 (Milwaukee) http://milwaukee.craigslist.org/tls/5353314582.html
Dimensions are as follows;

-height: 14.5"
-overall length: 41"
-face: 7"
-footprint: 17" X 14.25"
-hardie: 1.5"
-pritchel: 7/8"

1287381

Thats Hot
12-13-2015, 05:58 PM
I am going to try and make my first forge this week, here is the start. Any tips would be a big help..12909211290931129094112909511290961

Thats Hot
12-13-2015, 06:00 PM
More pict. The last two pict are the wife's new cook top..129097112909811290991

shortfuse
12-13-2015, 11:16 PM
That cook top looks neat, but if your wife cooks anything on the forge, you better be using charcoal!!:eek:

If you use coal, you'll have the blackest, dirtiest pot in the country, not to mention the grimy-est, foul-est tasting food anywhere!!!

DSW
12-13-2015, 11:21 PM
That's hot, I may move this to it's own thread if your build discussion takes off, just to keep things simple here.

DSW
12-13-2015, 11:27 PM
That's hot, Some more info on the size of your rotor ( diameter and depth) as well as what you plan to use as fuel would help. Charcoal needs a deeper fire than say coal/coke does, but a really large diameter with charcoal means you burn up a ton of fuel for little purpose.

If need be you can clay up the rotor to reduce it's volume.

Is the plate we are seeing going to be your grate, or is it just to attach your air piping?

A table around the rotor will allow you a place to have extra fuel. With coal that can be important as you move green coal in towards the fire, it automatically cokes. With Charcoal it will allow you to have a taller fire if need be.

Thats Hot
12-14-2015, 09:07 AM
That's hot, Some more info on the size of your rotor ( diameter and depth) as well as what you plan to use as fuel would help. Charcoal needs a deeper fire than say coal/coke does, but a really large diameter with charcoal means you burn up a ton of fuel for little purpose.

If need be you can clay up the rotor to reduce it's volume.

Is the plate we are seeing going to be your grate, or is it just to attach your air piping?

A table around the rotor will allow you a place to have extra fuel. With coal that can be important as you move green coal in towards the fire, it automatically cokes. With Charcoal it will allow you to have a taller fire if need be.

That is the plan at this point, I am going to cut out the center and get the flange for the bottom and the other parts today, ( tee, nipples ) For fuel I will use coal, and I will have wheels on the table to move it in and out side as needed.I will get you the size of the rotor and depth ect today. the center piece I had laying around and i just hit with a grinder a few min. and it just dropped right in.

Thats Hot
12-14-2015, 02:34 PM
That's hot, Some more info on the size of your rotor ( diameter and depth) as well as what you plan to use as fuel would help. Charcoal needs a deeper fire than say coal/coke does, but a really large diameter with charcoal means you burn up a ton of fuel for little purpose.

If need be you can clay up the rotor to reduce it's volume.

Is the plate we are seeing going to be your grate, or is it just to attach your air piping?

A table around the rotor will allow you a place to have extra fuel. With coal that can be important as you move green coal in towards the fire, it automatically cokes. With Charcoal it will allow you to have a taller fire if need be.

The depth is 3", and the diameter is 8" 1/4" inside..

bigb
12-17-2015, 07:56 PM
Lately I've seen some side draft forges, some of the guys in the local AABA swear by them. I've seen two that are built of solid adobe brick with a fire pan about 2 or 3 inches deep and the air fed in from the side. Spanish style, like this (very good book by the way):

Thats Hot
12-18-2015, 03:54 PM
I got her fired up today, and made the rod for the flapper. It turned out nice I think ( it works)..I punched the hole for a bolt for the flapper. 12954211295431129544112954511295461

DSW
12-18-2015, 07:31 PM
That will work nicely. Only thing I see that you might want to do is cut a slot or hole in the back, so you can pass long stock thru if you want to heat the middle of a bar, say for baskets in a spindle.

The repurposed grill should work nicely. You might add a few tool racks around the side/front to hold tongs, fire tools etc.

bigb
12-19-2015, 12:15 AM
Where exactly does the air come in? Looks like you are feeding it into the bottom but your pics show a solid bottom. And is that just a hair dryer?

Thats Hot
12-19-2015, 03:54 AM
Where exactly does the air come in? Looks like you are feeding it into the bottom but your pics show a solid bottom. And is that just a hair dryer?

Yes the air does come in from the bottom, and all you need for an air is the 30 year old hair dryer.. here is a pict. from the back.1295831

DSW
12-19-2015, 03:56 AM
I assume you changed the weight/balance of the flapper you are using as an ash dump since that pict..

Thats Hot
12-19-2015, 10:48 AM
Yes, I made the rod and punched the hole in the rod on my first fire. I was going to weld a rod on but using the forge to make it was the way to go..

bigb
12-19-2015, 11:03 AM
Did you make a hole in the bottom of the fire pot or is there a gap around the plate you bolted into the bottom? Just trying to figure out how you get air to the coal with that solid bottom plate in there.

Thats Hot
12-19-2015, 02:48 PM
Did you make a hole in the bottom of the fire pot or is there a gap around the plate you bolted into the bottom? Just trying to figure out how you get air to the coal with that solid bottom plate in there.

Yes I did cut a hole in the bottom for the fire pot, and it gets a lot of air with the dryer on low. It was just under 5 min. to get the rod nice and hot to beet on..

Thats Hot
12-19-2015, 03:20 PM
Pict. of the fire pot and flapper.129605112960611296071

bigb
12-19-2015, 07:35 PM
Well it looks like a nice build. I am thinking of making a smaller forge as my current one is pretty big and I don't need it so big with what I am doing on it. Did you burn coal on your first fire up? I know last weekend I was heating some 1/2" square that I had split on the saw and when that coal got really going I was getting the work piece bright orange in about a minute.

Thats Hot
12-19-2015, 09:28 PM
Well it looks like a nice build. I am thinking of making a smaller forge as my current one is pretty big and I don't need it so big with what I am doing on it. Did you burn coal on your first fire up? I know last weekend I was heating some 1/2" square that I had split on the saw and when that coal got really going I was getting the work piece bright orange in about a minute.

Yes I used coal, it was about 5min. and the rod I used ready. And the blower on low.

Lis2323
12-22-2015, 06:13 PM
Here's a few pics of the stand I built for my post vice. I filled a cast iron water pipe with 300# of concrete and four 3/4" bolts welded to angle iron framework embedded within.

Extremely stable, but can be rolled on edge or if needed to be moved any distance it can be picked up with forklift forks under the 3/8" tabletop.

BD1
12-22-2015, 08:30 PM
Lis2323. That is a heck of a vise and table. Those are some interesting looking hammers too. Great use of storage for all your goodies. I love when a plan comes together. :blob3::blob3: :drinkup:

DSW
12-22-2015, 09:00 PM
Those are some interesting looking hammers too.

Those are top tools. They are held above the work and the tool is hit by a hammer. There is a very nice collection of them there. Starting from the right, I see 3 fullers, then 3 swages, then a hot cut, then a flatter and then what looks like it might be a handled punch or drift. Above is a nice selection of hardy tools as well.

So far I only have 2 or three top tools and I am working on increasing my stash when I can.

BD1
12-22-2015, 09:24 PM
thanks, I love a nice top on a tool ! :waving:

bigb
12-24-2015, 12:19 AM
Reading Weyger's book and came across this great idea which he calls a "Steady Rest".

Thats Hot
12-24-2015, 09:55 AM
Reading Weyger's book and came across this great idea which he calls a "Steady Rest".

Hummmmmmmmm. I was going to stay out of the shop today.

Thats Hot
01-06-2016, 10:07 PM
The anvil stand is done.. I still have a lot of rebound..131415113141611314171

Lis2323
01-06-2016, 10:35 PM
Nice clean design. I like it!
Is that 12" square tube? What did you fill it with? The handle is a nice touch too.:cool2:

Thats Hot
01-06-2016, 11:40 PM
Nice clean design. I like it!
Is that 12" square tube? What did you fill it with? The handle is a nice touch too.:cool2:

It's 1/4", and is filled with sand.

Lis2323
01-07-2016, 12:00 AM
It's 1/4", and is filled with sand.

That's Cool, Thats Hot:)

Lis2323
01-13-2016, 06:40 PM
A good friend had free time on the weekend and came over to play with the forge. Since I'm a total noob at this I welcomed the occasion.

We made a couple of gate hooks as the lesson involved drawing out, (started with 1/8"x2" shearings) hot cuts, forming eyes and math.

Made a couple of hold downs out of old tire irons also. They fit the Pritchard hole on the anvil as well as my weld and post vice tables. Couldn't make them "work" until we realized they only need a vertical "love tap to make them secure. The same tap (horizontal at the bend) is all that is needed to release.

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1321181

Thats Hot
01-14-2016, 02:52 PM
Nice..

51cub
01-14-2016, 05:10 PM
I'm liking those tire iron hold-downs. They're the cats crap-cutter!

bigb
01-23-2016, 11:21 PM
Presently my home made forge has about a 1.25" Tuyre opening about 6 or 7" down from the hearth area. I have been using a 3" shower drain for a tuyre plate which places it about 1.5" above the funnel shaped fire pot. I noticed when the plate is open very little blower air is needed. My shop vac has no trouble pushing thru the ash and clinker that collects on top of the plate, but I find the air flow is too much. I built a blower with a small wheel and an air gate which worked great until the plate clogged up. Continually poking down to the plate to open it up was the only way to keep it hot enough. Also, the fire is down there pretty low which makes it difficult to get the work piece in there. I am thinking I should be using a larger plate, one that won't clog as easily. Also, a larger one, say 6 or 7 inches across, would raise the fire up about 3 more inches instead of it being down in the hole. I have some 1/4" plate, any idea how big to make the holes? Is it okay to have the clinker plate 4" or so above the tuyre?

DSW
01-25-2016, 07:53 AM
I'm still recovering from sleep deprivation from the storm, so things are connecting as well as they should right now.

Post picts of your forge again ( or tell me where they were originally posted and I'll move them to your other thread on the fire pot to have them all together)

The problem with raising the grate up too high is that you'll spread out the air a lot and end up with a really big fire, if I am understanding what you want to do. When I can see the original picts ( too tired right now to go hunt them down honestly) I'll figure out what we need to do to get you set up right.

bigb
01-25-2016, 09:40 AM
I'm still recovering from sleep deprivation from the storm, so things are connecting as well as they should right now.

Post picts of your forge again ( or tell me where they were originally posted and I'll move them to your other thread on the fire pot to have them all together)

The problem with raising the grate up too high is that you'll spread out the air a lot and end up with a really big fire, if I am understanding what you want to do. When I can see the original picts ( too tired right now to go hunt them down honestly) I'll figure out what we need to do to get you set up right.

After doing some research I think most of my problem was trying to keep too small of a fire. If I make a bigger fire it will put the sweet spot up where I can get to it easier. Also I have recoated the dirt/clay with refractory cement to stop the small debris from rolling down and clogging my grate. I have a lot of pea sized coal and coal dust at the bottom of my pan after breaking up the coal, that clogs the grate easily as well. What do you do with all that?

Lis2323
01-31-2016, 10:17 PM
Added fork pockets for moving my propane forge around with the pallet jack. Used the opportunity to integrate some 'storage' features.

Here's a photo to perhaps inspire anyone looking for ideas...

1336361




Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

bigb
01-31-2016, 10:37 PM
Very nice. Do you have a build thread on the propane forge? I started mine this weekend with a piece of 12.5" diameter 3/16 wall pipe. But after looking at a a few plans on several sites I am afraid it might be too big for one burner, might need two. I was planning on making it 9" long with 2" of insulation blanket and a fire brick on the bottom and doors that hang with 2" of insulation on them as well with rectangular openings even with the fire brick.

Lis2323
01-31-2016, 10:50 PM
Very nice. Do you have a build thread on the propane forge? I started mine this weekend with a piece of 12.5" diameter 3/16 wall pipe. But after looking at a a few plans on several sites I am afraid it might be too big for one burner, might need two. I was planning on making it 9" long with 2" of insulation blanket and a fire brick on the bottom and doors that hang with 2" of insulation on them as well with rectangular openings even with the fire brick.

No built thread available. Was researching different builds when I found this one for sale last summer. $100. No way I could build one for that price.:eek:

An experienced blacksmith friend increased the orifice size and while it works fine he feels it should have been a two burner unit.

Terry

DSW
01-31-2016, 11:07 PM
I have a lot of pea sized coal and coal dust at the bottom of my pan after breaking up the coal, that clogs the grate easily as well. What do you do with all that?

Sorry I missed this last time I looked at the thread.

The coal I got last time goes from 3/4" down to dust. I just dump it all on the table and pile it up around the fire. It all cokes and burns just fine. Once it cokes up, I don't have any issues with it causing problems with the finger sized gap between my pot and the clinker breaker. Originally I was worried the gap would be too big, but I haven't really had any issue with that.

I can usually tell when I have a fair amount of clinker building up though. 1st thing that I'll notice is reduced air flow. 2nd if I let the fire burn down is a lot of "dark" areas in the center of the fire, usually if I have a coke cave built up and the center of the cave burns down. This batch of coal isn't as bad as my original lot. There I had to constantly keep cleaning out the clinker. With this batch, I can usually hook out the big chunks if it builds up and I notice it, if not, usually after 3-4 hours, I let the fire die so I can clean out the clinker, say after lunch and rebuild it to continue.

bigb
02-05-2016, 09:25 AM
Going to try and make some of these ants next time my grandson comes over. Any ideas where to get some of that thick wire for the legs and antennae? I have some ladder wire that they use in block wall construction but it is all galvanized.

DSW
02-05-2016, 09:57 AM
The legs look a lot like landscape fabric "staples" we used for holding down geotextile fabrics when doing engineered retaining walls. They also remind me somewhat of pieces of concrete "chairs" we used to get to hold up rebar in thick pours like footings. As far as straight "wire". We used to have some thick "wire" that we used as reinforcing when we did concrete counter tops, but I forget what it was sold as. It wouldn't surprise me if that wire didn't come from the company we got most of or rewire mats and chairs from as they manufactured some of that stuff at that location.

My steel supplier sells 1/8" thick CR steel rod that I have used to make some forged objects in the past.

shortfuse
02-05-2016, 11:34 AM
bigb, don't sweat the galvanized wire.

Just cut to length, place in a suitable container, cover with vinegar and overnight or a few hours, the galvanizing will be gone. Safe and simple. A good way to do long pieces like your "leg" wire is to use a piece of PVC pipe long that's long enough with a cap on one end (bottom end). Stand it up on end and let it work. That way you don't have to find a long trough or container and uses a minimum of vinegar.

BD1
02-05-2016, 11:38 AM
I recently bought some 1/4'' and 5/16'' round from a local supplier in 20' sticks. The 1/4'' was $2.60 for twenty feet and the 5/16'' was $5.60 for 20'. The box stores and even farm and fleet wanted more then that for a 4' piece. Find a supplier that has 20' and buy from them.

bigb
02-05-2016, 09:56 PM
Thanks guys! Went to my supplier and yep they have 1/8, 3/16, 1/4 and up. The 1/8 and 3/16 comes in 12 foot lengths, I grabbed one of each, $6 and change for both. Threw some landscape staples on my Amazon list. Plus I can try the vinegar trick with my galv. With a 5 gallon bucket full of RR spikes I think we can build an army of ants now.

DSW
02-05-2016, 10:21 PM
Shame middle of last summer I think we got rid of all the 6" concrete chairs left over from when my buddy still had his concrete business or I'd cut up a few of the small chunks we used for footings and tossed them in a flat rate box for you. I know I saved the 1 1/2" chairs since they are useful if I need to do a 4-8" slab, but all the tall ones went to the auction.

Funny that's the 2nd thing in the last 3 weeks I could have used we sent off. Plowing, the guy I work for needed a set of chains for the new dump truck. I'd held on to the sets from the 2 Macks for almost 6 years and he never wanted to use them, so off to the auction they went. Now that we don't have them, he wants to buy frigging chains for the truck.... Probably got next to nothing for the chains at the auction anyways.

DSW
02-06-2016, 07:01 AM
Some nice forged gates.

http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?582151-Another-thingy-that-I-built

shortfuse
02-07-2016, 12:58 PM
bigb, if your RR spikes are very rusty, just pour a gallon or two of vinegar over them in that 5 gal. bucket, let it sit for a couple of days and your spikes will be clean as well! That's how I do my spikes and horseshoes. Sometimes if they are very rusty, I'll pour out the old vinegar and let them sit for another day in some fresh stuff. Rinse with water, a little baking soda solution to kill the vinegar, brush with a wire wheel and you're set to go.

bigb
02-08-2016, 12:27 AM
bigb, if your RR spikes are very rusty, just pour a gallon or two of vinegar over them in that 5 gal. bucket, let it sit for a couple of days and your spikes will be clean as well! That's how I do my spikes and horseshoes. Sometimes if they are very rusty, I'll pour out the old vinegar and let them sit for another day in some fresh stuff. Rinse with water, a little baking soda solution to kill the vinegar, brush with a wire wheel and you're set to go.

Thanks I'll give that a try. Worked on one today, it was heavily rusted and pitted. I put it on the wire wheel but your way sounds better. Those things sure are a bugger to hold onto with tongs when trying to curve them on the horn!

BD1
02-08-2016, 10:32 AM
bigb, if your RR spikes are very rusty, just pour a gallon or two of vinegar over them in that 5 gal. bucket, let it sit for a couple of days and your spikes will be clean as well! That's how I do my spikes and horseshoes. Sometimes if they are very rusty, I'll pour out the old vinegar and let them sit for another day in some fresh stuff. Rinse with water, a little baking soda solution to kill the vinegar, brush with a wire wheel and you're set to go.

I do the same thing. I recently saw this about using Citric Acid to clean . Have not tried it but will buy from Amazon on next order.

http://www.hawk-hill.com/2013/04/removing-rust-from-found-objects-without-scrubbing/

Amazon http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000OZFECU/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B000OZFECU&linkCode=as2&tag=coloringoutsid.a

becweld
02-10-2016, 09:42 PM
Some cool projects. I would love to learn blacksmithing

DSW
02-10-2016, 09:59 PM
Some cool projects. I would love to learn blacksmithing

Plenty of places out there that do basic classes if you wanted to learn that way. You could also contact one of many local groups and join. They often do demos as well as have open forge time so that those who might be interested can try and get a taste of what it's like. If you had your location listed in your profile, someone here might be able to make a sugeestion on where you could go or who you could contact to learn more.

Double Y
02-17-2016, 01:29 PM
Playing around with a RR spike the other day. I forged the spike out to 18 inches +/- in length. I had help of a Little Giant 50 LB trip hammer. Hot wax finish.

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shortfuse
02-17-2016, 11:29 PM
Thanks I'll give that a try. Worked on one today, it was heavily rusted and pitted. I put it on the wire wheel but your way sounds better. Those things sure are a bugger to hold onto with tongs when trying to curve them on the horn!

bigb, get yourself a pair of box jaw tongs for your horseshoes. Pieh Tool has some nice ones. I use the 1/4" x 3/4" for shoes...fits perfectly and they don't slip when straightening out horseshoes. Great for making tongs out of 3/8" x 3/4" bar stock, too.

http://www.piehtoolco.com/contents/en-us/p8612.html

V-bit tongs work best for square stock like bar and RR spikes, gooseneck tongs for spikes work great too.

Thats Hot
02-19-2016, 03:51 PM
I sold out of my wine bottle holders, so I got the forge going for a twist. I just need to do a little more cleaning, some welding and paint.. 134936113493711349381

Lis2323
02-19-2016, 05:51 PM
Those are nice!

Terry

Lis2323
02-25-2016, 09:09 PM
I just finished my blacksmith/welding table.

2'x 8' x 3" steel top. 21" web x 7" flange x 1/2" i beam legs. Total weight about 2300 #.

Easily moved with pallet jack or forklift.

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chickenfarmer
02-25-2016, 11:39 PM
I just finished my blacksmith/welding table.

2'x 8' x 3" steel top. 21" web x 7" flange x 1/2" i beam legs. Total weight about 2300 #.

Easily moved with pallet jack or forklift.

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Beautiful table, that is a great use of those monster I beams!

DSW
02-25-2016, 11:46 PM
Nice! I know how nice my 1 1/2" 3'x 12' thick table is for heating and beating. That one's probably almost as nice as my mid size anvil.

Pugs_
02-26-2016, 12:46 AM
Nice table, tell me more about that vise

Lis2323
02-26-2016, 01:05 AM
Nice table, tell me more about that vise

Thanks guys.

Pugs, the vice is a Posi Lock 5 ton hydraulic vice. Air /hydraulic foot valve for hands free operation. Jaws open to 8". The very first one manufactured (in 2003 or 04 ) went directly to a trade show. Serial number 02, they kindly sent to me in Canada to demo.

Used in conjunction with their magnetic jaw protectors (to hold two sockets horizontally) it makes it real easy to assemble u-joints by yourself.

With home made dies it works nicely as a small press.

whtbaron
02-26-2016, 12:19 PM
I like that a lot... and I see you have the leg vise on the other side as well. Great setup. I've never seen a pneumatic vise before but it's a great idea.

Lis2323
02-26-2016, 01:36 PM
I like that a lot... and I see you have the leg vise on the other side as well. Great setup. I've never seen a pneumatic vise before but it's a great idea.

Thanks! It's receiver mounted also. Added a 3/4" NC "foot" for allowance to remove / use.

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rob214
02-28-2016, 11:00 AM
hello
i'm new around here. i don't claim to be a blacksmith but i'm the welder fabricator and i've been entrusted with doing blacksmith work when needed. thankfully i learned from an old timer how to do some basics. the rest i learn on the fly. while we don't do this type of work in detail anymore i still use these tools from time to time to make parts the "old" way. it's fun and challenging. these are a few shots of my shop.

rob

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DSW
02-28-2016, 11:28 AM
Great looking shop. Looks like a Johnson gas forge and I'm not exactly sure the make of the power hammer. I wish I had the space for something like that.

jackdawg
02-28-2016, 04:02 PM
Looks very nice!

bigb
02-28-2016, 08:49 PM
Don't know if this has been brought up yet: http://www.ypres2016.com/

There is an open forge here in Tucson this coming Saturday and we will be making iron poppies for them.

DSW
02-28-2016, 10:36 PM
Don't know if this has been brought up yet: http://www.ypres2016.com/

There is an open forge here in Tucson this coming Saturday and we will be making iron poppies for them.

That's cool. Here's the video that goes along with that link on how to forge them out using the blanks they want you to use.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tL2gup_BuFI

Thats Hot
03-04-2016, 09:40 PM
I was trying something new today. I will make some more for my wine bottle holders. 1361101136111113611211361131

Thats Hot
03-07-2016, 03:31 PM
Another grill frame for a forge. The working area will be 28 5/8"x 18 5/813640211364031

DSW
03-08-2016, 12:32 AM
Working area there is massive. My fire pot is roughly 12" x 12" and many consider it to be "large". Typically unless you need long heats for bends, you really can't work more than 6" per heat.

Something that large will be a fuel hog to say the least, and tough to get good concentrated heats.I've seen old industrial forges like that go dirt cheap because no one wants the trouble to feed it. Now if you plane to forge full size steam locomotive parts or full size sips anchors then maybe that may work but other wise you'll need to cut the size down drastically to have a usable economical forge.

shortfuse
03-08-2016, 09:49 AM
Put a plate, say 1/4", on top. Cut a hole to fit a brake drum or cast iron fire pot in the middle. Rig up your plumbing and air supply and you are good to go. A hood is always nice!

ballingerjonathan16
03-13-2016, 10:32 PM
Hello all i havent had a chance to read this whole thread but i am taking blacksmithing this semester in college and thought this thread was worth the viewing

DSW
03-14-2016, 05:09 AM
Good for you! Nice to see a few places that still offer smithing. There are a number of smiths out in Az, so see if you can't also hook yourself up with a local group. If the school offers a class, you can probably bet there is some sort of local group around. It always helps to learn at the hand of someone else who already knows their stuff.

There's also the sticky in the other section for blacksmithing tools that you might find helpful.

Thats Hot
03-14-2016, 07:09 PM
Here is the wine bottle holder with the cube twist RR spike.1371911137192113719311371941

Lis2323
03-14-2016, 09:39 PM
That came out nice.:cool2:

Terry

bigb
03-28-2016, 09:30 AM
This isn't a real exciting project but something I needed and wanted to see if I could do it. I needed a handle for my scoop shovel and all they had at the store were plastic ones.

bigb
03-28-2016, 09:35 AM
I used a piece of 10 guage tubing, split it 5" and welded the temporary handle on for forging. Heated it and opened it up on my bucket tooth bottom tool, then I shaped it on the piece of scrap pipe with the square flanges I got at the scrap yard. Shaped it a bit more on the grinder, cut and varnished a piece of Mesquite for the grip and there she is. Pretty simple but very satisfying to be able to make what you want instead of giving in and buying cheap junk.

Double Y
03-28-2016, 09:39 AM
I cranked these out yesterday evening. They started as 5/8" texted bar. The bar was factory textured to look like bark. These were made from some short drops.

They are about 4" tall, 3/8" thick and about 3/4" wide. Hot waxed with Gilders Paste Wax.

Forged under the power hammer, then cleaned up on the anvil.

JL

raf
04-20-2016, 10:05 PM
Very nice , Double Y!

raf
04-20-2016, 10:17 PM
hello
i'm new around here. i don't claim to be a blacksmith but i'm the welder fabricator and i've been entrusted with doing blacksmith work when needed. thankfully i learned from an old timer how to do some basics. the rest i learn on the fly. while we don't do this type of work in detail anymore i still use these tools from time to time to make parts the "old" way. it's fun and challenging. these are a few shots of my shop.

rob

13566611356671135668113566911356701
That is one heck of a shop. You are one lucky guy.
Thaks for sharing
raf

raf
04-20-2016, 10:18 PM
I used a piece of 10 guage tubing, split it 5" and welded the temporary handle on for forging. Heated it and opened it up on my bucket tooth bottom tool, then I shaped it on the piece of scrap pipe with the square flanges I got at the scrap yard. Shaped it a bit more on the grinder, cut and varnished a piece of Mesquite for the grip and there she is. Pretty simple but very satisfying to be able to make what you want instead of giving in and buying cheap junk.
Nice work, I am gonna have to try that.
raf

Thats Hot
04-30-2016, 03:23 PM
When done I should have two barn door handles..14106511410661

HT2-4956
04-30-2016, 06:06 PM
Working area there is massive. My fire pot is roughly 12" x 12" and many consider it to be "large". Typically unless you need long heats for bends, you really can't work more than 6" per heat.

Something that large will be a fuel hog to say the least, and tough to get good concentrated heats.I've seen old industrial forges like that go dirt cheap because no one wants the trouble to feed it. Now if you plane to forge full size steam locomotive parts or full size sips anchors then maybe that may work but other wise you'll need to cut the size down drastically to have a usable economical forge.

DSW,

Speaking of forges for full size steam locomotive parts...I came across this set up in one of the out buildings while snooping around in the old train yard in Ely, NV.

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DSW
04-30-2016, 06:12 PM
That's cool. I'll bet that anvil is at least 300-400 lbs.

I've seen a few large commercial coal forges. Units that look about the same size that one is. You need a good size fire to heat heavy stock, or work a couple heavy pieces at the same time waiting for the next piece to heat while you work on the current one.

DSW
04-30-2016, 06:15 PM
When done I should have two barn door handles..

1410661

I like that look a lot. The only thing is that I think the top and bottom of that handle are screaming for something besides the plain bar stock. I might knock in the corners on the ends and fuller a groove maybe 1/2" or so down to isolate the ends. Maybe an octagon or some other stamped decoration to finish off the ends.

Thats Hot
04-30-2016, 07:08 PM
I am going to work on the ends. This is just to lay it out and do a dry fit. The backing plate will be 3/16 flat stock I am going to ruff it some to get a nice look.

BD1
04-30-2016, 08:18 PM
I am going to work on the ends. This is just to lay it out and do a dry fit. The backing plate will be 3/16 flat stock I am going to ruff it some to get a nice look.

Nice, as for the backplate, maybe use a needle scaler on it. I did that on a piece of SS cold for a bacon press, looked nice.

Awesome anvil in that pic too.

shortfuse
04-30-2016, 08:30 PM
Nice job on the rubic twists.

Another attractive finish texture is to use a ball peen with a small round peen on it and dapple it all over, not too deeply. If you need to flip it over to flatten it back out, be sure to use a wet stump or board for the hammering surface instead of your anvil. That way you won't disturb the original peened front surface.

HT2-4956
04-30-2016, 08:44 PM
DSW,

That old Ely train yard was a pretty cool place to get the chance to explore around in. Here's a couple more pictures from what looked to me to be the main Blacksmith shop that was in another building. No doubt that back in the day some serious Blacksmithing went on here.

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HT2-4956
04-30-2016, 09:00 PM
As far as putting up a sign to mark off ones territory this ones pretty straight forward.

It says...."No iron shall be taken from this rack. Call Blacksmith to get it for you."

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BD1
04-30-2016, 09:12 PM
Boy, that had to be really something back in the day. Man, some of those tools hanging there gotta be two man . Are those spring fullers on the long wall by the spool of cable ? :eek:

HT2-4956
04-30-2016, 09:23 PM
Boy, that had to be really something back in the day. Man, some of those tools hanging there gotta be two man . Are those spring fullers on the long wall by the spool of cable ? :eek:

BD1,

I don't know enough about blacksmithing to answer that question. Hopefully some else here can shed some light on what some of those tools are for. As to some of those tools being "two man" well, it'd be my guess that shop had it's share of "double tuff" big ol' boys working in it.

DSW
04-30-2016, 09:34 PM
If I'm reading those picts right, pict #1 shows a good sized power hammer, probably at least 200lb if not more. Pict 2 shows the forge, and it looks to go thru the wall. I'd bet it's long enough to take driving links and so on. in that photo you can also see the chain fall. I'm betting it's on that "beam" that is above the power hammer in pict 1. That way they could take heavy stock from the forge, carry it on the chain fall over to the hammer and work it as needed.

As far as tooling, there's at least one spring swage shown on the end. I can't see the others quite as well. They may be two part spring swages, or they may be separate top and bottom tools for use under the hammer. Big work needs big tools.


I'd love to wander thru a shop like that and take pictures of a lot of the stuff. I'd love even more to have access to a place like that to work.

Thats Hot
04-30-2016, 11:09 PM
DB1 here is my first door pull for this cust. She just asked for s small bend on the handle...She said she likes this A Lot.... and the new ones on the front doors of the barn, I will ruff then up some with thr cust. there helping. They should look nice.14111611411171 I wruff them up s little....I will p/u a needle scaler this week,,,, or just weld said pice to a chain and pull from a fast pu truck..

Thats Hot
04-30-2016, 11:16 PM
I ned sleep bad

HT2-4956
04-30-2016, 11:45 PM
If I'm reading those picts right, pict #1 shows a good sized power hammer, probably at least 200lb if not more. Pict 2 shows the forge, and it looks to go thru the wall. I'd bet it's long enough to take driving links and so on. in that photo you can also see the chain fall. I'm betting it's on that "beam" that is above the power hammer in pict 1. That way they could take heavy stock from the forge, carry it on the chain fall over to the hammer and work it as needed.

As far as tooling, there's at least one spring swage shown on the end. I can't see the others quite as well. They may be two part spring swages, or they may be separate top and bottom tools for use under the hammer. Big work needs big tools.


I'd love to wander thru a shop like that and take pictures of a lot of the stuff. I'd love even more to have access to a place like that to work.

DSW,

Another thing that caught my eye about that power hammer (besides it just having some size to it) is that it's either steam or air driven.

You were right about that forge sticking thru the wall.

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DSW
05-01-2016, 02:23 AM
In that era, I'll guarantee it was originally run by steam. I've seen quite a few large steam hammers in guys shops. Almost all have been converted to air. You need a VERY respectable compressor to run one. Mechanical hammers are usually smaller ones, though I have seen a few that topped 200 lbs.

BD1
05-01-2016, 09:02 AM
It's really hard to make out in the picture, but I do see what looks like a gate valve at wall and possibly a control valve at machine on the long radius bend. Normally there would be a steam trap on that piping. It depends on how it operates, anyway that is one bad a$$ hammer. I can just imagine the size and weight of some of the material it worked on. Really AWESOME for sure.

Thats Hot
05-03-2016, 05:41 PM
Anot1412611141262114126311412641her handle.

BD1
05-03-2016, 07:18 PM
Those handles turned out really well. I made some not as fancy , but I plugged welded them on the backside of the backplate ; just thought I would mention it.

ThorsHammer
05-03-2016, 07:29 PM
I like the handles, but I think you missed out on a really cool option of drifting the ends and riveting on the standoffs. then as DSW suggested something on the ends. Don't get me wrong, they look great. I just love a nice weld free connection on smithed items.

storeman
05-03-2016, 08:02 PM
I'm intrigued. Is there a tutorial or video around on how to plan and achieve those cubes in the forging process?
Jerry

7A749
05-03-2016, 08:11 PM
It's a cross cut slit pattern jerry. Then when you bend it, the cubes are defined.

DSW
05-03-2016, 09:05 PM
I'm intrigued. Is there a tutorial or video around on how to plan and achieve those cubes in the forging process?
Jerry

Take a look at this Jerry.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOFtGFKp4js

BD1
05-03-2016, 09:26 PM
Thanks Doug for the video. Gary has some awesome videos for sure. That's a solid chunk of iron too.

Thats Hot
05-04-2016, 10:01 AM
I built the forge in Jan. this year and I wish I could work with every day but that won't work. I did try to work on the ends of another piece of test steel, and I did not get a very good out come. I have to work on my skills a lot to get to some nicer work.I did weld the handle on the back side of the plate. (just drilled two holes and welded and then grind flat) that did give it a nice look there. On the handle ends.. I did go around town looking for some steel balls about 1" round, I was going to weld them onto the ends of the handle and then clean up the welds so it would look like one piece. With the input and help I get from you guys I think when I put it all into my work I should get better.

DSW
05-04-2016, 12:09 PM
Forging the ends aren't too hard and use a lot of good basic skills that are very useful to learn.


Here's a few videos on doing them. Brian is fullering the material on the edge of the anvil. It's a good skill to learn, but a bit harder to do for someone just starting out. If you use a guillotine or spring fuller to isolate the stock it's a bit easier to do. Even easier is to use the spring fuller/guillotine to form the end and then cut thru the middle of the fullered section so you have the top half of your end, then section just behind to do that area. To do this you need to plan out this before you start. You can actually do one end of both handles at the same time as when you cut, you get two ends already ready for finishing work. 2nd video Mark shows using a guillotine to start the sectioning. He then goes on to show how to make a ball swage that could also be used to do something like this if doing a bunch.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pG5TWUc-D34

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QFqBfLtrHz0


There are plenty of guillotine designs that you can easily make yourself. Look up the Smithing Magician or G2 Fullering tool by Yesteryear forge. Gary Huston I believe did a video on building his own guillotine tool. I was going to make one myself, but after seeing the G2 in person, I just bought the one from Yesteryear forge.

Spring fullers are even easier. All you would need is 2 pieces of round or square stock ( turn square stock on diagonal or round corners some to prevent cold shunts) welded to a loop for your spring. You can make them hand held, or weld a block that fits the hardy hole to fix the swage so you can hold and turn your stock while hammering. I've seen a few videos on this as well.



The skills shown above are great to lean for other projects. I learned to isolate and taper the ends originally to make leaves for key chains and vine work. I use the same basic ideas when I do my bottle openers as well.


Last option, if you want bigger balls, ( and who doesn't :laugh:) is to either upset the ends to add more mass before working as above, or find a nut that fits the stock you are working with ( or neck down the stock to fit the nut) and weld it on the end. Then just forge that to shape. If doing an hexagon, most of your work is done when you weld on the nut, you just have to define the inside edges and top. It's an easy way to make things look sharp.

As far as round balls, Fastenal and King Metals sell them in different sizes. You can get them from places like MSC as well, but be careful, if you order ball bearings, they will be a lot more expensive than simple round balls.

Fast Leroy
05-04-2016, 01:41 PM
Kind of Blacksmith related? Very cool Japanese joinery, wood to stone.

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Thats Hot
05-04-2016, 03:37 PM
DSW, Thank you for the help. I will put this info to work..

7A749
05-06-2016, 01:23 PM
Well, not exactly true blacksmithing but made a few of these leaves a couple years ago. They will eventually become light switch covers. They were cut from sheet metal and forged by hand. Profile was shaped with a belt grinder. Again, not real "blacksmithing" but what I prefer to call forged metal art.

Calling it blacksmithing would be incorrect from my point of view, and I'm sure would offend some who are true artisans of the craft.

Played around with some different color combos on them. My avatar is the same type of deal. It's a back for a mirror frame I decided not to use.

I used a hand held propane torch with an oil quench on this one. I may polish it out again and redo it. That's what's nice about color quenching. It easily polishes off and can be changed to your liking. A light coat of Vaseline was wiped on afterwards to provide a little protection.

7A749
05-06-2016, 01:29 PM
Here's a mirror frame I'll eventually finish. It's made from separate pieces of metal that were individually forged then welded together and metal finished. The frame will get a color quench treatment and be powder coated gloss clear.

The center boss is an actual rivet I ground down and shaped.

storeman
05-06-2016, 01:34 PM
Nice pieces Steve.
Jerry

7A749
05-06-2016, 01:35 PM
Thanks Jerry

Hope to get back into it this summer. Got some ideas and finally made myself some time by selling the dynasty.

Light fixtures are the goal. That and furniture.

storeman
05-06-2016, 03:08 PM
I've had no time for welding or forging in the past 4 or 5 months. Frustrating.

7A749
05-06-2016, 05:04 PM
I know how it goes Jerry. It's been a couple years since I've really had any free time to do my own stuff. Besides the work I did on my air compressor, that's been about it and that was still "work related" because I needed it lol.

I bet you find you're busier retired than when you were active duty :D

tackit
05-06-2016, 05:15 PM
Nice pieces Steve, I especially like how you colored the leaves.

7A749
05-06-2016, 05:56 PM
Thanks!

storeman
05-06-2016, 05:57 PM
I know how it goes Jerry. It's been a couple years since I've really had any free time to do my own stuff. Besides the work I did on my air compressor, that's been about it and that was still "work related" because I needed it lol.

I bet you find you're busier retired than when you were active duty :D

You bet. Inefficiency has a lot to do with it and CRS (can't remember shlt). BUT better than the alternative! :)

7A749
05-06-2016, 05:58 PM
Damn, be here I thought I was the only one with that problem!! :laugh: :laugh:

Equilibrium
05-09-2016, 10:53 AM
I see some way cool photos.... think I'll have to go back over this thread with a fine tooth comb to catch up on everything everyone added. In the interim, check out these twig pieces and the prices they're asking for them, http://www.thelampstand.com/bella-toscana-twig.html

storeman
05-09-2016, 11:20 AM
Welcome back EQ.
Jerry

Equilibrium
05-09-2016, 11:37 AM
Thank you storeman!!! Weather isn't exactly cooperating just yet though. I have a welding to-do list this year that's so long I'll never get to all of it but... I'm chomping at the bit to see exactly how many projects I can complete this season before the snow starts swirling to the ground. ;)

storeman
05-09-2016, 12:48 PM
Think Appalachia. :)

Equilibrium
05-09-2016, 01:04 PM
I know.... I know.... we're trying. We're listing our house this week. Unfortunately, realtor told us the odds of selling it in this hideous housing market are like 1 to 20 even with taking a 40% loss on what we've got into the land and building the structure. On the plus side... pert near everyone selling a house is taking a hit so we have a chance of breaking even if we do sell. And.... every house we're looking at has a pole barn that I could add a wood burning stove to so that would extend my welding season!!!!

storeman
05-09-2016, 02:52 PM
You will get it done.

wroughtn_harv
05-10-2016, 11:25 AM
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Anyone using a fly press? We have a P-5 and love it.

The pull was made with 7/8" rebar

DSW
05-10-2016, 12:20 PM
I've had the opportunity to use a very large fly press in class and would love to find a smaller one for myself.

I love the look of the knob.

jackdawg
05-10-2016, 04:12 PM
Quite clever and delicate pattern to put on, not a fan of barbed wire itself though :)

Equilibrium
05-11-2016, 11:49 PM
Was in Columbus to attend an event and on the way there a girlfriend and I spent an entire afternoon at Sauder Village. This guard railing was outside a restaurant in the complex. I found it quite fitting for a restaurant associated with a living history museum-
--

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--

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teachagmech
05-12-2016, 01:13 PM
I'm about to dive into the realm of coal forge work. I'm more of a welding/fabrication type of guy, but smithing has always held my interest. I'm too darn cheap to buy a forge blower, and I have a few tools at my disposal to build one with, so here goes...

after reading almost every word about 5 times on this thread http://www.iforgeiron.com/topic/19162-making-a-hand-crank-forge-blower/ I've decided to kinda follow a few guidelines on their setup. with a few tweaks here and there. I'm definitely not going to hit the mark on the first try... or second

I drew up a quick 12" fan with 7 veins with about a 10* draft to the veins hoping to increase head pressure knowing i'm not going to be hurting for volume. My first thought was to keep the fan as light as possible to make it easier to turn since others mentioned a bike wheel and belt tends to slip a lot. i had some 14ga scrap, so I cut out the pieces and went to work
http://i1316.photobucket.com/albums/t616/teachagmech/built%20by%20me/2B4C3D53-AC21-45A6-9180-2648C1654AE9_zpstmpymzku.jpg (http://s1316.photobucket.com/user/teachagmech/media/built%20by%20me/2B4C3D53-AC21-45A6-9180-2648C1654AE9_zpstmpymzku.jpg.html)
then after welding it up, i found that was a bad idea. Even just welding the back side of the veins on the plate yielded a massive warp which made balancing almost impossible. After several tries at removing weight on the heavy side of the wheel and spinning it in a drill motor, there was just too much vibration. i will say though, the fan does work! since cordless drills don't freewheel, i had the clutch set low and was more or less stopping the fan on a welding jacket on the table so the drill motor was clutching out before the wheel stopped(to keep from destroying the drill from the inertia of the flywheel over-rotating the drill spindle). when I got it up to i'd say around 1000rpm, the jacket started to lift off the table and into the center of the rotor form 4-6" away.
the warp is just too much and frankly I don't want to deal with it. there's always more than one way to skin a cat! I remembered that I have an old bench grinder at home that I really don't care for a whole lot, but i think it will spin this fan quite well. I'm going to try re-designing the fan rotor to an open design, then make the intake on the motor side to help cool the grinder motor. the new fan will be made from 3/16 plate remnants so welding will not cause such a bad warp, the material has enough strength to not need a full backing plate, and balancing should be a lot easier. If the fan produces too much air, I suppose I could always "recycle the excess and divert it back over the motor for increased cooling should the need arise.
http://i1316.photobucket.com/albums/t616/teachagmech/built%20by%20me/5BCCADEC-786F-4436-9D1C-FF112271D71B_zpsjvriojfl.jpg (http://s1316.photobucket.com/user/teachagmech/media/built%20by%20me/5BCCADEC-786F-4436-9D1C-FF112271D71B_zpsjvriojfl.jpg.html)
http://i1316.photobucket.com/albums/t616/teachagmech/built%20by%20me/C55FE83E-40D4-4DB5-AB31-EA79EB902363_zpsf3re0a5o.jpg (http://s1316.photobucket.com/user/teachagmech/media/built%20by%20me/C55FE83E-40D4-4DB5-AB31-EA79EB902363_zpsf3re0a5o.jpg.html)
stay tuned for more updates!

jackdawg
05-12-2016, 03:37 PM
Pretty big looking project, A lot of people use an elcheapo hair drier
My 17 Yo son when he built his set up got serious. He uses a petrol leaf blower, only problem is that it is MY petrol leaf blower........

teachagmech
05-12-2016, 06:59 PM
Here's the latest update.
http://i1316.photobucket.com/albums/t616/teachagmech/built%20by%20me/5A8864AF-0873-43A0-88CE-A5DB93BF2E57_zpstib4qwup.jpg (http://s1316.photobucket.com/user/teachagmech/media/built%20by%20me/5A8864AF-0873-43A0-88CE-A5DB93BF2E57_zpstib4qwup.jpg.html)
http://i1316.photobucket.com/albums/t616/teachagmech/built%20by%20me/8B0E78C2-6C3A-4A06-A88A-3BEAEB1F0C3F_zpshumhoeqm.jpg (http://s1316.photobucket.com/user/teachagmech/media/built%20by%20me/8B0E78C2-6C3A-4A06-A88A-3BEAEB1F0C3F_zpshumhoeqm.jpg.html)
http://i1316.photobucket.com/albums/t616/teachagmech/built%20by%20me/06060AB8-7C6A-4285-95BE-26559CBFDCCC_zps6qvyu3bu.jpg (http://s1316.photobucket.com/user/teachagmech/media/built%20by%20me/06060AB8-7C6A-4285-95BE-26559CBFDCCC_zps6qvyu3bu.jpg.html)
It may be enough air to keep the huge rail yard forge lit. If nothing else, it'll work like crazy to pull the dust out of the bead blasting cabinet


Sent from my dumb smartphone

7A749
05-12-2016, 08:45 PM
Here's some little flowers I did years ago. Found them in my tool box. Slapped a little oil on them

They were cut from mild steel plate, then forged and distressed. The centers are actual rivets I ground down to the size I wanted and were welded from the back.

Not "real" blacksmithing but forged artsy looking metal stuff.... :D

7A749
05-12-2016, 08:55 PM
Here's the latest update.
http://i1316.photobucket.com/albums/t616/teachagmech/built%20by%20me/5A8864AF-0873-43A0-88CE-A5DB93BF2E57_zpstib4qwup.jpg (http://s1316.photobucket.com/user/teachagmech/media/built%20by%20me/5A8864AF-0873-43A0-88CE-A5DB93BF2E57_zpstib4qwup.jpg.html)
http://i1316.photobucket.com/albums/t616/teachagmech/built%20by%20me/8B0E78C2-6C3A-4A06-A88A-3BEAEB1F0C3F_zpshumhoeqm.jpg (http://s1316.photobucket.com/user/teachagmech/media/built%20by%20me/8B0E78C2-6C3A-4A06-A88A-3BEAEB1F0C3F_zpshumhoeqm.jpg.html)
http://i1316.photobucket.com/albums/t616/teachagmech/built%20by%20me/06060AB8-7C6A-4285-95BE-26559CBFDCCC_zps6qvyu3bu.jpg (http://s1316.photobucket.com/user/teachagmech/media/built%20by%20me/06060AB8-7C6A-4285-95BE-26559CBFDCCC_zps6qvyu3bu.jpg.html)
It may be enough air to keep the huge rail yard forge lit. If nothing else, it'll work like crazy to pull the dust out of the bead blasting cabinet


Sent from my dumb smartphone

That's one hell of a blower Mike. :drinkup:

shortfuse
05-12-2016, 09:21 PM
Here's some little flowers I did years ago. Found them in my tool box. Slapped a little oil on them

They were cut from mild steel plate, then forged and distressed. The centers are actual rivets I ground down to the size I wanted and were welded from the back.

Not "real" blacksmithing but forged artsy looking metal stuff.... :D

Hey, Steve,

Nice work on the flowers.

I noticed over on IFI that you had joined up there, great! :cool2: You'll find a lot of things to interest you and learn a lot. Tons of stuff to browse through, but unfortunately due to a software "upgrade", lots of photos of projects were lost. DSW and I (I'm "arkie" on IFI) bounce back and forth from here to IFI quite a lot. Still plenty to peruse through, though.

7A749
05-12-2016, 10:48 PM
Hey, Steve,

Nice work on the flowers.

I noticed over on IFI that you had joined up there, great! :cool2: You'll find a lot of things to interest you and learn a lot. Tons of stuff to browse through, but unfortunately due to a software "upgrade", lots of photos of projects were lost. DSW and I (I'm "arkie" on IFI) bounce back and forth from here to IFI quite a lot. Still plenty to peruse through, though.

Thanks!

Cool. Yeah, it looks like a great site. I'll see you around over there.

Gotta make a trip to Cleveland and Indy tomorrow. Going to crash right now. Gotta get up at 3:30 lol

7A749
05-15-2016, 11:11 PM
Hers a couple frames I made. I posted one in another thread but didn't wanna hijack it.

The first one I made for a friend of my moms. It was his son in the pic, he took his own life after a bitter divorce. He was heavily into coaching girls softball and had two teenage daughters he left behind. I did it for $100 and wouldn't take a penny more. His mom and dad cried when I give it to them. I did too.

The second one I did originally for my now ex wife, but I took it back after I found out she was cheating on me. Again...

Put a pic of my son in it. He was like four at the time. Both are mild steel and made from scrap. I heat colored both of them, but never applied a protective coating to the second one and it tarnished. The effect ended up looking kind of cool, dunno if I'll refinish it or not. I used an automotive grade clear coat on the home plate frame.

The base the home plate frame is attached to is the same style construction as the "scroll edged" frame. I used a pair of vise grip needle nose pliers to twist the scrolls while hot. After I finished the general shape, I metal finished it with an angle grinder and non woven abrasive wheels on my buffer. The home plate frame is welded together from several pieces, then attached to the base by TIG welding.

Both of the Windows for the pictures were cut by hand with a cutoff wheel, and hand finished with a file. Nothing was cut with any CNC equipment.

BD1
05-16-2016, 09:10 AM
WOW !! Those are very impressive Steve. Love the color.

7A749
05-16-2016, 09:35 AM
Thanks Bob. Hopefully there will be more very soon.

wroughtn_harv
05-21-2016, 10:36 AM
I'm having an issue with my home made two burner propane forge. I've set it up where I can change the orifices easily using Miller mig tips. I started off with .045's but backed off to .035's.

The front burner, closest to the work area, burns like it should at 7 1/2 psi. But the back burner roars and pops like it is getting too much gas. I'm thinking about replacing the back burner's .035 with an .030, any ideas ?

wroughtn_harv
05-22-2016, 09:39 PM
I haven't done much when it comes to setting up the black smith area because if a project comes up I would just work around stuff at it.

We're getting pretty serious setting up production on our drawer pulls etc for ETSY. So I decided to do what needed to be done. Fifteen or so years ago I did some rock carving and made a rotating table. Yesterday I moved the darn thing and then realizzed it might be the cat's meow for a tong and hammer holder thingy do. Tongs will be around the outside upper ring. Hammers will by pyramid'd up above the tongs in the middle. The flat area on the bottom will be for hand chisels etc.

If you look at the shop area starting on the left is where the tong/hammer holder will reside up against the wall.
Next to it is the biggest manual arbor press I've ever found.

Behind it in the left corner is the treadle hammer.

Under the treadle hammer is the slack tub, stainless of course.

The coke/coal forge is in the middle in the back. The big blue barrels are full of coke.

The white five gallon bucket below the coal forge has the Super Quench.

I stacked the two propane forges. Bottom one is a NC five burner, 36" long firebox. And the top one is the one we made, two burner that does just fine at 5 to 7.5psi thank you very much.

The P5 fly press is the sweetest thing ever. It sets on the 800 lb work bench that not only works great as a big anvil but a wonderful tool holder for making stuff act right, hot or cold.

The anvil in the middle is a 212lb Hay Budden.

I'm sure there will be some tweaking over time. But right now anything coming out of a forge is two steps away from where it need to go for working.

DSW
05-22-2016, 09:57 PM
I'd love a nice little fly press. I was looking at a big 12 ton Dake floor model ratchet type arbor press at an auction a few years back. I was really tempted to make an offer on it, but it was way down the auction line and I wasn't going to sit there all day in the heat just to possibly bid on it.

wello
05-23-2016, 05:38 AM
those frames look great Steve

7A749
05-23-2016, 08:32 AM
Thanks Neil. Great to see you around man.

7A749
05-23-2016, 08:32 AM
I like your shop Harv. You make some really nice stuff.

7A749
05-29-2016, 12:24 AM
I made this leaf from stainless steel over the last few days after working hours were done. It was my first experience with stainless in the forge. I did a detailed write up of what happened over on IFI. They don't like links to other sites, so I posted the real in depth stuff over there. If you go over and happen to join, really watch your language. They're very, very strict regarding it.

http://www.iforgeiron.com/topic/46839-forging-stainless-for-the-first-time/#comment-487561

Ended up doing a superficial polish on it and heating it to a straw gold color. The contrast is very nice.

Some pix..

BD1
05-29-2016, 09:03 AM
Ok Steve , your post at IFI was really informative and now for here, WT .................. just kidding. Thanks for the tip on language usage at IFI. I did hours of searching there and did see where a member wrote something that they didn't approve. He apologized and said that he didn't even realized what he posted.

I don't think your photo's do justice , it gotta look GREAT in person. I did some silverware art using a turbo torch to get some neat finishes . What thickness or gauge is that ?
I wonder if a lighter gauge would have a more SS coloring to it ?

Now if you take off a few weeks and go at it, you could probably get a dozen leaves made and a branch working 10 hours a day. :waving: That had to take hours for the prototype. :drinkup:

shortfuse
05-29-2016, 11:30 AM
Steve, very nice metal work! That's a larger leaf than most I've seen make. (Secretly, I never liked the little "keychain" sized leafs...).

shortfuse
05-29-2016, 11:34 AM
Ok Steve , your post at IFI was really informative and now for here, WT .................. just kidding. Thanks for the tip on language usage at IFI. I did hours of searching there and did see where a member wrote something that they didn't approve. He apologized and said that he didn't even realized what he posted.



Yeah, it's also a family-oriented blacksmithing site with ladies and kids...also, users in several countries. They keep it clean. No complaints from me. The F-bomb will get you out the door immediately.

Steve joined up there a few weeks ago, and seems to be having a ball. Lots of interaction with the group.

DSW
05-29-2016, 01:33 PM
Very nice work as usual Steve. If you were closer I think you'd get a lot out of the repousse class the college is offering in July. The instructor is top notch and I've taken a number of his classes in the past. I just can't wrap my head around that type of metal working like you can.

storeman
05-29-2016, 08:59 PM
I made this leaf from stainless steel over the last few days after working hours were done. It was my first experience with stainless in the forge. I did a detailed write up of what happened over on IFI. They don't like links to other sites, so I posted the real in depth stuff over there. If you go over and happen to join, really watch your language. They're very, very strict regarding it.

http://www.iforgeiron.com/topic/46839-forging-stainless-for-the-first-time/#comment-487561

Ended up doing a superficial polish on it and heating it to a straw gold color. The contrast is very nice.

Some pix..

Pretty work Steve.
Jerry

7A749
05-30-2016, 10:49 AM
Thanks Jerry

7A749
05-30-2016, 11:09 AM
Well, did a little more this weekend. Mostly torch forging since it seems to work best for focused rolling bends and scrolling on sheet metal. I'm going to post a thread about it on IFI, I'll do a condensed version here.

This is a base for a picture frame I made about 12 years ago. The frame is aluminum, I'll post pix of it once I get it finished, I have to drill and tap a small hole in the bar to attach it to the base.. Material is unknown stainless steel (I'm going to guess its 304 since what they had that was marked was was that grade) I hot forged the bends and scrolls. Did the scrolls "the hard way" meaning I turned them into the finish side of the work. This means more metal finishing to get the desired effect.

It's NOT finished yet!! :D

Still got some rough spots. I did a preliminary sisal polish on it to see where I was. I usually only finish to around 240-320, the wheel does everything else. I put a brushed finish on it after a polished it out. Dunno if it'll stay that way or not yet.

Heres some shots of it as forged, then with initial rough grind. The wooden heart is the template I use for that style frame. It sits on its side, in the base.

7A749
05-30-2016, 11:16 AM
Here's where we're at right now. I need to get some more scotchbrite wheels, I used my last one on this. It still needs more work, but it's close.

7A749
05-30-2016, 11:22 AM
This is the blank I cut out, and making the first two rolling bends. From there, it's shaping it to size and scrolling the ends. Working in stainless is considerably more difficult than working in mild steel. It has been in my limited experience anyways. After its to working state it's not too bad but you gotta work fast. I tried using the forge at first, but it was taking too long to get to a sufficient heat, and for this type of work, a focused flame on a certain area is preferable.

BD1
05-30-2016, 11:26 AM
SHOWOFF ! Did you hear me SHOWOFF ! You make us regular guys look bad .

Nice Steve, before the cleanup that looks like something I saw on the road. :D But after cleanup, :eek: Really nice with the leaf in there.

Do use a Dremel tool too ? I finally did invest in one and it is a handy tool. I bought accessories at Amazon and Zoro for CHEAP. I mean like $1.10 for wheels that are $3.00 plus. Amazon has some as '' add ons '' too.

7A749
05-30-2016, 12:18 PM
Thanks Bob :D

I have a couple of Guesswin or Foredom motor driven type tools which are similar to a Dremel. I loaned one out to my bud and need to get it back. I only have one speed control for both units. You can put different hand pieces on them that hold spinning tools. I used a couple die grinders with sanding cones to get in the inside of the scrolls. I also used a 240 grit T-2 Boride stone to get into some of the tight spots. I'm doing some more finish work on it, then I'm going to drill a hole for the screw that will hold the frame, then I'll buff it out mirror finish.

Hope to have it mostly done today

7A749
05-30-2016, 03:32 PM
I went ahead and polished it out. It's not quite there yet, but pretty close. Gonna tape it off and get the hole drilled in it for the frame to mount up.

BD1
05-30-2016, 07:46 PM
Nice and SHINNNNNNNNNNNNNNY ! Did you use buffing compound ?

7A749
05-30-2016, 07:52 PM
Yea. I did most of the cut and pre color with a sisal wheel and black compound. The finish was with a loose muslin buff and green compound.

This is what it looks like all together. Wish I would have gotten a little more back angle on it but it looks ok.

BD1
05-30-2016, 08:02 PM
That turned out realllllllly nice ! Is that diamond plate aluminum ???