Blacksmithing tools - Page 36
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  1. #876
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
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    B.C. Canada
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    1,115

    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by VaughnT View Post
    Well, dang! As much as I've been around big rigs, I never once thought about adding E-track to the bed of my pickup! That'll be something I need to think about after I get the bed sprayed with some of that liner stuff. Pretty brilliant idea and I'm sure it'd be handier than the dumb little tie-down loops they give you at each corner.

    That forge is sexy as sexy gets! Pressed sheet metal bodies are an interesting thing because they help us date the forge to the mid-1940's or later. How is that? Interestingly, the technology to press sheets of steel didn't exist prior to WW2. We could do it to some degree, obviously, but it was only the technological advancements brought on by the war needs that really spurred innovation in that area.

    That boost in technology made it cost-effective to press something like a forge body. Prior to that, the cheapest or most profitable way of doing it was casting iron.
    Great info on the pressed sheets, Vaughn! That would make the forge a maximum of about 80 years old.

    I installed E-track in the truck bed over a dozen years ago. I’m certain others have done similar but I never seen or heard.


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  2. #877
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    B.C. Canada
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    1,115

    Blacksmithing tools

    I sold these three blowers (individually) to pay for my “new” forge.




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  3. #878
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    617

    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Lis2323 View Post
    Great info .... make the forge a maximum of about 80 years old.
    It's a pretty interesting tidbit, I thought. If you look around, you'll see a lot of things that were once cast but then not. Everyone wants to think that manufacturers just went for the cheaper alternative in some mad dash to get wealth and power. The truth, though, is that cast iron was never the better option. It's was just the only solution we had because of technology.

    Sadly, that also spelled the doom for foundries across the world and explains why we no longer have beautiful tools. When you had to go through all the effort to make moulds for casting legs for your lathes and mills and such, you could easily make them beautiful. Curves worked just as well as straight lines because the iron would flow like water.

    When you're making legs out of sheets of steel, however, straight lines and simple angles become the norm for no other reason than it maximizes what you can get out of the material and is within the limits of what machines can cut, bend, rivet and weld.

    One simple change in the material used means the whole world is changed. A butterfly flaps its wings....

  4. #879
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    2,321

    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Lis2323 View Post
    Great info on the pressed sheets, Vaughn! That would make the forge a maximum of about 80 years old.

    I installed E-track in the truck bed over a dozen years ago. I’m certain others have done similar but I never seen or heard.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    I didn't know that pressed steel was a WWII thing either. I did come across an antique furniture dealer that had E track in 2 rows in his enclosed trailer... worked slick for tying things down solid. I should have had it in my truck too, before the front got bent.
    F-225 amp Forney AC Stick
    230 amp Sears AC Stick
    Lincoln 180C MIG
    Victor Medalist 350 O/A

    Les

  5. #880
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    1,115

    Re: Blacksmithing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by whtbaron View Post
    I didn't know that pressed steel was a WWII thing either. I did come across an antique furniture dealer that had E track in 2 rows in his enclosed trailer... worked slick for tying things down solid. I should have had it in my truck too, before the front got bent.
    The only antique in my truck is me.
    :

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