Acetelyne explosion? - Page 4
RSS | Subscribe | Contact Us | Advertise | About Us
Page 4 of 9 FirstFirst ... 23456 ... LastLast
Results 76 to 100 of 212
  1. #76
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    1,183

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    I think Jr. is full of B.S. and this is what I think of his answers.
    SMAW,GMAW,FCAW,GTAW,SAW,PAC/PAW/OFC
    and Shielding Gases. There all here.


    :

  2. #77
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    East Meadow New York
    Posts
    1,934

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Quote Originally Posted by browny
    ??? burning water, please explain? As far as I know, water is already 'burnt' ie you would have to reverse the Oxygen Hydrogen oxidation reaction to liberate H2 and O2 molecules to get something to burn (eg electrolysis or some other funky chemical reaction. This would be an endothermic reaction which would consume energy). In fact, water (and CO2) is the result of combusting most organic compounds.

    A steam 'explosion' I can understand (ie rapid volume increase due to change of state).
    Powdered carbon can reach super temperatures at the surface. At those temperatures certainly water can be separated into its components hydrogen and oxygen. And they in turn will recombine and burn at very high temperatures.

    In fact if the carbon becomes a liquid from the hydrogen and oxygen burning then you could even get ARC (Anode, Rectified, Cathode) reactions. I love ARC.


    Sincerely,


    William McCormick

  3. #78
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Chattanooga
    Posts
    1,100

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick Jr
    I love ARC.


    That would be acid, rolls, and cocaine, right?
    Miller Econotig
    Cutmaster 38

    Yes ma'am, that IS a screwdriver in my pocket!

  4. #79
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    East Meadow New York
    Posts
    1,934

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Quote Originally Posted by fivonut
    That's the point I was trying to make, thanks for shortening it up.
    And again at minus seven degrees with a mix of acetylene and acetone, in a plumbers tank. What temperature might it reach in a minute of boil off, in a windy alley way?

    I know it is enough to fool two old timers into thinking the tank was empty. I had the valve open with no regulator on the tank just to see if the regulator was bad. Nothing came out to my human perceptions.

    Anyone that tried the valve would say "someone left this empty tank open"

    You are not supposed to leave them open when they are empty.


    I am not asking you to believe me. But unless you have some sort of proof that either the mechanics of refrigeration do not take place to acetylene and acetone. Then please stat it like you just believe because you believe.

    Does anyone here know what happens to acetone when it is boiled off at those low temperatures. That might explain what I am talking about.

    I am just sharing with you something that happened to us. I gave the temperature of the day and the fact that the tank let no perceivable amount of gas out with the valve open and the regulator off the tank. After it was inside a 50 degree room.

    As I mentioned the refrigeration effect of boil off must be very good for some reason at those temperatures. I would like to know what the boiling point of acetone and acetylene together is. Or how many BTU's this mix absorbs at lower temperatures. This might explain it.

    Others keep posting acetylenes boiling point, they do not talk about acetone and acetylenes boiling point. In a "B" tank mix. I know it changes things for sure. I could not believe it when the empty tank had pressure in it later on, and was half full. The tank I had wide open with no regulator on for about 30 seconds. Knowing it was empty.

    I could have left it open. Could you imagine a new guy, a young kid.

    I know refrigeration, and acetylene from working with it for forty years. Someone new would have said "empty" and left it just like that.



    Sincerely,


    William McCormick

  5. #80
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Chattanooga
    Posts
    1,100

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    The acetone doesn't boil. The acetylene just bubbles out until the acetone goes "flat". Just like seltzer water, soda, and beer have CO2 bubbling out.

    As temperature decreases the solubility of the acetylene in the acetone increases. It is the same anytime a gas is dissolved in a liquid. Cold water will hold alot more oxygen than warm water. A hot coke will fizz alot harder than a cold one, etc...
    Miller Econotig
    Cutmaster 38

    Yes ma'am, that IS a screwdriver in my pocket!

  6. #81
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    East Meadow New York
    Posts
    1,934

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe H
    The acetone doesn't boil. The acetylene just bubbles out until the acetone goes "flat". Just like seltzer water, soda, and beer have CO2 bubbling out.

    As temperature decreases the solubility of the acetylene in the acetone increases. It is the same anytime a gas is dissolved in a liquid. Cold water will hold alot more oxygen than warm water. A hot coke will fizz alot harder than a cold one, etc...
    That was good. Good analogies, very good analogies. You are awake my friend.

    Thank You.

    I admit I had some trouble figuring out why or how it took place. But there was no doubt what happened.

    After the fact it sent shivers through my spine. I just wanted to share it before someone took down a building.

    I grew up with a tank in the garage. With me in the garage filling helium balloons to bring weapons to GI Joe. And making hot air balloons with cleaning bags, and metal caps of burning fluid. As well as making asphalt detonators.

    I would notice the gauge on the acetylene tank go up and down. As it was cold and later got hot when I would leave the door to the garage open to warm it up. I believe it was this, that made me close the valve that day. Just in case.


    Sincerely,


    William McCormick

  7. #82
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    East Meadow New York
    Posts
    1,934

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe H
    That would be acid, rolls, and cocaine, right?

    No, the big white flashes the lightning bolts.


    Sincerely,


    William McCormick

  8. #83
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Town of Milton, NW corner of Vermont
    Posts
    157

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick Jr
    I claimed exactly what I claimed and I am right because I was there.
    Billy Mac you are one dangerous sack of BS!! The only place you have been is out to lunch, dreaming up the fantasy tales of yours.

    I've been cutting at well below 0°F. I've had welders preheating structure at close to -20°F. NEVER have we seen a tank that was full fail to release acetylene at those temperatures. The tank gauge will read a bit lower but nowhere near enough to indicate no pressure. As others have noted, the freeze points of both acetylene and acetone are far lower than any temperature we can tolerate to work in.

    You are a BS artist, plain and simple(REAL heavy on the simple). The stuff you spout is going to get somebody hurt because they didn't know better than to believe you. Best thing that could happen here is for the administrator to get a sack and send you packing.

  9. #84
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    91

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Why is it that in the winter when you pick up a new flat top acetylene bottle there is about a half teaspoon of antifreeze in the valve?

  10. #85
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Custer Park, IL
    Posts
    242

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan N
    Billy Mac you are one dangerous sack of BS!! The only place you have been is out to lunch, dreaming up the fantasy tales of yours.

    I've been cutting at well below 0°F. I've had welders preheating structure at close to -20°F. NEVER have we seen a tank that was full fail to release acetylene at those temperatures. The tank gauge will read a bit lower but nowhere near enough to indicate no pressure. As others have noted, the freeze points of both acetylene and acetone are far lower than any temperature we can tolerate to work in.

    You are a BS artist, plain and simple(REAL heavy on the simple). The stuff you spout is going to get somebody hurt because they didn't know better than to believe you. Best thing that could happen here is for the administrator to get a sack and send you packing.
    Yup, I would agree!!!
    Ron

    ShopFloorTalk

    Millermatic 350P, M-25, M-40 guns
    Dynasty 300DX, Coolmate 3, Crafter CS-310 Torch
    Trailblazer 302, 12RC, WC-24
    30A spoolgun
    Spectrum 2050

    Thermal Arc Plasma Welder PS-3000/WC-100B

  11. #86
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Laramie, Wy.
    Posts
    163

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    I hate to do this, but there comes a time when enough is enough...................

    This message is hidden because William McCormick Jr is on your ignore list.

  12. #87
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    East Meadow New York
    Posts
    1,934

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan N
    Billy Mac you are one dangerous sack of BS!! The only place you have been is out to lunch, dreaming up the fantasy tales of yours.

    I've been cutting at well below 0°F. I've had welders preheating structure at close to -20°F. NEVER have we seen a tank that was full fail to release acetylene at those temperatures. The tank gauge will read a bit lower but nowhere near enough to indicate no pressure. As others have noted, the freeze points of both acetylene and acetone are far lower than any temperature we can tolerate to work in.

    You are a BS artist, plain and simple(REAL heavy on the simple). The stuff you spout is going to get somebody hurt because they didn't know better than to believe you. Best thing that could happen here is for the administrator to get a sack and send you packing.
    You were cutting with a "B" tank of dissolved acetylene?

    I have a cutting setup with a "B" tank so I know it is possible. You just need the special adapter.

    I use it like a portable system. But normally even on the road I take the larger system.

    For outside or outdoor use your supplier may supply non- dissolved acetylene.

    I sit around dreaming?

    You could not know I sit around dreaming from what I wrote. Because it is dead on accurate. So it is you that has already said something that is untrue or from a dream land.

    And that catch phrase "what you said is going to get someone hurt" is really just too comical. Someone like you is going to hinder others from getting to the truth. And that could lead to someone getting hurt.



    Sincerely,


    William McCormick

  13. #88
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Custer Park, IL
    Posts
    242

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick Jr
    For outside or outdoor use your supplier may supply non- dissolved acetylene.
    Mr. McCormick,

    I am completely unfamiliar with non-dissolved acetylene. How is it containerized and what pressures is it supplied in?
    Ron

    ShopFloorTalk

    Millermatic 350P, M-25, M-40 guns
    Dynasty 300DX, Coolmate 3, Crafter CS-310 Torch
    Trailblazer 302, 12RC, WC-24
    30A spoolgun
    Spectrum 2050

    Thermal Arc Plasma Welder PS-3000/WC-100B

  14. #89
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    East Meadow New York
    Posts
    1,934

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan N
    Billy Mac you are one dangerous sack of BS!! The only place you have been is out to lunch, dreaming up the fantasy tales of yours.

    I've been cutting at well below 0°F. I've had welders preheating structure at close to -20°F. NEVER have we seen a tank that was full fail to release acetylene at those temperatures. The tank gauge will read a bit lower but nowhere near enough to indicate no pressure. As others have noted, the freeze points of both acetylene and acetone are far lower than any temperature we can tolerate to work in.

    You are a BS artist, plain and simple(REAL heavy on the simple). The stuff you spout is going to get somebody hurt because they didn't know better than to believe you. Best thing that could happen here is for the administrator to get a sack and send you packing.

    Lets for a minute get really crazy, it is easy for me, Ha-ha.

    And take your advice, you are guaranteeing that the bottle of acetylene will noticeably spew acetylene at the temperatures and wind chill I described. So someone that opens the valve on a tank can safely leave it open according to you.

    I on the other hand had two old timers observe a bottle as empty. With no regulator on the bottle, it gave no acetylene at all.

    Yet crazy me, I closed it because I could not calculate the amount of refrigeration effect at those temperatures. Just in case I and the other fellow were wrong, I closed it.

    Yet I am the one that is going to get someone killed? When you have told others to do the dangerous thing. And you do not know how much acetone is in my tank or yours.



    Sincerely,


    William McCormick

  15. #90
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    58

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick Jr
    So someone that opens the valve on a tank can safely leave it open according to you.
    No body should EVER do that regardless of the temperature of conditions.

  16. #91
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    East Meadow New York
    Posts
    1,934

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Quote Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder
    Mr. McCormick,

    I am completely unfamiliar with non-dissolved acetylene. How is it containerized and what pressures is it supplied in?
    It seems like today they call it all dissolved.

    However as some have mentioned their tanks are outside and they have cut at extremely low temperatures. I have friends that do the same all the time.

    I can with the larger torch on very cold days cut as well. But I have not with the same wind chill in an alley.

    I have to assume that their tanks do not have the same proportions of acetone as my supplier puts in them. Or they are over or understating their temperatures.

    Or I have understated the windchill, or someone has assumed that the windchill in the alley way would not create what I said it will.

    My tanks have the right pressures at 70 degrees Fahrenheit even the "B" tanks. So I must assume that their tanks have less acetone or no acetone. Or they are not working at as low a temperature.

    I have knocked the valves off the larger acetylene tanks and they have high pressure in them. It did not explode by actual experience.

    Because as I said our tanks in the windy alley way just quit on us. Showed zero pressure from an open main valve. And then later came back up to pressure.

    But consider this there is cement, sand, and asbestos inside some of the tanks. All those substances contain oxygen, different companies use different substances.

    Sand has oxygen attached to it. So the acetone is there to absorb any of the oxygen in the tank.

    That means that you have to wet the tank surface for sure. How much more you need or want I do not know. But the suppliers probably think better safe then sorry.

    I was told that they had undissolved acetylene. But that in our area we use dissolved acetylene. That is all I can say about it actually. It was when I was learning about it as a kid.

    I am not arguing or doubting anyone. I take it all in compare it to what I have done. And only if I get a conflict do I mention it. I have a conflict about saying that acetylene is good at 7 degrees Fahrenheit in a windy alleyway.




    Sincerely,


    William McCormick

  17. #92
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    East Meadow New York
    Posts
    1,934

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Quote Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder
    Mr. McCormick,

    I am completely unfamiliar with non-dissolved acetylene. How is it containerized and what pressures is it supplied in?
    Well I have seen empty tanks of acetylene and they did not have any noticeable amount of acetone in them. So their idea of absorbed, and mine might be two different things.

    As I said I know they must coat the cement with acetone. But I do not know if they actually create a soda type of mix in the bottle between the acetone and the acetylene.

    But I also do not know, if after mixing the two substances, if they take on some new weird properties. Maybe it only takes a little acetone to mix with the acetylene.

    A friend of mine a compressor expert, actually held a Plexiglas see through container of acetylene and he said under pressure it is more like a white ball of plasma, rather then a liquid. He got me to shake my own tank. And it does have a light kind of weird feeling. But I have never seen it inside a Plexiglas container.

    I would like to though.

    Sincerely,


    William McCormick

  18. #93
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Town of Milton, NW corner of Vermont
    Posts
    157

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick Jr
    Lets for a minute get really crazy, it is easy for me, Ha-ha.

    And take your advice, you are guaranteeing that the bottle of acetylene will noticeably spew acetylene at the temperatures and wind chill I described. So someone that opens the valve on a tank can safely leave it open according to you.
    You better show me where I said anything about leaving a tank open, Mr. BS!

    Also, in your ramblings about "wind chill",,, Wind velocity has absolutely ZERO bearing on an object that is not actively being warmed. An inert body will only cool to the temperature of the ambient air. Look it up!

    Once again you are spoutiong nonsense about keeping others from learning "the truth as babbled by Billy Mac. How can it be that you are the only one who knows all this crap?

    Also,, I did not say anyone was using a B tank to cut on a cold day. Rarely do you see B tanks on sites without a plumber in evidence.

    In case you haven't noticed, it is generally accpeted that the crap you go on about has some pretty dangerous possibilities for anyone foolish enough to believe it.

  19. #94
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    In A Nice Comfy Chair
    Posts
    18,746

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick Jr
    It seems like today they call it all dissolved.

    However as some have mentioned their tanks are outside and they have cut at extremely low temperatures. I have friends that do the same all the time.

    I can with the larger torch on very cold days cut as well. But I have not with the same wind chill in an alley.

    I have to assume that their tanks do not have the same proportions of acetone as my supplier puts in them. Or they are over or understating their temperatures.

    Or I have understated the windchill, or someone has assumed that the windchill in the alley way would not create what I said it will.

    My tanks have the right pressures at 70 degrees Fahrenheit even the "B" tanks. So I must assume that their tanks have less acetone or no acetone. Or they are not working at as low a temperature.

    I have knocked the valves off the larger acetylene tanks and they have high pressure in them. It did not explode by actual experience.

    Because as I said our tanks in the windy alley way just quit on us. Showed zero pressure from an open main valve. And then later came back up to pressure.

    But consider this there is cement, sand, and asbestos inside some of the tanks. All those substances contain oxygen, different companies use different substances.

    Sand has oxygen attached to it. So the acetone is there to absorb any of the oxygen in the tank.

    That means that you have to wet the tank surface for sure. How much more you need or want I do not know. But the suppliers probably think better safe then sorry.

    I was told that they had undissolved acetylene. But that in our area we use dissolved acetylene. That is all I can say about it actually. It was when I was learning about it as a kid.

    I am not arguing or doubting anyone. I take it all in compare it to what I have done. And only if I get a conflict do I mention it. I have a conflict about saying that acetylene is good at 7 degrees Fahrenheit in a windy alleyway.




    Sincerely,


    William McCormick




    How the fu(k does sand and concrete get into a tank????

    Now I've read everything..

    ...zap!


    I am not completely insane..
    Some parts are missing

    Professional Driver on a closed course....
    Do not attempt.

    Just because I'm a dumbass don't mean that you can be too.
    So DON'T try any of this **** l do at home.

  20. #95
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    East Meadow New York
    Posts
    1,934

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Quote Originally Posted by zapster
    How the fu(k does sand and concrete get into a tank????

    Now I've read everything..

    ...zap!
    I have no idea. And I have not had the courage to cut one apart to be honest with you. But that is what the manufacturer claims is in the tank. Different manufacturers claim different things.

    I bet the guys at Gershaw scrap yard have cut them up. Next time I am there I will ask them.

    I also welded a giant 3/4" chain, garden ornament for the owner of another scrap yard near me, they would probably know for sure what is in them. It took me two days of straight TIG welding the links together.

    I have hit the empty acetylene tanks and they do have a dead ring to them. Like the walls are padded with something other then metal. Tap one on the ground gently, you do not get that harmonic like you would from a 40 cubic foot argon or helium tank. I do not recommend dropping them hard either.

    But you know if there is cement in there, there is oxygen in there. And that is what the acetone is for. To absorb any oxygen. Acetone is a very rich fuel that requires a lot of oxygen. Very much like acetylene.

    Oxygen and acetylene when mixed together become sound and vibration sensitive. My guess is cement is in there because they have trouble keeping the acetylene pure. And the tanks free from oxidation.


    Sincerely,


    William McCormick

  21. #96
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    6,098

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick Jr
    ... My guess is cement is in there because they have trouble keeping the acetylene pure...
    I've seen that filler. I don't know if it's cement, but it does look like lava rock or air-entrained concrete. Maybe it's sea-foam!

  22. #97
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    East Meadow New York
    Posts
    1,934

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan N
    You better show me where I said anything about leaving a tank open, Mr. BS!

    Also, in your ramblings about "wind chill",,, Wind velocity has absolutely ZERO bearing on an object that is not actively being warmed. An inert body will only cool to the temperature of the ambient air. Look it up!

    Once again you are spoutiong nonsense about keeping others from learning "the truth as babbled by Billy Mac. How can it be that you are the only one who knows all this crap?

    Also,, I did not say anyone was using a B tank to cut on a cold day. Rarely do you see B tanks on sites without a plumber in evidence.

    In case you haven't noticed, it is generally accpeted that the crap you go on about has some pretty dangerous possibilities for anyone foolish enough to believe it.
    You said if no acetylene comes out of a tank on a day with an actual temperature at the time, of about seven degrees, that it is empty, regardless of windchill.

    If it is empty as you are so sure of. There is no real danger of leaving it open is there? No more then a loosely capped can of acetone.

    Because someone has taken your advice that it is definitely empty. Like in a scrap yard, before they dispose of the tanks on a seven degree day. They could create a terrible explosion.

    Have you been in an alley way on a cold day when wind is blowing quickly through the alleyway? It gets really cold. So cold you cannot take your hands out of your pockets for more then ten seconds.

    Windchill effects any surface that can hold some moisture. The paint on the tanks can hold some moisture.

    The sock that you put on a thermometer, to check the windchill is there to hold whatever moisture is in the air. In the city you always have some moisture from all the cars and heating equipment. It can get insanely cold in an alleyway.

    I will tell you something else, that I know from years and years of working with compressed gases, liquefied gases and flammable gases.

    When you are using a torch with a regulator and you take off the regulator there is always more pressure in the tank.

    What actually alerted me to something being wrong that day in the alley. Was that although the torch was unusable at such a low pressure. There should still have been a reasonably higher tank pressure in the tank.

    Yet even after the bottle spent time in the 50 degree work area inside. When I cracked the tank valve with no regulator it did not give me that reserve pressure. Therefore I knew that there was some kind of refrigeration effect taking place. So I closed the tank to be safe.

    If I had not, at least a half tank of acetylene could have escaped into the tool storage area of the work sight.



    Sincerely,


    William McCormick

  23. #98
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    East Meadow New York
    Posts
    1,934

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan N
    You better show me where I said anything about leaving a tank open, Mr. BS!

    Also, in your ramblings about "wind chill",,, Wind velocity has absolutely ZERO bearing on an object that is not actively being warmed. An inert body will only cool to the temperature of the ambient air. Look it up!

    Once again you are spoutiong nonsense about keeping others from learning "the truth as babbled by Billy Mac. How can it be that you are the only one who knows all this crap?

    Also,, I did not say anyone was using a B tank to cut on a cold day. Rarely do you see B tanks on sites without a plumber in evidence.

    In case you haven't noticed, it is generally accpeted that the crap you go on about has some pretty dangerous possibilities for anyone foolish enough to believe it.
    You said if no acetylene comes out of a tank on a day with an actual temperature at the time, of about seven degrees, that it is empty, regardless of windchill.

    If it is empty as you are so sure of. There is no real danger of leaving it open is there? No more then a loosely capped can of acetone.

    Because someone has taken your advice that it is definitely empty. Like in a scrap yard, before they dispose of the tanks on a seven degree day. They could create a terrible explosion.

    Have you been in an alley way on a cold day when wind is blowing quickly through the alleyway? It gets really cold. So cold you cannot take your hands out of your pockets for more then ten seconds.

    Windchill effects any surface that can hold some moisture. The paint on the tanks can hold some moisture.

    The sock that you put on a thermometer, to check the windchill is there to hold whatever moisture is in the air. In the city you always have some moisture from all the cars and heating equipment. It can get insanely cold in an alleyway.

    I will tell you something else, that I know from years and years of working with compressed gases, liquefied gases and flammable gases.

    When you are using a torch with a regulator and you take off the regulator there is always more pressure in the tank.

    What actually alerted me to something being wrong that day in the alley. Was that although the torch was unusable at such a low pressure. There should still have been a reasonably higher tank pressure in the tank.

    Yet even after the bottle spent time in the 50 degree work area inside. When I cracked the tank valve with no regulator it did not give me that reserve pressure. Therefore I knew that there was some kind of refrigeration effect taking place. So I closed the tank to be safe.

    If I had not, at least a half tank of acetylene could have escaped into the tool storage area of the work sight.



    Sincerely,


    William McCormick

  24. #99
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Gillette, Wy
    Posts
    589

    Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    It just gets better and better...

  25. #100
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    1,183

    Angry Re: Acetelyne explosion?

    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick Jr
    I have no idea. And I have not had the courage to cut one apart to be honest with you. But that is what the manufacturer claims is in the tank. Different manufacturers claim different things.

    I bet the guys at Gershaw scrap yard have cut them up. Next time I am there I will ask them.

    I also welded a giant 3/4" chain, garden ornament for the owner of another scrap yard near me, they would probably know for sure what is in them. It took me two days of straight TIG welding the links together.

    I have hit the empty acetylene tanks and they do have a dead ring to them. Like the walls are padded with something other then metal. Tap one on the ground gently, you do not get that harmonic like you would from a 40 cubic foot argon or helium tank. I do not recommend dropping them hard either.

    But you know if there is cement in there, there is oxygen in there. And that is what the acetone is for. To absorb any oxygen. Acetone is a very rich fuel that requires a lot of oxygen. Very much like acetylene.

    Oxygen and acetylene when mixed together become sound and vibration sensitive. My guess is cement is in there because they have trouble keeping the acetylene pure. And the tanks free from oxidation.


    Sincerely,


    William McCormick

    William, I don't know why you are still filling some with your B.S., The filler in acetylene cylinder , is a very pourus material and each one of the cavaties holds Acetone and it absorbs acetylene to the tune of 25 times its volume, as it is being filled. It releases the acetylene at 1/7th its contense per hour. It does not mix with acetylene gas. the gas is absorbed by the acetone and released as needed. With all your experience, you should not speak and mislead someone with a subject you are not capable to answer. John
    SMAW,GMAW,FCAW,GTAW,SAW,PAC/PAW/OFC
    and Shielding Gases. There all here.


    :

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
RSS | Home | Penton Media | Contact Us | Subscribe | For Advertisers | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement