PDA

View Full Version : Vacuum Sealers???



rahtreelimbs
11-26-2015, 06:29 PM
Anyone using a vacuum sealer to store small amounts of 7018?

roadkillbobb
11-26-2015, 06:37 PM
cook em up in the oven if the can has been open for a while, works great...

Gmmandan
11-26-2015, 06:47 PM
I was looking to get one on black friday. I have rod ovens but I would like to break up the 50 pound boxes and keep them in my rig.

Sent from my C811 4G using Tapatalk

mikecwik
11-26-2015, 06:48 PM
Anyone using a vacuum sealer to store small amounts of 7018?

I doubt it. If you are asking about it I would say you don't need to do it.

Most home guys to not have the capability to store or dry the rods.

roadkillbobb
11-26-2015, 06:56 PM
I was looking to get one on black friday. I have rod ovens but I would like to break up the 50 pound boxes and keep them in my rig.

Sent from my C811 4G using Tapatalk

best prices on quality vacuum sealers and bags that I have found is , webrestaurant .com, vacmaster brand, way cheaper than amazon..great for packing venison for the freezer too..ammo , almost anything you want to keep moisture or oxygen from, as the vacuum bags have an o2 barrier in them..

DSW
11-26-2015, 10:57 PM
I know of a couple of guys that do this for noncode work.

blackbart
11-27-2015, 07:36 PM
I experimented with some I found at a thrift shop, I wasn't thrilled with the results. I also took a regular rod holder and put a small valve and barbed fitting on it. That way I could actually pull a full vacuum on it with an AC service pump or using manifold vacuum from an engine. You can get 28"-29" of vac on decel. No real way to test the results. I would think either would work, but I can't tell for sure.

Willie B
11-27-2015, 08:22 PM
Yup, They run fine. I have no proof they are up to the standard. I live twenty miles from Airgas where they sell Radnor rods. Projects seem to come up on weekends when they aren't open. I can buy a better rod, and store it quite some time with vacuum bags. I can't bring myself to waste the energy on a rod oven. I wonder about a sealed container I could pull a hard vacuum on with refrigeration pump, then seal.

blackbart
11-27-2015, 10:05 PM
I wonder about a sealed container I could pull a hard vacuum on with refrigeration pump, then seal.[/QUOTE]
I liked the vac pump (air operated harbor freight) idea better than a plastic bag sealer. Like I said in the field just plug it into a engine vacuum hose for a minute then shut the valve. The heavy plastic rod holders or homemade PVC one will hold vacuum fine.

Silicon-based
11-27-2015, 10:56 PM
Rod Guard canisters work just fine with a lot less hassle IMHO.

blackbart
11-28-2015, 01:17 PM
Rod Guard canisters work just fine with a lot less hassle IMHO.

Those are pretty much what I experimented with, I just added vacuum after closing it all up. I just never figure out if it was worth the hassle. I don't use it any more, but I don't do any code work where it would make a huge difference. I honestly couldn't tell the difference, although I believe it would help keep moisture out.

denrep
11-28-2015, 04:50 PM
I messed with vacuum sealing too.
Too much hassle and too fragile, IMHO.
I went back to lots of 10# tubes.

I'm thinking that purge-N-fill of a container with a shot of inert gas would be easier and more reliable than vacuum.

Willie B
11-28-2015, 05:48 PM
By lowering pressure far enough, water boils away as vapor. In refrigeration you measure water microns with a vacuum gauge. I don't know how well it would work, just a thought.

rahtreelimbs
11-28-2015, 06:41 PM
Rod Guard canisters work just fine with a lot less hassle IMHO.

No matter how tight you get the canister closed over time I would think moisture would find its way in?

blackbart
11-29-2015, 02:03 PM
By lowering pressure far enough, water boils away as vapor. In refrigeration you measure water microns with a vacuum gauge. I don't know how well it would work, just a thought.
Yes and no. I don't quite understand it, I built a vacuum chamber with a automotive AC service pump, expecting to dry out electronic equipment like radio's that got wet, same one I used for experimenting with rods. Bottom line is it didn't work. An AC expert tried to explain why, telling me I need a micron gauge, not a vac gauge, but I didn't really understand the answer since I use the same pump to "boil" the water out of AC units. I think I have a thread on this site's forum if you search for it. Putting the wet radio in rice worked just as well. I think it attracts small asian elfs that sneak in overnight and fix the electronics.

Drilldo
11-29-2015, 04:54 PM
If it isn't code work I wouldn't worry. I don't do anything special with my 7018 rods and they seem to work fine for farm and heavy equipment repairs.

Willie B
11-29-2015, 07:09 PM
Yes and no. I don't quite understand it, I built a vacuum chamber with a automotive AC service pump, expecting to dry out electronic equipment like radio's that got wet, same one I used for experimenting with rods. Bottom line is it didn't work. An AC expert tried to explain why, telling me I need a micron gauge, not a vac gauge, but I didn't really understand the answer since I use the same pump to "boil" the water out of AC units. I think I have a thread on this site's forum if you search for it. Putting the wet radio in rice worked just as well. I think it attracts small asian elfs that sneak in overnight and fix the electronics.

A vacuum gauge is what you use to confirm the refrigeration system doesn't leak. A micron gauge is calibrated over a narrow bit of the range of a vacuum gauge. Like measuring crankshaft bearing clearance with a tape measure. If any water is still present it'll convert to vapor. Vapor expands, relieving vacuum. A micron gauge measures extremely low pressure, (well below atmospheric) but won't remain low if water is still present.

Water is only one of the sources of hydrogen. Virtually all contaminants contribute hydrogen. If I believe authorities on the subject, hydrogen migrates in the molten weld metal until it gets to the "wall" of where work piece never did melt. There, it forms a "screen" separating filler from work piece. No one can argue that removing hydrogen from the equation is a good strategy.

Those better than I at search here will find a video of microscopic hydrogen atoms in a steel weld. I can't imagine how it was filmed, but it is informative.