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  1. #176
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    270

    Re: Home made tools!

    agreed.....that's a nice mini bead roller. Where did you find the dies that small for your bead roller? or did you machine them on a lathe?

  2. #177
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Stevens Point, WI
    Posts
    4,688

    Re: Home made tools!

    The big die was from my old bead roller 2" diameter. The small die is actually a bead welded on the hardened shaft and than filed down using the drill press (before I had the metal lathe). It took about 3 hours to build up the weld and file it down to a uniform smooth bead.

    Once I got the bead filed down I set up a vise with a stone to finish off the bead.

    Now that I do have a metal lathe I may go back and refine some stuff a little more if I ever get the time. But I doubt that will happen with all the stuff I have going on all the time.

  3. #178
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    18

    Re: Home made tools!

    anyone got any hints on quick 'n' dirty heat treating, specifically case hardening? My chipping hammer keeps getting borrowed and misused in our shop at school, so I'm about ready to make a better one for my own use. I would guess that the torches at our cutting tables should get things hot enough; only I want to keep a nice hard edge on a softer (and heavier) head. Some say I can do that with sugar (?), others recommend old motor oil. In either case, there's only so much I could bring to school at one time.

    Ideas?

  4. #179
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    283

    Re: Home made tools!

    Quote Originally Posted by VPT View Post
    My latest tool I built just to contribute to the thread.

    I got tired of fighting with my old cheap bead roller that could only roll 2.250" pipe and bigger. It was hard to get strait rolls with it, it was heavy, and just plain hard to work with.

    So I built a new roller that does perfect strait rolls easily. It does perfect end spacing every time and can roll pipes down to 1". It is smaller, much much lighter, and just plain awesome! I did quite a few test pieces, some aluminum, mild steel, and stainless. The stainless piece pictured is thick .090" exhaust piping and it rolled it no problem. The small piece is a section of shift rod out of a honda that is also about .090" and also rolled without a problem. There has been many times that I could not roll smaller BOV piping and either had to weld a bead or find another way to keep hoses on in high boost cars. Now I should never have that problem again!






    What's inside? I'd like to make a copy if you don't mind.

    Jim
    Cut an MGB and widened 11" C4 Corvette suspension and LT1 Chevrolet power & 6 spd. Pictures here:
    Part 1
    http://forum.britishv8.org/read.php?13,7581
    Part 2
    http://forum.britishv8.org/read.php?13,22422

  5. #180
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,898

    Re: Home made tools!

    Here is a socket I "fixed" in order to remove rusty and hard to reach wing nuts.




    Here is a preheater head that I made. I don't remember if I have posted this one.


  6. #181
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    90

    Re: Home made tools!

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Young View Post
    Here is a socket I "fixed" in order to remove rusty and hard to reach wing nuts.


    Thats neat, a drive dog.!

    I used an old pipe vice , some plywood with fiberglass and resin to cobble up a poor mans pipe notcher. Worked great.
    Attached Images Attached Images    

  7. #182
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Marlborough, The Peoples Republik of MA
    Posts
    3,560

    Re: Home made tools!

    Quote Originally Posted by denrep View Post
    I was doing some tool sorting, when I stumbled into this shop-built pusher tool:
    Attachment 33118
    The lower picture shows sort of how it works.

    It's for separating the rings that hold an OTR tire.

    I quickly cobbled it together from a single gear puller jaw, and some stray screws.
    Not much rhyme or reason behind the tool's mismatched components; other than that they would work together, and were available in the junk drawer the day this tool was built.

    Good Luck
    The pain, nothing like a 5 piece rim, and a loaded tire.
    Disclaimer; "I am just an a$$hole welder, don't take it personally ."

  8. #183
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Marlborough, The Peoples Republik of MA
    Posts
    3,560

    Re: Home made tools!

    My small circle cutter



    I will get pix of my big one tomorrow.
    Disclaimer; "I am just an a$$hole welder, don't take it personally ."

  9. #184
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Pensacola , Fla
    Posts
    937

    Re: Home made tools!

    HI
    Here are some tools I made to work on GM trans (700r4, TM350 )
    the silver one on the left is to pull the pump out of the trans.
    the red in the middle is to compress the clutch in the end of the trans.
    the silver on the right is to compress the clutch packs.
    the big round clamp is to align the pump housing for assembly.
    the little silver thing with the 2 loops is to tuck the rubber seals in the clutch pistons
    I also built a clamp for the trans body to fit on my engine stand so I could rotate it.

    have fun
    tom
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  10. #185
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    90

    Re: Home made tools!

    Very very nice self machined fixtures, you're hired.!

  11. #186
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    2,155

    Re: Home made tools!

    If anyone ever had to change a water pump on an old 6.9 IDI while 2,000 miles from home they might know what these are for:






    I know they are crude but all I had to work with was an O/A and a grinder that an old timer in Vermont let me use.

  12. #187
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Stony Plain, AB, Canada
    Posts
    82

    Re: Home made tools!

    Looks like this thread will never die.
    Here are a few small tools that i have made through the years.
    The first one is a number of different aircraft jacking adapters.
    The 2nd is a tool for stretching the bungees on a piper retractable landing gear
    The 3rd is for adjusting Twin Engine Cessna lannding gear
    4th Used to tighten the oil filter adapter on some Continental engines.
    5th is to hold the push rod tube springs while you install them.
    Attached Images Attached Images      

  13. #188
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Stony Plain, AB, Canada
    Posts
    82

    Re: Home made tools!

    This last one is for doing the internal timing on an aircraft magneto
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  14. #189

    Re: Home made tools!

    Quote Originally Posted by reefera4m View Post
    Not a home made tools but a home made tool rack (socket rack). Just a little something I’m making for the tool set I got my son for graduation. Using 1’ wide 1/8” thick mild steel flat bar I welded two rectangles 11” x 16” (16’ is the length of the socket holders) x 6 spaced 2” apart. I then drilled and tapped holes for the bolt studs, threaded ¾" lengths of threaded rod through the holes and welded the studs on the back side. Ground the welds flat and smooth so the rack would lie flat in a tool chest drawer. The socket holders are held in place by wing nuts to facilitate easy removal – in case you want to take some with you. Each rack holds 6 socket holders, each socket holder will hold between 15 and 20 sockets, depending on size. The rack is heavy enough when combined with the weight of the sockets so that you can remove a single socket without the rack coming with it. One is already primed and painted , #2 goes to paint tomorrow. Fits nicely in a tool chest drawer. Fist rack for SAE (standard measure) sockets, the second one is for the metric. Maybe one for the deep socket next - different design to fit in drawer.
    I like that socket holder idea. Good design for tools ! Looking forward to learning a lot from you guys.
    Last edited by supperwood; 02-03-2010 at 05:40 AM.

  15. #190
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ningi, Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    191

    Re: Home made tools!

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Warner View Post
    I've made a few things:

    A knife with differential heat treatment:
    Nice knife
    Miller Auto Invision 456 + S-62 wire feeder
    C6240B1 Gap bed lathe
    16 ft3 air compressor
    16 speed pedestal drill
    Hafco BS-912 Bandsaw

  16. #191
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    68

    Re: Home made tools!

    simple mod to a flarenut wrench wrench for brake hoses:





    a brake drum puller based on a harbor freight 3-jaw puller:






  17. #192
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    barbourville ky
    Posts
    43

    Re: Home made tools!

    here is a die i made today to bend 1/4" flat bar using a hf bender. and a pic of the circle cutter for the tourch..

    IMG]http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd273/riverrat25/benderdie.jpg[/IMG]








  18. #193
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ningi, Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    191

    Re: Home made tools! Tree and Bamboo root cutter

    I had to make this tool for my property to cut out small tree roots and stumps and also to remove sections of bamboo for propagation. It is made from a 39mm trailer axle and a piece of 50mm (4mm thick) SHS steel tube and the cutting tip is from 2 pieces of leaf spring from a small truck welded together to make the width. (120 x200mm), the tip is slightly curved for added strength when levering, the first one I made was from 10mm mild plate steel and it bent like a banana when I used it. So I only use leaf spring steel now about 6-7mm thick.

    This is a heavy tool and weighs about 23Kg in total.The (axle) pounder which drives the cutting tip goes inside the tube is 15kg and the cutting tip and tube is 8kg. Tube length is 95cm and finished axle length with one stub is 1.5mt.

    To use, put the tip over where you want to cut the bamboo or tree root, lift the axle up in the tube about 3/4 of the way and then shove down. The 15kg axle forces the cutting tip to slice in to the root, keep repeating till cut through. To remove a small tree you can go around the tree severing the main roots, and then you can lift up the axle about half way and use the extra length for more leverage to help lift up the stump.

    To build, I cut off 1 end of the axle with about 75mm past the coned shape. ie; (that becomes a stub axle). That remaining 75mm square axle on it is placed inside the SHS and gets welded flush to where the coned section starts. It also provides the hammer surface at the bottom inside the tube. The coned sectiion of that stub axle gets cut in half lengthways and the welded trailer springs section get welded to it, they then get ground down to a cutting point including the sides.

    The axle needs a small grind length ways on one side to miss the 50mm SHS inside weld joint, also will need to grind a radius on the 4 corners of the axle to fit the corner radius of the SHS, a bit of rubber/foam for a handle for hand protection from the pounding and your good to go. You will also need earmuffs. The pounding sound gets funnelled up towards your ears. You can put some sort of roundish knob on the threaded handle (stub) but I didn't bother.

    This is a heavy piece of equipment to use and you will need to be reasonable strong to do more than a few minutes of work but 5 minutes with this can be the same as 30-45 minutes with an axe or pick, especially good on bamboo where you want to cut a piece of section out and the culms make it impossible to use an axe as they get in the way.
    Attached Images Attached Images     
    Miller Auto Invision 456 + S-62 wire feeder
    C6240B1 Gap bed lathe
    16 ft3 air compressor
    16 speed pedestal drill
    Hafco BS-912 Bandsaw

  19. #194
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    barbourville ky
    Posts
    43

    Re: Home made tools! Tree and Bamboo root cutter

    Quote Originally Posted by Ed. View Post
    I had to make this tool for my property to cut out small tree roots and stumps and also to remove sections of bamboo for propagation. It is made from a 39mm trailer axle and a piece of 50mm (4mm thick) SHS steel tube and the cutting tip is from 2 pieces of leaf spring from a small truck welded together to make the width. (120 x200mm), the tip is slightly curved for added strength when levering, the first one I made was from 10mm mild plate steel and it bent like a banana when I used it. So I only use leaf spring steel now about 6-7mm thick.

    This is a heavy tool and weighs about 23Kg in total.The (axle) pounder which drives the cutting tip goes inside the tube is 15kg and the cutting tip and tube is 8kg. Tube length is 95cm and finished axle length with one stub is 1.5mt.

    To use, put the tip over where you want to cut the bamboo or tree root, lift the axle up in the tube about 3/4 of the way and then shove down. The 15kg axle forces the cutting tip to slice in to the root, keep repeating till cut through. To remove a small tree you can go around the tree severing the main roots, and then you can lift up the axle about half way and use the extra length for more leverage to help lift up the stump.

    To build, I cut off 1 end of the axle with about 75mm past the coned shape. ie; (that becomes a stub axle). That remaining 75mm square axle on it is placed inside the SHS and gets welded flush to where the coned section starts. It also provides the hammer surface at the bottom inside the tube. The coned sectiion of that stub axle gets cut in half lengthways and the welded trailer springs section get welded to it, they then get ground down to a cutting point including the sides.

    The axle needs a small grind length ways on one side to miss the 50mm SHS inside weld joint, also will need to grind a radius on the 4 corners of the axle to fit the corner radius of the SHS, a bit of rubber/foam for a handle for hand protection from the pounding and your good to go. You will also need earmuffs. The pounding sound gets funnelled up towards your ears. You can put some sort of roundish knob on the threaded handle (stub) but I didn't bother.

    This is a heavy piece of equipment to use and you will need to be reasonable strong to do more than a few minutes of work but 5 minutes with this can be the same as 30-45 minutes with an axe or pick, especially good on bamboo where you want to cut a piece of section out and the culms make it impossible to use an axe as they get in the way.
    nics work and great idea

  20. #195
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    The armpit of NJ
    Posts
    932

    Re: Home made tools!

    I have been doing a lot of layout work, and laying out large arcs requires a decent trammel. The biggest good one I had tough enough for shop use is 12" (ancient.... part of a navigators kit from pre-WWII), so I went to the tool kit store (Harbour Fright) and picked up this cheapy aluminum caliper (24") for about $8 with sale and coupons.

    A few minutes with a die grinder to cut the grooves, a few minutes with drill and tap (including snapping the drill on one hole due to something hard in the aluminum. After I picked the drill bit out, I excavated a little on the other side out of curiosity, but it was harder than the burr. No idea how it made it through the extrusion process......) The trammel points are 1/16 tungstens, pointed 60 degrees in the lathe with the toolpost grinder (die grinder strapped down with hose clamps)

    The points are spaced 3" apart when the tool is closed, within about 0.010", which is good enough for most of the work I need it for, so I can use the factory markings for setup.
    Attached Images Attached Images    

  21. #196
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    1000 miles from nowhere........
    Posts
    449

    Re: HMT! SA200 Exciter Housing Puller

    I needed a puller to get the exciter housing off of my machine. I cut this flat bar from some .135 plate. After trying to pull, the plate bent. I went back and welded on some other strips to add rigidity. I used a two jaw puller to complete the deal. The tape is to prevent scratches on shaft.

    -Rhyno
    07 Fowler 200D
    65 RedFace
    04 Miller TB 302, 22hp
    Miller 12RC
    Miller HF 251-1
    Lincoln SP135
    HyperTherm PM 380
    and a few others...

    Quote Originally Posted by Rhyno View Post
    But, if I "all of a sudden disappear.... ...." hopefully I didn't suffer too much....

  22. #197
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    283

    Re: Home made tools!

    Quote Originally Posted by cuchulain92 View Post
    anyone got any hints on quick 'n' dirty heat treating, specifically case hardening? My chipping hammer keeps getting borrowed and misused in our shop at school, so I'm about ready to make a better one for my own use. I would guess that the torches at our cutting tables should get things hot enough; only I want to keep a nice hard edge on a softer (and heavier) head. Some say I can do that with sugar (?), others recommend old motor oil. In either case, there's only so much I could bring to school at one time.

    Ideas?
    Heat the edge you want to harden to cherry red with an oxy-acetelene torch. Turn off the oxygen and coat the hot area with soot. Turn the oxygen back on and hold it chreey red for a minute then re-soot the area. Repeat the process 3 times quenching after the last reheat cycle. I was able to get mild steel to around 38 rc using that method.
    Cut an MGB and widened 11" C4 Corvette suspension and LT1 Chevrolet power & 6 spd. Pictures here:
    Part 1
    http://forum.britishv8.org/read.php?13,7581
    Part 2
    http://forum.britishv8.org/read.php?13,22422

  23. #198
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Stony Plain, AB, Canada
    Posts
    82

    Re: Home made tools!

    Jim- What would be the best to quench in? Water or oil?

  24. #199
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    283

    Re: Home made tools!

    Quote Originally Posted by MrBill View Post
    Jim- What would be the best to quench in? Water or oil?
    I use water because it removes heat quicker. The carbon is already in the metal from the acetelene/heat cycles so all you want to do is drop the temp as quick as possible to freeze the carbon in the metal surface.
    Cut an MGB and widened 11" C4 Corvette suspension and LT1 Chevrolet power & 6 spd. Pictures here:
    Part 1
    http://forum.britishv8.org/read.php?13,7581
    Part 2
    http://forum.britishv8.org/read.php?13,22422

  25. #200
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Stony Plain, AB, Canada
    Posts
    82

    Re: Home made tools!

    Thanks Jim

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