Home made tools! - Page 11
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  1. #251
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    sierra mountains
    Posts
    110

    Re: Home made tools!

    Nice body hoist.Doesn't the body tend to tip sideways with that hoisting setup?
    I admit that it is handy for one man ,but I would prefer a comalong at all four corners so it woudn't want to roll side to side.
    tractor,loader.dozer,backhoe,and all the tools to keep em movin

  2. #252
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Pensacola , Fla
    Posts
    937

    Re: Home made tools!

    HI
    yes it will tilt to one side or the other but a simple push down on the high side levels it right out. There are pullys on the x bars for the cable to roll on and the 2 come-a-longs are hooked to oposite sides and this helps keep it level too. With 2 come-a-longs that keeps to cost down and less work to raise or lower the hoist.

    have fun
    Tom

  3. #253
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    129

    Re: Home made tools!

    Here is something I made to use at work a while back. I work maintenance at a large hospital for almost 20 years now. We have 26 elevators that are unfortunately always breaking down and getting passengers stuck and it is my job to get them out whenever that happens.

    We have "one" elevator door key that is kept in the shop for emergencies but the problem is the place is so big that whenever someone gets stuck in a car, I'm half a mile away from the shop to get the key. I asked for a key of my own but to no avail so I decided to make one. It didn't look that complicated but having no milling machine or lathe I did the best I could.

    I will say that it is not the prettiest thing but it is functional.

    Tonight I made another one. I was trying to improve on the first one. I used a hacksaw to cut the links, a file to make the cuts, a drill press for the holes and a hammer for the roll pins and that's it. It is made of 3/8 steel roll bar.

    Just a brief explanation as to what this key does. On an elevator there is the "hoistway door" (the door you see in the corridor) and a car door (the door you see attached to the car from the inside). When a car gets stuck and has to be opened manually, the power is shut off so you don't end up fighting the car door motor and then this key (limited to certain kinds of elevators only) is inserted into the hole at the top of the hoistway door. As you insert it, the first link drops down and then as you continue, the second link drops down as well. (The reason for the two links is due to the distance between the two car doors. If it was one link only, the key would not fit in the door and would be stuck on the car door upon insertion.) Once the key is inserted with both links dropped down, the handle is slowly rotated either clockwise or counter clockwise depending on the type of car. The end of the key then makes contact with and lifts a "flag" that is attached to a metal rod. The rod gets lifted and the door restrictor gets lifted up and the hoistway and car door can then be forcibly opened to get the passengers out.

    Here are some pics. The first one is of the old one on top and the new one I just built under it.



    This next pic shows the two links.



    This is the two links. They are joined together with a roll pin. (sorry for the crappy pic)



    Another example of the articulation.



    Thanks for looking.

    Some day with a milling machine I'll do better.
    Last edited by Tim M; 08-18-2010 at 01:37 AM.

  4. #254
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Victoria, BC
    Posts
    2,096

    Re: Home made tools!

    Gotta love metal working! Nice key!
    200amp Air Liquide MIG, Hypertherm Plasma, Harris torches, Optrel helmet, Makita angle grinders, Pre-China Delta chop saw and belt sander, Miller leathers, shop made jigs etc, North- welders backpack.

  5. #255
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    236

    Re: Home made tools!

    Heres a nail bender I made. Pretty self explainatory. I have to bend alot of nails at work for art pieces.

    The piece the nail bends around is shaped sort of like a horn on a horse riding saddle so the nail doesnt slip off the top.
    Attached Images Attached Images    

  6. #256
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Victoria, BC
    Posts
    2,096

    Re: Home made tools!

    Quote Originally Posted by Skeluhtor View Post
    Heres a nail bender I made. Pretty self explainatory. I have to bend alot of nails at work for art pieces.

    The piece the nail bends around is shaped sort of like a horn on a horse riding saddle so the nail doesnt slip off the top.
    It's an ugly ba$tard.I like it!!!!!!!
    200amp Air Liquide MIG, Hypertherm Plasma, Harris torches, Optrel helmet, Makita angle grinders, Pre-China Delta chop saw and belt sander, Miller leathers, shop made jigs etc, North- welders backpack.

  7. #257
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Pensacola , Fla
    Posts
    937

    Re: Home made tools!

    Wow
    I though (nail bender) that you were info torture. Happy you posted a picture.
    I am always amazed with someone who can take a pile of small things and end up with a work of art. I can see things with my minds eye but they are simple compared to what is done by artists.
    How about posting some pictures of your work??

    Have fun
    Tom

  8. #258
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    minnesota
    Posts
    124

    Re: Home made tools!

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim M View Post
    Here is something I made to use at work a while back. I work maintenance at a large hospital for almost 20 years now. We have 26 elevators that are unfortunately always breaking down and getting passengers stuck and it is my job to get them out whenever that happens.

    We have "one" elevator door key that is kept in the shop for emergencies but the problem is the place is so big that whenever someone gets stuck in a car, I'm half a mile away from the shop to get the key. I asked for a key of my own but to no avail so I decided to make one. It didn't look that complicated but having no milling machine or lathe I did the best I could.

    I will say that it is not the prettiest thing but it is functional.

    Tonight I made another one. I was trying to improve on the first one. I used a hacksaw to cut the links, a file to make the cuts, a drill press for the holes and a hammer for the roll pins and that's it. It is made of 3/8 steel roll bar.

    Just a brief explanation as to what this key does. On an elevator there is the "hoistway door" (the door you see in the corridor) and a car door (the door you see attached to the car from the inside). When a car gets stuck and has to be opened manually, the power is shut off so you don't end up fighting the car door motor and then this key (limited to certain kinds of elevators only) is inserted into the hole at the top of the hoistway door. As you insert it, the first link drops down and then as you continue, the second link drops down as well. (The reason for the two links is due to the distance between the two car doors. If it was one link only, the key would not fit in the door and would be stuck on the car door upon insertion.) Once the key is inserted with both links dropped down, the handle is slowly rotated either clockwise or counter clockwise depending on the type of car. The end of the key then makes contact with and lifts a "flag" that is attached to a metal rod. The rod gets lifted and the door restrictor gets lifted up and the hoistway and car door can then be forcibly opened to get the passengers out.

    Here are some pics. The first one is of the old one on top and the new one I just built under it.



    This next pic shows the two links.
    Nice job! Thats funny about a year ago I was looking the the junk at the local halk shop and saw the strange tool and told the guy that he might as well give it to me because he would never sell and he did. Now I know what it is.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    I always tried to work with the oldest hand on the job to gain knowlege but now I can't find any.

  9. #259
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    236

    Re: Home made tools!

    Quote Originally Posted by acourtjester View Post
    Wow
    I though (nail bender) that you were info torture. Happy you posted a picture.
    I am always amazed with someone who can take a pile of small things and end up with a work of art. I can see things with my minds eye but they are simple compared to what is done by artists.
    How about posting some pictures of your work??

    Have fun
    Tom
    I work for an artist he does all the fine art and I do all the mass production pieces. I signed an agreement stateing I wouldnt steal or share his ideas so I cant really post the work or alot of the jigs I make. I figured that one would be non descript enough. I may post some of my own stuff in the future but like I said im not the artist so it porbably wont be much to look at

  10. #260
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Northern Cal., Shasta County
    Posts
    8,956

    Jig to Cut Small Piece/Parts

    on my band saw..

    A simple piece of angle with a bridge welded across the bottom. Your first cut cuts the angle but the bridge holds it all together. Drilled and counter sunk for self centering every time you mount it up. The deck is of course drilled and tapped.

    Make sure it gets mounted so the back of the angle acts as a back stop for the cut, ie., the cut of the blade pulls the piece against the angle. That's one of the things that allows you to cut very small pieces with minimal clamping. The other thing is that the piece is supported immediately on both sides of the cut.

    If the birdge piece is heavy enough you wouldn't necessarily need the jig supported on both sides if you wanted to only suspend it beyond the conventional table for a couple of inches.
    Attached Images Attached Images      
    "The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life." -Theodore Roosevelt

  11. #261
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Northern Cal., Shasta County
    Posts
    8,956

    Pre Made Shop Aid

    Here's something that really isn't a tool but sure works handy for me. I use just about everything there is as a drilling lube/coolant and soluable oil is one of those things. I don't use a coolant tank and pump, I just have the ACE hardware squirt bottles all over the place. Found myself refilling the bottles frequently in the last week or so and thought I'd show my hadny dispensor jug. Snagged it from the lil woman when she finished with it.

    A detergent dispensor bottle with a handy push button. No drips, no spills, no errors. Mix a batch of soluable oil and get several easy squirt jug fills. Put the squirt jug under the spigot, push the little button and filler 'er up. This one is a couple of years old and hasn't started cracking or crumbling yet.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    "The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life." -Theodore Roosevelt

  12. #262
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    63

    Re: Pre Made Shop Aid

    Quote Originally Posted by Sandy View Post
    Here's something that really isn't a tool but sure works handy for me. I use just about everything there is as a drilling lube/coolant and soluable oil is one of those things. I don't use a coolant tank and pump, I just have the ACE hardware squirt bottles all over the place. Found myself refilling the bottles frequently in the last week or so and thought I'd show my hadny dispensor jug. Snagged it from the lil woman when she finished with it.

    A detergent dispensor bottle with a handy push button. No drips, no spills, no errors. Mix a batch of soluable oil and get several easy squirt jug fills. Put the squirt jug under the spigot, push the little button and filler 'er up. This one is a couple of years old and hasn't started cracking or crumbling yet.
    I use the same thing at work for the mag drill.

  13. #263
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    4,780

    Re: Home made tools!

    Tools are what we use to get the job done, right? This job required a stand to hold my poster, while I made my class presentation..."Unaccustomed as I am to public speaking, of course!"
    Attached Images Attached Images      
    City of L.A. Structural; Manual & Semi-Automatic;
    "Surely there is a mine for silver, and a place where gold is refined. Iron is taken from the earth, and copper is smelted from ore."
    Job 28:1,2

    Lincoln, Miller, Victor & ISV Bible

    Danny

  14. #264
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    169

    Re: Home made tools!

    New Toy. This 20-ton press was made by a friend for a friend. I'm making one along the same lines but thought I'd share in the meantime.

    The jack is a Harbor Frieght 20-ton Air-Over-Hydraulic Jack that normally sells for $109 but can sometimes be had on sale fo $89.

    My friends and I, hobby bladsmiths, needed something to help with making Damacus Blanks. For a couple hundred bucks it hard to beat!


  15. #265
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    75

    Re: Home made tools!

    Just an uneducated guess, but those bolts look a little light weight for a 20 Tonne ... my 20 came with 2 1" bolts for each corner of the frame, and they were custom made with long shoulders and no threads in the shear zone...
    I googled the shear strength of a bolt and came up with a number like 830lbs for a 3/8th.. 5890lbs for a 1" (grade 2 bolts) (5890x4 = 23,560lbs) that even sounds under rated to me but I'm sure someone on here has a better idea on what a grade 5 bolt can take...
    Never argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level, then beat you with years of experience.

  16. #266
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    169

    Re: Home made tools!

    Quote Originally Posted by pandinus View Post
    Just an uneducated guess, but those bolts look a little light weight for a 20 Tonne ... my 20 came with 2 1" bolts for each corner of the frame, and they were custom made with long shoulders and no threads in the shear zone...
    I googled the shear strength of a bolt and came up with a number like 830lbs for a 3/8th.. 5890lbs for a 1" (grade 2 bolts) (5890x4 = 23,560lbs) that even sounds under rated to me but I'm sure someone on here has a better idea on what a grade 5 bolt can take...
    I thought (and said) pretty much the same thing. However, I watched my friend forge several Damascus blade from cable and a couple other blades with this press last Friday and Saturday. It worked without any problems. I went back and 'Googled' Bolt Grades (these are 1/2" diameter grade 5) and any grade over Grade 1/Low Carbon would be adquate (ASTM,SAE, ISO mechanical properties)

    Still, on the one I'm building I'll weld the top crossbar and use grade 8 just to be sure.

  17. #267
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Pensacola , Fla
    Posts
    937

    Re: Home made tools!

    Here is a small handle I made for hydraulic jack release valves.
    Easy to make and very handy.
    have fun
    Tom
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  18. #268
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    169

    Re: Home made tools!

    Quote Originally Posted by acourtjester View Post
    Here is a small handle I made for hydraulic jack release valves.
    Easy to make and very handy.
    have fun
    Tom
    And Timely! We've been thinking of ways to make operating the release valve easier. Holding a hot piece of steel in one hand and operating the air valve with the other makes opening the hydraulic release valve challenging. We've fabricated a foot pedal for the air valve and are planning a longer handle for the release valve. Your handle, particularly with the set screw is just what we need! Making the 'T' part longer so we can just push up or down with an arm or elbow rather than turn will fingers will also help. The valve seems to work adequately with just 1/4 or 1/2 turn.

  19. #269

    Re: Home made tools!

    hows it goin all. heres a tool i knocked up to adapt my 1/2" torque wrench to the one way clutch on a briggs and stratton horizontal engine.
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  20. #270
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    67

    Re: Home made tools!

    here's a pulling tool i made to pull the rear main seal out on my subaru engine

    ~Justin

    Manufacturing Engineer

    WWU Vehicle Research Institute c/o 2010

  21. #271
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    169

    Re: Home made tools! - My MinI-Press

    Well, I did it! I built my very own mini-press. I used mosty some scrap steel I had around and purchased about $40 of additional scrap steel from my local steel supplier.

    A spool of .030 Mig Wire, 1/4 tank of Argon/CO2, a couple of 1/2" Grade 8 bolts and several hours of cutting, welding, grinding, drilling and painting and voila,
    a working 20 TOm Air over Hydraulic Press.


    My press features a couple of innovations - first a extendable tools support and second, a quick change die feature.

    Here's some photos. (I've also include a cost list and a schematic for anyone interested it making their own').

    My Press



    Quick Change Die Holder on Top Anvil. Simple slide one side of the base of the die under the retaining bar
    then slide the other side back under the opposite retaining bar and center. I also use a small magnet to keep the die from moving.



    Tool Rest



    Tool Rest - Up Position



    'T' Handle



    'T' Handle close-up, Tenson pins and set screws and Jack Retaining Pin



    Jack Rear Hold-Down



    Die/Tool Tray



    After building my Mini-Press I was asked if I could build another by a friend. But first he wanted an estimate of the cost and
    since I’d made mine mostly of stuff I had on hand (scrap), I got a quote from my local steel supplier (column 1),
    and then figure the cost based on substituting ¼” plate for the 3/8” plated I’d used for the bottom of the base. I also figured the cost of using
    some 3/8” scrap plate (a lot less expensive than a new cut piece even if I have to scab weld a couple of pieces together).

    As you can see, the only major cost would be the 3/8” plate I used for the bottom of the base.

    Add into the cost a 2lb spool of .030 MIG wire and maybe ¼ tank of MIG gas (Argon/CO2) plus 8 or 10 4” metal cut-off wheels
    and a couple of Grade 8 bolts and you should be able to build one for under $200. Not too bad.

    Here are the material cost for my Mini-Press.

    I couldn't get the columns formatted so here's the key.
    Column 1 - Quantity/Description, Column (2) Quote for new Steel, Column (3) Substitute 1/4" Plate for 3/8" plate, Column (4) Substitute scrap 3/8" plate for new

    Description Quote 1/4" Plate Scrap 3/8

    Quantity (2) - 2”x2”x1/4” 24” lengths steel tubing (A36) or mild steel $23.80 $23.80 $23.80
    Quantity (4) - 2”x2”x1/4” 10” lengths steel tubing (A36) or mild steel $ 20.83 $20.8 $ 20.83
    Quantity (2) - 2”x2”x1/4” 8” lengths steel tubing (A36) or mild steel $8.92 $8.92 $8.92
    Quantity (1) - 3/8” x 16”x10-1/2” sheet (mild steel) $83.35 $12.00 $20.00
    Quantity (1) - ¼” x 8”x10 sheet steel (mild steel) $5.95 $5.95 $5.95
    Quantity (2) - 3/8” x 12”x3” sheet steel (mild steel) $6.90 $6.90 $6.90
    Quantity (2) - ¼”” x 12”x3” sheet steel (mild steel) $4.60 $4.60 $4.60
    Cuts $14.00 $14.00 $14.00
    Subtotals $141.57 $70.22 $78.22

    Air over Hydraulic Jack- Harbor Freight Sales Price $86.71 $86.71 $86.71
    Totals $228.28 $156.93 $164.93



    My only concern with building this press was securing the two uprights to the base.
    These uprights will bear the brunt of the jack pressure. To make sure they were adequately welded I first beveled all four sides of the bottoms of the uprights.
    I then cranked up my Millermatic 175 (220v MIG welder) to the max for .030 wire. It will weld up to ¼” single pass but even though I beveled the bottoms of the uprights,
    I still ran two heavy weld beads on three sides of the uprights. I only ran one bead on the inside of the uprights so as not to interfere
    with the 2”x2’x1/4” square tubing that makes up the bulk of the base.
    I then welded the four 10” long 2”x2’x1/4” square tubing to the 3/8” thick bottom plate. Then I welded the sides of the uprights to the outer 2”x2’x1/4” square tubing
    and a bead across the top intersection of the upright and the 2”x2’x1/4” square tubing base.
    I welded on the ¼” top plate to the 2”x2’x1/4” square tubing base and then welded the upright to that plate.
    In all there are eight separate welds that secure the uprights to the base assembly.

    I also used 3/8” thick plate 3” x 12” for the side supports on the top anvil/die holder and secure the anvil to the uprights with ½” Grade 8 4” bolts.
    The bolts were perfect in that the threads were outside of the supports.

    I’ve spent a couple hours using the press to make some ‘cable Damascus’ billets from ¾” steel cable.
    After a close inspection I can find no evidence on any problem. No part on the press shows any signs of wear of fatigue.

    Since I suspected I would be making more than one I started out by putting together a schematic to follow.
    I also added a tool rest (not included in the schematic) that has already come in handy. I also took the advice of making a long ‘T’ handle.
    I removed the original pin and substituted a tension pin and a couple of #10 set screws.
    I also add 1” sides to the outer part on one side of the base to hold my extra dies. And finally, just for appearance sake, I boxed in the base with 2”x8’ strips of1/8” plate.

    Schematic:


  22. #272
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    169

    Re: Home made tools!

    repost

  23. #273
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Springfield Or
    Posts
    120

    Re: Home made tools!

    http://i884.photobucket.com/albums/a...r/378dc9d6.jpg

    Couple of spatter scrapers I made

    Hope the link works.

  24. #274
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    195

    Re: Home made tools!

    Making cams from hand held grinders and a block of steel:






  25. #275
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,898

    Re: Home made tools!

    Quote Originally Posted by gow589 View Post
    Making cams from hand held grinders and a block of steel:






    Now that is interesting. Would you mind on elaborating what the cams are for and how you grind them? I can think of several things I would use single cams for, but I can't picture making them the way you have pictured. Need more photos.

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