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Thread: 110 volt migs

  1. #151
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Martha Lake, WA
    Posts
    213

    Re: 110 volt migs

    Quote Originally Posted by koota View Post
    Why do these 110 V flux core mig splatter so much?
    I had a Harbor Freight 90 amp 110V welder - was told they spatter more due to the output being AC vs DC. Half the time your polarity is wrong.

  2. #152
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Near San Jose
    Posts
    744

    Re: 110 volt migs

    Quote Originally Posted by koota View Post
    Why do these 110 V flux core mig splatter so much?
    The splatter is caused by the flux exploding within the wire.

    Protective gases are needed to protect the puddle. With flux core, a solid core melts and then vaporizes from the heat and forms a gas cover over the weld. The expanding gas is inside a melting tube and some of that expanding material throws some the melted metal outward.

    Using solid wire MIG you still see some splatter (from expanding metal and impurities) but no where near as much.

    Dan
    ----------------------------
    Measure twice. Weld once. Grind to size.

    MIG: Lincoln SP100
    TIG/STICK: AHP Alphatig 200X

  3. #153
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    west texas
    Posts
    2,376

    Re: 110 volt migs

    When I run Lincoln flux core, NR-211 I think it is. That stuff runs really smooth in my slightly modified Lincoln 120v machine. There is very little metal splatter.
    Now if I forget to change polarity, going from solid wire to flux core, yeah it gets real ugly real fast.
    old Miller spectrum 625
    Lincoln SP-135 T, CO2+0.025 wire
    Miller model 250 and WP-18V torch
    Craftsman 100amp AC/DC and WP-17V torch
    Century 115-004 HF arc stabilizer
    Home made 4 transformer spot welder
    Home made alternator welder

  4. #154
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Farmington Hills Michigan
    Posts
    19

    Re: 110 volt migs

    why do these 110 V flux core mig splatter so much?
    I found good name brand wire doesn't splatter to bad. I had a HF welder and the wire it came with was garbage splattered like crazy. Switched to Lincoln wire and tips and it was better. I use Lincoln wire in my Eastwood 135 and it works great.

  5. #155
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Corvallis, OR
    Posts
    118

    Re: 110 volt migs

    Glad I found this thread. Just thought I'd share some technical specifications on four 110V/120V, 135A-140A MIG machines. I've been thinking about getting a small, portable, light duty MIG for home/hobby stuff. I'm not a welder by trade, but I do have access to some big boy 240V MIGs down at work in case I need them, which is why the interest in a 120V unit.

    The four MIG machines that I looked at are the:
    Eastwoood MIG 135
    Everlast Power i-MIG 140E
    Longevity MIGWELD 140
    Hobart Handler 140


    I've made up my own spreadsheet with some of the main features that I've found listed in most machines' spec charts, as well as some more intricate details that I think matter. Hopefully this will be helpful for anyone looking into the 140A MIG market. Note, there are a few fields that are empty/unknown due to not finding any info online. Also, there are some specs that are different than you will find online at the MFG. website, but these are due to the fact that I have looked at many sites and reviews, including responses from vendor technicians. Still, this comparison should be used with caution and check with the MFG about any specifications as they can change without notice.

    I'm in no rush to get one of these yet, money, space, dedicated circuit, yada yada, etc.

    Initially I was leaning toward the HH 140 (durability), then to the Eastwood (price), and have recently been eyeing the Everlast....(price, compatibility with DINSE 25, weight, duty cycle)
    Attached Images Attached Images
    AHP AlphaTIG-200X
    Miller Multimatic 215

  6. #156
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    4

    Re: 110 volt migs

    I bought a Craftsman Pro 110 volt MIG about a year ago at a swap meet. I paid $50 and didn't expect much out of it. Figure it could be a spare if it worked. It came with a very flexible 15 foot Tweco mini-mig torch. The liner was toast so I replaced it for 12 bucks. It welds great! From 20 gauge to 1/4 inch plate. Infinite heat settings and wire speeds, fan cooled, a place for a small bottle, easy wire access, and a real steel handle. Pretty handy and goes anywhere.

    The weak points for the inexpensive little migs that i see are the plastic drive roll mechanisms. And in my case, getting new drive rolls.

  7. #157
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Corvallis, OR
    Posts
    118

    Re: 110 volt migs

    Finally decided to go with a refurbished HH140 from hobartweldshop.com. Ordered it on SEP.01 and it arrived SEP.13 on the west coast (Labor Day in there to slow things down). So if you need a HH140 quick, might wanna go somewhere else. But the waiting period gave me time to get a dedicated 20A circuit wired up in the garage. The thing is pretty new looking, only issue is the spool door is just a little dinged up, likely from shipping. Nothing that affects performance or door closing ability. All the stickers on the machine appear to be new as well. No scratches or signs of heavy use elsewhere on the machine.

    The roller drive that came with the unit is the 3-groove "Quick Select" type, which is nice. Can run .023", .030"/.035" solid and .030"/.035" flux cored. I've only run a couple beads with the .030" sample spool of flux-cored wire, but it sure does purr.

    The gas regulator that came with it does seem of good quality. It has a "Miller" stamp on the back. The regulator is designed for argon or argon/CO2 blend. Not recommended for straight CO2. The regulator has a barb fitting on it that is sealed in there with some thread goo of some sort. Tried to remove it to install a threaded port in there so I could move this reg over to my TIG setup, and my "argon or CO2" reg from my TIG to the HH140. But that threaded port is in there solid. Didn't want to tweak the regulator trying to removed the threaded barb. Will head to LWS to see what I can do with it.



    Initially I was almost sold on the Everlast (Power i MIG 140E) but I decided on the HH140 over the Everlast for a few reasons:

    1. Very nice manual, lots of good information, diagrams, and replacement part numbers listed. I like this sort of stuff. To me, it shows that if the company takes the time and effort to put out this detailed stuff in a manual (which can be hard to write good and stuff about technical stuff...and stuff), then they likely take the time to put this level of attention in their machines.
    2. The welding guide on the spool door (and in manual). I didn't think this would that helpful, but, the more I thought about this, the more I realized how useful it is. It lists a good starting point for many different wire types and sizes (flux and solid) that can be dialed in quickly, ie 3-45 (Volt tap-WFS). The HH has WFS numbers all around the dial which makes for a good, quick visual reference, whereas the Everlast only has "0" and "10", with no numbers in-between. Even though the HH has voltage taps (1-5), I didn't see this as a problem. Again, the Everlast (Power iMIG 140E) on has "0" and "10" with no numbers in-between which to me would not be as quick to setup for a weld on material that I hadn't done a million times already. After doing a bit of reading about voltage levels and WFS (which controls current), I felt more confident about using the voltage taps.

    Lincoln actually has some great references on voltage and current at these two sites: http://www.lincolnelectric.com/en-ca...ge-output.aspx and http://www.lincolnelectric.com/en-us...netration.aspx

    3. Parts availability, local help and Hobart customer service. Both LWS (Local Welding Suppliers) in town are authorized dealers. Also heard great things about Hobart customer service.
    4. Heavy duty. I have the Chinese TIG AHP 200, and decided to go with something a little more robust and higher quality. You know, to balance it out.

    Another nice thing about this machine is that it has the same footprint (and height) as the HH210 MVP (minus 20 lbs.). So, if (who am I kidding here...when) I ever decide to upgrade to the 210MVP, it will fit whatever cart/weld spot I have setup for the HH140. But for now, I think this machine will fit in great along with my 200A TIG, as I mostly use them for smaller hobby/home stuff.
    AHP AlphaTIG-200X
    Miller Multimatic 215

  8. #158
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    155

    Re: 110 volt migs

    I have a HH 140EZ that i use alot. It can burn the paint off the back side of 1/4" steel if I need a really good weld...just not very long

  9. #159
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    332

    Re: 110 volt migs

    For you maybe but for others it suits there needs.

  10. #160
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    tenneessee
    Posts
    6

    Re: 110 volt migs

    hey njmm313 is your campbell hausfeld the 105 Name:  51731890_2497911366902988_8264368546180497408_o.jpg
Views: 92
Size:  179.0 KB if so can you take alook inside of yours and give me some information

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