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View Full Version : Identify this cable for me plz.



rusted
04-03-2004, 02:08 PM
I need to know what size the conductors are in this cable, or, where it would place in the NEC 310.16

XHHW is listed twice, for both 75C and 90C.

I assume #4 CU means 4ga copper.

Therefore this cable is capable of carrying either 85 or 95 amps depending on which temperature rating it is.

Why the hell does the NEC list XHHW twice?

rusted
04-03-2004, 02:19 PM
Here's the table I'm working with.

hoagy_econo
04-03-2004, 05:39 PM
That is a 3-conductor, AWG 4, copper, underground cable. The type 'U' denotes it as a cable that can be buried.

Hope that helps....

Jim

hoagy_econo
04-03-2004, 05:45 PM
Sorry, I meant to say that the "Style U" denotes it as underground cable. The "Type SE" denotes it as service entrance cable. Can't remember the XHHW designator, haven't seen that hardly at all.

Again, hope that helps....

Jim

rusted
04-03-2004, 05:46 PM
Huh, so that's what 3 CDRS must mean.

Ok, thanks it does help, it confirms that I'm somewhat right. It's got an 80amp breaker on it for my furnace heating elements.

rusted
04-03-2004, 05:49 PM
Yes, read your other response, of course, THANK YOU!

Franz
04-03-2004, 06:36 PM
3 conductors,
#4 copper wire,
Underground usage,
HHW ~ 180 degree +/- heat exposure, water exposure
X, approved for use in porno theaters, damned if I know.
We might have to wait for Sberry to explain the X rating.

Main
04-03-2004, 06:40 PM
My knowledge of electricity doesn't go much beyond screwing in a light bulb and hitting the switch. I'm sure the more experienced members of the board will correct me if this is wrong.

X...Insulation is a cross linked synthetic polymer. Very tough and heat resistant.

Sberry
04-04-2004, 12:28 AM
I aint lookin it up,, screw the X,,,, but, I dont think its underground. Its 100A servive entrance cable. I am not so sure without looking if its rated for direct burial even though the conductors are.

Sberry
04-04-2004, 12:33 AM
What is it going to or what are you going to use it for?

Dog1
04-04-2004, 02:06 AM
XHHW = Moisture resistant thermoset rated 90degree C for Dry and Damp locations and 75 degree C for wet locations.

DaveD
04-04-2004, 12:29 PM
SE= service entrance
Style U = above ground & interior
and the insulation type is:

rusted
04-04-2004, 03:58 PM
Ok thanks.

It's going to the heating elements of my furnace. Between a sub-panel and the air handler. I was wondering if I could divert it to another sub panel as a feeder, and run another drop to the furnace and one to my welder off of this cable.

I have to see what the furnace draws now, but the breaker on the furnace is only 60 amps, the one on the feeder panel is 80. I need 45 though.

Sberry
04-05-2004, 01:32 AM
No, you cannot use that to feed a sub, its not a good idea for a couple of reasons. One thing is that it has only 3 condutors.

rusted
04-05-2004, 01:54 AM
Well that's a bummer because then I need 80' of 6-3. :(

Sberry
04-06-2004, 02:34 AM
remember, cables the ground wire is listed different. If you are supplying a welding circuit it would be a 6/2 wg. It would have 2 conductors and the ground. A 6/3 would have 4 wires. A cord is listed as 6/3 and would have 3 wires.

rusted
04-06-2004, 08:05 AM
Well power is going off any time now, so I can install the new panelboard. Hopefully I'll be back. Worked with much higher voltages in the Navy, but it's been a while. No red-tag system here! :laugh:

Wish me luck!

rusted
04-07-2004, 03:08 PM
I have a Homeline 200A panelboard. AS this is my main panel, I have the ground and neutral on the neutral bus bar in their proper fittings. The Homeline provides a clamp for each on the top of the neutral bus. Also, I have the case bonded.

There are two bus bars marked with a ground symbol on each side. My Ohmeter shows 0ohms between the nuetral bus and this bus bar. Do I need any additional bonding or jumper to use this bus bar as a ground?

Can I attach another ground conductor to this bus bar? I will have a total of 3 ground conductors coming into this panelboard, two rods and the water.

Planet X
04-07-2004, 04:01 PM
Originally posted by rusted
Well that's a bummer because then I need 80' of 6-3. :(

The sub is going to have two hot wires, 1 neutral, 1ground. If your cable has 3 wires all it seems you would have to do is add 1 more wire for the ground. There is no law saying the wires have to be in the same 'romex' coating. .. well maybe their is ha ha.

Remember to the neutral and ground wires must be seperate inside the subpanel- the main panel is where they meet again electrically...

rusted
04-07-2004, 07:05 PM
Originally posted by Planet X
The sub is going to have two hot wires, 1 neutral, 1ground. If your cable has 3 wires all it seems you would have to do is add 1 more wire for the ground. There is no law saying the wires have to be in the same 'romex' coating. .. well maybe their is ha ha.

Remember to the neutral and ground wires must be seperate inside the subpanel- the main panel is where they meet again electrically...

I was wondering if I could just add a ground conductor, and I think I can. Therefore I could use that 4awg wire for a little surplus.

Or, for $1.09 a foot, I can get 2-3 aluminum which is rated 100amps, and eliminate the 8-2 and run it through those holes, bring the heat pump off the sub, and two 20s and a 50 for the welder.

rusted
04-10-2004, 06:02 PM
First, I can't move this to Off Topic. What I'm trying to accomplish is a viable circuit for a welder, but I'm asking a lot of other questions too...

I decided to nix one 8-2 CU conductor running the length of the house. It's for the heat pump. Instead, I'm installing 0/1 Al SE cable rated at 100amps at 60C. I will run a 50amp 6-2 drop for the welder, a 30amp 8-2 for the heat pump, two 20amp circuits for shop tools going to GFCIs, and a double 15amp breaker for the lights.

The main feeder will run from a 100amp on the main board, to a QO sub-panel. This fixes all my grounding and subbing issues in one stroke. I'll never pull more than 100amps on this circuit. The heat pump would have to be starting, I'd have to have 5 power tools running at once, all the lights on, and the welder cranked up. Not likely to happen, and that would be about a 120amp draw momentarily anyway.

rusted
04-10-2004, 06:04 PM
Now that I've dropped over $1000 at the local electrical store, and because the electricians that shop there were so impressed with my 90' of 0/1 SE and what I'm wiring up and my great book smarts, I get the 10% contractor discount. Wholesale Supply in Cleveland TN. Great guys.