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  1. #26
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Hi,just joined not too long ago but I've got about 45 years in it.The videos are great.You're never too old to learn,I guess.Do a lot of cutting and am about to switch to propane.Usually between 7 to 10 on the acet.Bought a couple of tips for my Victor 300 today,gonna get the tank off the BBQ grill tomorrow.If anybody has any helpfull info I'd appreciate it.Really good vids!

  2. #27
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    the preheat will take just a tad longer, but once you get the cut going, travel speed is so close you won't notice a difference. The cut also is as high of quality as the acetylene. We use propane on the cutting table but we still use o/a for all the hand torches. One day we will change all of them over. I use both at the house. I would take the acetylene tanks off the truck and finish them out at the house and when I run out I use propane to carry me over. I didn't like running with partial tanks on a truck if I could help it. I have noticed lately a few guys running everything off of propane. they are using propane to run their welders and cutting needs.

  3. #28
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Young View Post
    the preheat will take just a tad longer, but once you get the cut going, travel speed is so close you won't notice a difference. The cut also is as high of quality as the acetylene. We use propane on the cutting table but we still use o/a for all the hand torches. One day we will change all of them over. I use both at the house. I would take the acetylene tanks off the truck and finish them out at the house and when I run out I use propane to carry me over. I didn't like running with partial tanks on a truck if I could help it. I have noticed lately a few guys running everything off of propane. they are using propane to run their welders and cutting needs.
    Appreciate the reply.A lot of guys I know are doing the same thing.Mostly work out of the home shop anymore,all critical tig,About to hang it up and do my own stuff.Always loved working with o/a,it's just getting really expensive for the acet.Already have T hoses,but I don't think it matters,the acetone is in the acet,not the propane.This forum is a load of good info,I clicked on this thread cause I thought it was a joke,turned out to be really interesting.Thanks for your help.panhead201

  4. #29
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Quote Originally Posted by mla2ofus View Post
    Wayne, you've covered more ground on how to use a cutting torch w/ this thread on this site than I've seen since joining.
    Mike
    Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Young View Post
    Your video "Adjusting a cutting torch and other tricks 1" is the best description for setting a torch flame I have come across. At the shop I worked at a man couldn't run a torch on a money job unless he could acheive that setting. Each tip is rated for different thicknesses and like you have mentioned a single tip can be used from very thin to thick by adjusting the preheat and O2 pressure but your loose that cherry spot where the flame lengthens and has the little whipping sound when the O2 is pressed. The absolutely best cuts come from when a flame and tip are in that cherry spot.

    I was responsible for teaching all the new guys the ropes on cutting at the last shop I worked for. It was interesting to see seasoned weld hands response to the class. many were angry they had to take a cutting class. many of them could outweld me by miles but when it came to cutting blind beavers could have made prettier cuts. After the class, many of the ones that were angry at the first were making great cuts. I think mostly it was their pride being bruised alittle.

    Bracing is most important thing in cutting, and a clean tip is it's twin sister. if you can't have those two thing you won't have a good cut. I will never forget when on of the welders scare everyone by cutting a 24" diameter 3 inch thick slug and it fell though cause the cut was so clean. It was common practice to weld a pad eye on the slug to lift it out of the future manway opening. seems the welder typical had to beat with a sledge on the slug and curse at it for while before it would give up and come out. He was sitting on top of a 120" can and was just finishing his cut when the slug slipped through the opening and came crashing down on to a buggy feeder underneath. the man inside had to clean his drawers. With all the crashing and cursing we though the slug had landed on the man. After the incident write up the welder who had cut out the slug was so proud that the cut was a through and through and he didn't have to beat on the slug to get it to come out. Before anyone says the pad eye should have been welded on before the safety cuts are cut, in the welders defense, in all the years he worked there he had never ever had a fall through. ALL of his cuts were in need of a big hammer and the power of the crane to pull the slug out. You gotta love a clean cut. He was using a victor 315 with a number 4 cutting tip.

    Thanks for posting the videos.

    Wow, High praise guys. Hope it doesn't go to my head

    I can imagine it was a big deal with that much metal dropping. Bet that was real exciting.

    Quote Originally Posted by davec View Post
    This is some great stuff. I really want to thank you for taking the time to do this. As you noted, there just isn't much info out there on the details that make cutting work. I know I have a loooong way to go myself. The problem is that some of these shots need to really be zoomed in a lot more as I just can't see details (things like you describing the flame as you adjust - you can't see what the flame is doing well enough to match up with your comments).

    I don't want to take anything away from this, as I greatly appreciate the time you have spent doing this. I'm just trying to get any last bit of info I can.

    I've had good luck using the easy (and free) Windows Movie Maker in the past to stitch together multiple video clips, so that could be an option, if you are interested. Or just even some close-up shots in separate videos. I'll take anything!


    Thanks. I understand your problem with the vids. I'm still trying to find a way to get the detail I want in the flame. It's not working yet but these with the #3 filter are better than before. I may be forced to go to still photo's for the fine details since my still camera has a lot more control allowing me to change the exposure settings.

    Anyway till I get some better pics (it may be a while since we're busy right now) here's higher definition versions of the previous video. If you go to full screen they'll play in 480p. It's taken all night for them to upload.





    Quote Originally Posted by panhead201 View Post
    Appreciate the reply.A lot of guys I know are doing the same thing.Mostly work out of the home shop anymore,all critical tig,About to hang it up and do my own stuff.Always loved working with o/a,it's just getting really expensive for the acet.Already have T hoses,but I don't think it matters,the acetone is in the acet,not the propane.This forum is a load of good info,I clicked on this thread cause I thought it was a joke,turned out to be really interesting.Thanks for your help.panhead201
    You're welcome.

    I've been working toward getting a propane setup going in the shop in addition to the acetylene myself. It's been years since I've done much cutting with it but I started out with propane back when I first got my torch. I just got another incentive for getting a propane setup going in that I just got a Koike Handy Auto torch and the only tip I've got at moment is a propane tip. I plan on adding to this with vids of all the above including some manual torch attachments. It may take a while since I only have time on some weekends to do it but be patient and I'll see what I can do.
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  5. #30
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Quote Originally Posted by BlackGT97 View Post
    Do they use the term "slag" in industry? What i mean is, is the term slag, when using o/a cutting, acceptable? i learned that the correct term is Dross. Just want to know if you guys use this term when talking about oxy acetelyne cutting. You only get "slag" if you are using flux...right?
    Just call it what doesn't get you funny looks. I don't believe I ever heard it called anything but "slag" during all my years in the industry. Flux from welding was almost always called flux, as in "Let me knock the flux off". Probably a regional thing.

  6. #31
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    I was thinking this thread should be a sticky, on it's own or maybe in the existing Oxy sticky.
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  7. #32
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Thanks Too I've owned torches for prob 20 years and Just discovered I wasn't taught right or doing it right thanks
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  8. #33
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Quote Originally Posted by bigb View Post
    I was thinking this thread should be a sticky, on it's own or maybe in the existing Oxy sticky.
    I considered posting it in that thread. But that thread is so huge now that I figured it would get lost in the middle.

    Quote Originally Posted by dumb as a stump View Post
    Thanks Too I've owned torches for prob 20 years and Just discovered I wasn't taught right or doing it right thanks
    You're welcome. I won't say that it's the only way to do it but it's what works for me. I kinda figured someone would come out saying how I was doing such and such wrong so I might learn something.
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  9. #34
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Darn good thread here Irish, prolly should drag this one and the one Steve started a while back in a sticky "topic" along with some of the other super threads like "Mig like Tig" etc.

    I'd sure like to find that dumb sumb!t@h who taught all those super gas hands to shut the fuel off first when they were done...

    Matt

  10. #35
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt_Maguire View Post
    Darn good thread here Irish, prolly should drag this one and the one Steve started a while back in a sticky "topic" along with some of the other super threads like "Mig like Tig" etc.

    I'd sure like to find that dumb sumb!t@h who taught all those super gas hands to shut the fuel off first when they were done...

    Matt
    Thanks. I don't think I'm up to your level of movie prowess yet.

    It's up to the powers that be to see if it's worthy of sticky status.

    As for cutting the gas off first. I've actually seen reason to cut it off first. If for some reason you don't completely get the acetylene off it will sit there and smolder back into the torch filling the torch up with soot. I had to clean a brand new torch the other day for a customer. He came back saying the the acetylene bottle was empty but his gauge showed 175 psi. I went to tracing trying to find the plug and ended up at the torch tip. But there was soot all the way back into the valve of the torch. It completely blocked the tip with the soot. He'd only made one cut with it before this happened.

    I've done it both ways and have had the worst pops from turning the oxygen off first though it won't do it every time.
    Last edited by irish fixit; 12-09-2011 at 12:46 AM.
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  11. #36
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Something that is missed is how the torch is moved. If you watch closely the right hand is swinging the torch left and right in an arc. The left knuckle is your fulcrum. This is the IMPORTANT part: You roll your knuckle slightly to move the torch closer or farther away from you as you swing the arc with your right hand. It is very subtle but until someone points it out to novices they miss it.
    If you don't roll your knuckle you will cut an arc.
    Really good vids * slaps on back* :')

  12. #37
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Thanks a lot for that information. Helped me out a lot. Much appreciated
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  13. #38
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Quote Originally Posted by lotechman View Post
    Something that is missed is how the torch is moved. If you watch closely the right hand is swinging the torch left and right in an arc. The left knuckle is your fulcrum. This is the IMPORTANT part: You roll your knuckle slightly to move the torch closer or farther away from you as you swing the arc with your right hand. It is very subtle but until someone points it out to novices they miss it.
    If you don't roll your knuckle you will cut an arc.
    Really good vids * slaps on back* :')

    Thanks. I did cover that in at least two of the vids. I wish I could change the order since the better ones are some of the last. Looking at the downloads most people don't make it to the last video's.

    Quote Originally Posted by fordman View Post
    Thanks a lot for that information. Helped me out a lot. Much appreciated

    You're welcome.
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  14. #39
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Quote Originally Posted by lotechman View Post
    Something that is missed is how the torch is moved. If you watch closely the right hand is swinging the torch left and right in an arc. The left knuckle is your fulcrum. This is the IMPORTANT part: You roll your knuckle slightly to move the torch closer or farther away from you as you swing the arc with your right hand. It is very subtle but until someone points it out to novices they miss it.
    If you don't roll your knuckle you will cut an arc.
    Really good vids * slaps on back* :')
    I noticed Lotec's observation too. It's always interesting to see anther's M.O. isn't it?
    I use a slightly different method than a fulcrum at the knuckle, but previously didn't want to bring it up in Irish's thread. But since Lotec let the cat out...

    When I'm cutting a straight line in accessible work, I often rest the tubes of the torch on a "bridge" made of the fingers of my gloved "free" hand which is resting on the bench or the work. With the torch tubes resting on the "finger bridge" I'll then guide the torch along the cut line with push or drag from the handle end. For me, when following a line, it's usually easier to maintain smooth motion by "hinging" at my elbow and shoulder, for "steering" and travel. For me, hinging at the elbow usually allows for travel of at least a couple of feet in one continuous very smooth motion; more or less, depending on obstacles and torch design. Again, it's just another way, and a matter of personal preference.

    Nice work and videos, Irish.
    Thanks for taking the time.

    Good Luck
    Last edited by denrep; 12-09-2011 at 11:21 AM.

  15. #40
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Irish, you're a Steel Surgeon. Thank You for sharing your knowledge and experience. Thank You for taking the time to video tape and upload these clips. I've watched every one.

    This should be a sticky. I'm a member of three or four welding forums, and none of them have this information (at least I couldn't find it), but this stuff is something everyone with a torch has to learn at some point.

    What's next for video tips? Reloading ammo, smoking meat, lap dances?


  16. #41
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Wayne,

    Could you demonstrated washing welds and rivits? Before carbon arc was king O/A was all that was used. I use a scarfing tip. There are a variety of tips out there to choose from. My method of washing a weld say a fillet with a O/A is said to be backwards, but it works well for me.

    Always looking to learn more, would you mind demonstrating how you use a scarfing tip?

  17. #42
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Always looking to learn more, would you mind demonstrating how you use a scarfing tip?
    I'd like to see that too.

  18. #43
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    This thread is so great! One of the best I have read since being a member and I have been one a long time. I have learned more about getting good o/a cuts from this than I know what to do with. This morning was out on a job had to cut some pipe down and some plates and had to do NO GRINDING cuts were smooth dross popped right off and the customer noticed to. He said "damn i need you to teach me how to use a torch like that!" I just laughed and said well it takes a few years to learn...

    Thanks again Irish and any others who have posted great videos here. I too would like to see the washing techniques guys use for guaging and the like.

  19. #44
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Quote Originally Posted by denrep View Post
    I noticed Lotec's observation too. It's always interesting to see anther's M.O. isn't it?
    I use a slightly different method than a fulcrum at the knuckle, but previously didn't want to bring it up in Irish's thread. But since Lotec let the cat out...

    When I'm cutting a straight line in accessible work, I often rest the tubes of the torch on a "bridge" made of the fingers of my gloved "free" hand which is resting on the bench or the work. With the torch tubes resting on the "finger bridge" I'll then guide the torch along the cut line with push or drag from the handle end. For me, when following a line, it's usually easier to maintain smooth motion by "hinging" at my elbow and shoulder, for "steering" and travel. For me, hinging at the elbow usually allows for travel of at least a couple of feet in one continuous very smooth motion; more or less, depending on obstacles and torch design. Again, it's just another way, and a matter of personal preference.

    Nice work and videos, Irish.
    Thanks for taking the time.

    Good Luck
    You're welcome.

    Ok guys quit holding out on me. I didn't intend this thread to be one sided. I want anything to do with cutting added here. I know I've not got all the answers. I'm putting up what I've managed to figure out over the years but there's always more than one way to do it. I'm always learning new ways myself.



    Quote Originally Posted by WenValley View Post
    Irish, you're a Steel Surgeon. Thank You for sharing your knowledge and experience. Thank You for taking the time to video tape and upload these clips. I've watched every one.

    This should be a sticky. I'm a member of three or four welding forums, and none of them have this information (at least I couldn't find it), but this stuff is something everyone with a torch has to learn at some point.

    What's next for video tips? Reloading ammo, smoking meat, lap dances?

    Thanks for the compliments. You're more than welcome to learn what I can manage to teach.


    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Young View Post
    Wayne,

    Could you demonstrated washing welds and rivits? Before carbon arc was king O/A was all that was used. I use a scarfing tip. There are a variety of tips out there to choose from. My method of washing a weld say a fillet with a O/A is said to be backwards, but it works well for me.

    Always looking to learn more, would you mind demonstrating how you use a scarfing tip?
    Quote Originally Posted by farmall View Post
    I'd like to see that too.
    I'll see what I can do. Still lots of ground to cover here. Not exactly what you're talking about but we managed to finish up early today so I got a couple a quick vids of a couple of tricks. They're uploading right now so I'll post them when they're done.

    Quote Originally Posted by kburd View Post
    This thread is so great! One of the best I have read since being a member and I have been one a long time. I have learned more about getting good o/a cuts from this than I know what to do with. This morning was out on a job had to cut some pipe down and some plates and had to do NO GRINDING cuts were smooth dross popped right off and the customer noticed to. He said "damn i need you to teach me how to use a torch like that!" I just laughed and said well it takes a few years to learn...

    Thanks again Irish and any others who have posted great videos here. I too would like to see the washing techniques guys use for guaging and the like.
    You're welcome. Glad to know someone benefited from the video's.
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  20. #45
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    I don't know anything about making videos, but if someone does a scarfing video can you adjust the F stop to cut the light way down or a #4 or #5 filter. A scarfing tip tends to make a lot of bright light so I'm thinkin' it's gonna be difficult to get a vid that you can see exactly what's happening.
    Just a suggestion,
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  21. #46
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Young View Post
    Wayne,

    Could you demonstrated washing welds and rivits? Before carbon arc was king O/A was all that was used. I use a scarfing tip. There are a variety of tips out there to choose from. My method of washing a weld say a fillet with a O/A is said to be backwards, but it works well for me.

    Always looking to learn more, would you mind demonstrating how you use a scarfing tip?
    Scott, I've always worked the tip "backwards" too. It seems to keep the slag from piling up in front of the tip. It's always worked for me and it's the way I was taught by the old timers who are no doubt long gone.
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  22. #47
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Young View Post
    Wayne,

    Could you demonstrated washing welds and rivits? Before carbon arc was king O/A was all that was used. I use a scarfing tip. There are a variety of tips out there to choose from. My method of washing a weld say a fillet with a O/A is said to be backwards, but it works well for me.

    Always looking to learn more, would you mind demonstrating how you use a scarfing tip?
    ++ from me.

    Also, really good videos Irish!

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  23. #48
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Quote Originally Posted by mla2ofus View Post
    I don't know anything about making videos, but if someone does a scarfing video can you adjust the F stop to cut the light way down or a #4 or #5 filter. A scarfing tip tends to make a lot of bright light so I'm thinkin' it's gonna be difficult to get a vid that you can see exactly what's happening.
    Just a suggestion,
    Mike
    I've got my camera set for 2 stop underexposure which is the max that it will go and I'm using a #3 lens in front. I've not managed to find a small round #5 lens to go into the wire filter holder I made for my camera yet. I'm sure there's one here somewhere but I'm not sure where. I'm still working on getting this dark enough to see everything clearly. It's getting better though.

    Quote Originally Posted by mla2ofus View Post
    Scott, I've always worked the tip "backwards" too. It seems to keep the slag from piling up in front of the tip. It's always worked for me and it's the way I was taught by the old timers who are no doubt long gone.
    Mike
    I'm far from a expert at gouging myself. I've got a lot of practice at cutting welds with a standard cutting tip but for most of my life I've not had a gouging tip. I've got a few now but not a lot of experience with them. We'll see how it goes when I get to that point.

    Quote Originally Posted by wintermute View Post
    ++ from me.

    Also, really good videos Irish!

    --Wintermute
    Thanks.


    Here's a couple of video's I shot real quick at the end of the day. I wanted to get this first one before my helper went home because I was afraid it would take two people to do it properly. I was right. It's using just the oxygen jet to make a cut. I tried it without a second torch and just couldn't get it to work on such a thin piece. It might of worked on something heavier. I've not done a lot of these in my life. I have used a oxygen lance to pierce a pin before but not a lot of cuts. Anyway here it goes.



    This second one is cutting a nut off a bolt. It's a whole lot easier to get the nut off is the bolt is held firmly. Usually a chisel or simply a hammer to the side of the nut will knock it off. But I didn't have a way to hold it quickly. The method I used is to simply hit the end of the bolt and I use that a lot when I'm not wanting to save the bolts.


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  24. #49
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Wayne, the filter setup you have now works great!! No need to see what's happening around the flame, just what's happening in the flame.
    Wish we lived closer to each other. I don't consider myself expert at any metalworking, just had lots of practice at stick welding iron and O/A welding, cutting and brazing for 32 yrs. I never touched a mig 'til after I retired.
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  25. #50
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    Re: How to use a cutting torch

    Quote Originally Posted by mla2ofus View Post
    Wayne, the filter setup you have now works great!! No need to see what's happening around the flame, just what's happening in the flame.
    Wish we lived closer to each other. I don't consider myself expert at any metalworking, just had lots of practice at stick welding iron and O/A welding, cutting and brazing for 32 yrs. I never touched a mig 'til after I retired.
    Mike
    I think the filter needs to be a little bit darker. Not much but just a little more would allow more details to be seen.

    It's just 300 miles.

    I don't consider myself a expert at anything. I'm more the jack of all trades type. Something's I've got a lot of practice at but I'm still learning more all the time.
    Millermatic 252
    XMT 304's
    Dynasty 280DX
    Hypertherm PowerMax 1250
    Miller Trailblazer 302 EFI
    Optima Pulser
    XR feeder and XR Edge gun
    and more at
    http://members.dslextreme.com/users/waynecook/index.htm

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