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Planet X
03-21-2004, 01:08 PM
Here are three photos of some beads I knocked out this morning.
1].120 wall mild steel
2].035 L-56
3]steelmix
4]30cfh

1/8" is generally were I switch to spray, but wished to explore the upper ranges of Short circuit parameters.
Note: you can pretend we are old welding buddys and say whatever you like about these welds- talking **** is fun and part of the welding game:D

1st pic: 400wfs/21volts
http://webpages.charter.net/julieray/short circuit 21v.JPG

2nd pic: 400wfs/20volts
http://webpages.charter.net/julieray/short circuit 20v.JPG

3rd pic: 425wfs/22volts w/higher travel rate.
http://webpages.charter.net/julieray/short circuit high travel rate.JPG

Mike W
03-21-2004, 01:38 PM
The welds look excellent but what the heck if wfs? Also, I have about 10% of that splatter using CO2. :D

Planet X
03-21-2004, 02:14 PM
Originally posted by Mike W
The welds look excellent but what the heck if wfs? Also, I have about 10% of that splatter using CO2. :D

Wire feed speed:cool:

Post those co2 welds up-

I dont mind posting trophy welds when they happen, but I think these 'as welded' pics are of some value to somebody learning to weld in their garage.

True my welds are not exactly testimonials for Argon/co2 vs. Co2 , splatter debates:o

Planet X
03-21-2004, 03:07 PM
Here is another ; the bead on the left is 360wfs/19v and the bead to your right is 360wfs/20v. Slightly different joint , but splatter increase evident with as little as 1 extra volt.

Planet X
03-21-2004, 03:09 PM
With material this thick (.120) this is the process I would chose if joint position allows.
Can Co2 match these 'splatter' levels:D

Franz
03-21-2004, 03:22 PM
Sure Co2 can match that spatter, if you know how to use it, and it's a lot cheaper.

Dan
03-21-2004, 05:28 PM
PlanetX,

I m wondering why you are welding 1/8" steel in the 180 to 200 amp range? 1/8" is relatively thin material and that high of a heat input sure seems like it will lead to distortion, and HAZ problems. I think most of your spatter problem is being produced by the high volt value that you are using. My suggestion is to drop your voltage down into the 18 to 18.5 volt range and your wire speed into the 260 to 280 IPM range, and see what happens.

Planet X
03-21-2004, 08:47 PM
Originally posted by Franz
Sure Co2 can match that spatter, if you know how to use it, and it's a lot cheaper.

Hey now I didn't start the Argon vs. Co2 thing, just burning a little wire playing with volts & wire feed settings:D

lotechman
03-21-2004, 09:27 PM
The third photo looks about the right size for 1/8th material. The others indicate to me that you are going too slow for the amperage/wfs and material thickness.
I don't know why you would want to explore globular transfer if your gas allows you to go to spray. Go up to spray and your spatter disappears.
The last photo shows a faint srinkage line down the center. I've done that before. i am wondeirng if anyone has had a weld rejected with this line showing? Is the weld flawed under the face or is it just a suface imperfection????

Planet X
03-21-2004, 10:04 PM
Dan-
I try to use short circuit when the material is no thicker than 1/8", and go to spray if part/joint position allows from 1/8" upwards.
Yes, even 1 less volt showed a significant splatter decrease.

Lotechman-
Over-welding is a common enough affliction of which I may be suffering:o
Really I think these welds are at the ragged edge of high short circuit parameter settings. The glob beads would look more like a spray weld w/splatter. Or so I think.

The 'centerline' is the last place the weld metal cools, it has been discussed here before, some have stated it is an indicator of too fast travel speed, but there are links contained in the thread that dispute that conclusion- :cool:spray thread (http://www.weldingweb.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=215)

Sberry
03-21-2004, 11:19 PM
Ok, I have a wonder too. Are you building stuff where you are spraying steel over 1/8 thich or are you just testing?

Planet X
03-21-2004, 11:58 PM
Originally posted by Sberry
Ok, I have a wonder too. Are you building stuff where you are spraying steel over 1/8 thich or are you just testing?

The most recent thing was a 'trailer upgrade' it had a few things on it that spray parameters were used. But since my mig machine has fairly modest output capacity, there really is not many choices to be concerned with when setting for spray.
Short circuit is another story. The machine can run the full range of short circuit amperage requirements- leaving much to be explored.
Testing yes, but more learning, and hopefully sharing with others that may be interested in such things. Maybe somebody else is on the same rode....

Mike W
03-22-2004, 03:27 AM
I like to test also. I will try to get some CO2 pics. Can you measure your amperage? I seem to run at 100 amps with .035 wire. One of my many unfinished projects is completing my 28 volt 100 amp alternator hooked up to a 10 hp engine. I have 3 wire feeders besides my Hobart Betamig. I was going to use the alternator for a portable rig. :)

Planet X
03-23-2004, 04:47 PM
Originally posted by Mike W
I like to test also. I will try to get some CO2 pics. Can you measure your amperage? I seem to run at 100 amps with .035 wire. One of my many unfinished projects is completing my 28 volt 100 amp alternator hooked up to a 10 hp engine. I have 3 wire feeders besides my Hobart Betamig. I was going to use the alternator for a portable rig. :)

No, sorry do not have an easy way to measure amperage. I'm working on buying a old Hobart right now (fabricator) how do you like your betamig and who would service the machine if it were to have problems?

Mike W
03-24-2004, 05:19 AM
The Betamig has not had one problem in over.....25? years. If it did, I would fix it myself. I will get a pic up of my battery charger/welding power supply. It is bigger then the Hobart and probably cost 3 times as much. :)

LordLimbo
03-28-2004, 08:25 PM
Ok! Im the new kid on the block...here at least but with 37 years of welding almost anything made of metal maybe I can contribute sometning here. at any rate..CO2 versus Argon..in home hobby small stuff nothing to argue about either would do though Id prefer the argon. In the fab shop different story. I want and need the capacity to weld.. short circuit..spray and dare I say it even when large gaps are present (shudder,,shudder) globular, only argo mix will do for this.