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welder ROB
12-07-2006, 09:44 PM
Hi all am thinking on getting a jd notch master are they anygood?Are they worth $249.any info would be great thankx

Diverbill45
12-07-2006, 10:10 PM
I've got a JD model 3 and don't have any complaints. Yes they're worth the price, but that's just the down payment. The dies are what's going to cost you, if you're bending a few different size tubes, with different radius's. I now have 7 sets of dies and am sure I'll be getting a few more sets, in the future.:eek:

One thing you might want to take notice of is, watch out for the thickness of tubing you're bending. These benders do have their limits and if you do max them out there is a good chance you're going to stretch the arms. From what I've read on other sites, is to remake the 1/2" arms supplied out of 3/4" plate. This has seemed to solve the problem.

One other thing, if you are bending lots of tubing, it won't take long before you'll be switching your bender over to hydraulics, as I'm doing. Just ask me how I know.

Hope this helps.

welder ROB
12-07-2006, 11:43 PM
thankx for the reply diverbill45 but I was asking about the pipe notcher.I have the bender and yes I know thew dies cost$$$$

Diverbill45
12-08-2006, 05:49 AM
Hey, sorry for the mistake. Been working out in the shop and was a little tired.

Sorry, but I don't have that type of notcher so I can't give you any info about it. I just have a small notcher that I did some modifications on when it was new to serve my own purposes and it works fine for me.

ZTFab
12-08-2006, 10:57 AM
I have the JD2 TN100 (older Model) and I like it. I've had it for 6+ years and it's still doing it's job.

I recently upgraded to a JMR TN1000 notcher. It is pretty pricey at $600 but this notcher kicks every other notcher's butt...and I'm talking about manual to abrasive notchers to end mill style notchers, I've used them all and will continue to use the JMR.

It's capability to notch higher angles is worth the price let alone the outstanding quality of the tool. As soon as I opened the box, I understood why it cost more. The craftsmanship is unsurpassed.


JMR TN1000 at VanSant Enterprises (http://vansantent.com/tube_coping_machines/TN1000.htm)

- Paul

welder ROB
12-11-2006, 01:57 AM
I was wondering how long does the bit last?

12,000 Doors
12-11-2006, 07:57 AM
I always just chopsawed two cuts at 20 something degrees and filled the ready made vee with mig weld when I mated up the pieces. I found the chop faster than notching.

ZTFab
12-12-2006, 04:05 AM
I was wondering how long does the bit last?


In my JD2 TN100 notcher, the saws last around 200 cuts. Not bad for an $8 Milwuakee hole saw.

In my JMR TN1000(pictured), the same saws are lasting me around 400-500 cuts. This is due to the fact that it has a massive 1.125" induction hardened shaft that rides on Timken bearings in a sealed oil bath and doesn't allow for any blade walking while notching. It's smooth as silk to use.

...and 12,000 doors, I have used the chop saw method as well and can tell you that using this notcher is twice as fast. By the time I calculate the angles to cut in the chop saw, sand, test fit, re-sand and fit again....I've already got the perfect notch that requires just a little cleaning up on the burr king. (And that goes for both of my notchers. It's always nice having the right tool for the job.)

- Paul

elvergon
12-13-2006, 02:22 AM
Damn! 600 bucks?

Something like a mini mill with some angle finder would be a nice competitor!

And you can always use it for something more 8S

I did today around 70 notches with one...easy,..soo easy...before I used an end mill and took around 10 mins to make a notch (and make the endmill hold)... With the mill It only took 1:20 mins per notch with feeding rate and turning at 80 RPM´s, not VERY fast but I want to make the saw hold :D

ZTFab
12-13-2006, 10:05 AM
You mean something like this?

They work good but they also cost about $4000 and still can't notch as high of an angle as the JMR unit...and I can notch a tube in about 30 seconds with the JMR.

$600 doesn't sound so bad now does it.:)

MicroZone
12-13-2006, 01:01 PM
I'd like to find something relatively inexpensive to do bigger, as in 2.5" - 4". It takes alot of my time to manually create compound angles or complex notches by hand. If I could do it in 10 - 30 seconds, that would be great!

Wannabe
12-16-2006, 03:51 PM
Read this thread over on Pirate on how to notch tubing with a chop saw:

http://www.pirate4x4.com/forum/showthread.php?t=456800

Much cheaper than buying a dedicated notcher (assuming you already have a chop saw).

Wannabe
12-16-2006, 03:56 PM
Oops,

Looks like Pirate might be down, but try the link later. It is a very good thread on how to notch various size tubing using the chop saw. Basically you cut two angles on the end of the tube, with the size of the angle depending on the size of the tube you are working with.

If it is a 90 degree joint, then both angles are the same. If it is a 45 or some other angle, then the two angles will be different.

Check it out.

Doolittle
12-31-2006, 12:41 PM
I have the JD2 TN100 (older Model) and I like it. I've had it for 6+ years and it's still doing it's job.

I recently upgraded to a JMR TN1000 notcher. It is pretty pricey at $600 but this notcher kicks every other notcher's butt...and I'm talking about manual to abrasive notchers to end mill style notchers, I've used them all and will continue to use the JMR.

It's capability to notch higher angles is worth the price let alone the outstanding quality of the tool. As soon as I opened the box, I understood why it cost more. The craftsmanship is unsurpassed.


JMR TN1000 at VanSant Enterprises (http://vansantent.com/tube_coping_machines/TN1000.htm)

- Paul
Did you make a stand for that or do you use a drill press or just clamp it down to a table?

dobehap
01-27-2007, 12:37 PM
In my JD2 TN100 notcher, the saws last around 200 cuts. Not bad for an $8 Milwuakee hole saw.

In my JMR TN1000(pictured), the same saws are lasting me around 400-500 cuts. This is due to the fact that it has a massive 1.125" induction hardened shaft that rides on Timken bearings in a sealed oil bath and doesn't allow for any blade walking while notching. It's smooth as silk to use.

...and 12,000 doors, I have used the chop saw method as well and can tell you that using this notcher is twice as fast. By the time I calculate the angles to cut in the chop saw, sand, test fit, re-sand and fit again....I've already got the perfect notch that requires just a little cleaning up on the burr king. (And that goes for both of my notchers. It's always nice having the right tool for the job.)

- Paul

What material are you cutting that the saw lasts that long? What thikness?

ZTFab
01-27-2007, 01:33 PM
Did you make a stand for that or do you use a drill press or just clamp it down to a table?


I use a 1/2" DeWalt hand drill and have the notcher bolted to one of my fab tables.

ZTFab
01-27-2007, 01:39 PM
What material are you cutting that the saw lasts that long? What thikness?


The materials I use are regular ERW mild steel, DOM mild steel and 4130 and vary in diameter from 3/4" to 2".

Most thicknesses I use are .065" to .134" depending on what I'm building.

The key to having the saws last this long is to let the saw do the work with gentle pressure for the feed.

I've noticed that the JMR notcher I have is able to make so many cuts because the shaft has almost zero run-out with the hole saw attached. This helps keep the saw centered in the tube and doesn't allow the teeth to "grab" and break off. Hole saws don't usually fail because they get dull, they fail because teeth start disappearing.

The JD2 unit is good but in comparison to the JMR, it might as well be from Harbor Freight.

- Paul

MicroZone
01-27-2007, 03:25 PM
I need a good notcher, tired of using the chop saw and angle grinders. :laugh:

ZTFab
01-27-2007, 04:16 PM
Micro...

If you're not doing production work, the JD2 unit is a great notcher.

If you don't mind spending a couple of hundred bucks for it I think you'll be happy with the results.

Mine has served me well for almost 7 years and still works great but with as much tubing work and roll cages as I do, it was time to step up to something a little better.

- Paul

MicroZone
01-27-2007, 04:28 PM
I see they have the JD2 TN-100 and now the JD2 Notchmaster, the latter looks better at just a few more dollars. I might look into that one as long as the capacity is 2.5". Thanks!

Yep, just looked and watched the video, that JD2 Notchmaster is heavy duty and can do up to 3". Looks like I may purchase that one.

slim1998
01-28-2007, 07:02 PM
John,

I ordered a NotchMaster on Friday. I will be glad to post pics and give feedback when I receive it.

Mark

MicroZone
01-28-2007, 11:47 PM
Thanks, that would be very much appreciated! :cool2: