New to the site, a few projects, and most importantly, here to learn more
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2018
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    Land of the Toxic Avenger
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    New to the site, a few projects, and most importantly, here to learn more

    Hello there.

    A few years ago, I decided to learn how to weld, as I was tired of paying other people to weld things that broke on me, at the house, or on a job I was doing for someone else. Being a self employed HIC (Home Improvement contractor), I always would come across things that needed to be fixed, but with neither the knowledge, nor the equipment to do so, I would have to pass on the repair work, throwing a few dollars away, and more importantly, not being able to learn by doing.

    So after experiencing the woes of owning a Home depot 120v flux core welder, I spent the money and bought myself a Miller 211 autoset, and have never looked back. It's really amazing the difference that a higher dollar, higher voltage unit can make while fusing a couple of pieces of metal together.

    Watching videos on Youboob, making lots of mistakes myself was how it all began. Over time, I realized I needed professional help, and I went back to the supply house to ask the guys there who they could recommend to get a few pointers from, as I just wasn't getting very far by myself. They recommended an old fella, sort of retired, who they felt had the ability to give me a hand. Gave him a call, and within a few days, he took the 45 minute drive up to my home, and spent 2 hours with me showing me the basics. I was forever grateful. He sort of had a bunch of health issues he was dealing with, and I've left him a few messages, but have not heard back. I can only assume the worst, but hoping for the best for him. He is a really great fella, and helped me tremendously.

    So my thread, being an introduction thread, is actually a place I'll put up photos of my small projects as I move along in my quest for being a better welder. Hopefully, someday, I can find another mentor to guide me even further along than I currently am. Time will tell.

    Being an old guy who loves old trucks, I drive my daily beast around that's powered by a Cummins diesel. The older Cummins motors have what is called an FSS, otherwise known as a Fuel Shutdown Solenoid. The FSS is the way that these motors were designed to turn off, and they didn't put the solenoid in the greatest place of access. I needed a wrench that could get in there, and after watching what a couple other Cummins enthusiasts had done, I decided to make my own version, with my own special touches.

    buying a Home Cheapo wrench, I whittled it down to make it fit between the FSS and the housing of the VE Pump. Now came the issue of angle and length. The stock wrench is not only too long, but it's pitch, or angle to the FSS was off a bit. I fixed that by altering the head's angle, and whittling out bits that interfere when removing the FSS. THen I shortened it to make it more manageable in the engine bay.

    Quick, fun and cheap to make. More pics after the 5 max
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    Last edited by T man; 05-13-2018 at 07:03 PM.
    T man.


    15 + years working for myself, and by golly, I still don't know what I want to do when I grow up.

  2. #2
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    Re: New to the site, a few projects, and most importantly, here to learn more

    A view of the pump with a new FSS
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Dalton, GA
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    1,509

    Re: New to the site, a few projects, and most importantly, here to learn more

    That worked out great. Isn’t it fun when your own solution works!
    Burt
    _____________________
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    10FtDrillBit.com

  4. #4
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    May 2018
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    Re: New to the site, a few projects, and most importantly, here to learn more

    Sure is. I borrowed the idea, but the cut and weld was my take on it.
    T man.


    15 + years working for myself, and by golly, I still don't know what I want to do when I grow up.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Central Coast, California
    Posts
    85

    Re: New to the site, a few projects, and most importantly, here to learn more

    Nice job. I was lucky enough to have a junior college in my area that offered a beginning welding course at night. I took the course (2 nights per week for 15 weeks) and had a great time. The beginner class did oxy/ac welding for half the class and stick welding for the other half the class. We got one day teasers for MIG and TIG. After you pass the beginner class you can take specialized classes in stick (for pipe welding certifications), MIG, or TIG. I only took the beginner class, but it gave me the foundation to learn TIG on my own (in my garage).

    Good luck and have fun!

    Dave
    2016 AHP AlphaTIG 200X
    Dave's Telescopes Page

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    207

    Re: New to the site, a few projects, and most importantly, here to learn more

    You work on stuff long enough, you end up with a drawer of wrenches like that.

  7. #7
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    Land of the Toxic Avenger
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    Re: New to the site, a few projects, and most importantly, here to learn more

    Quote Originally Posted by dmcnally View Post
    Nice job. I was lucky enough to have a junior college in my area that offered a beginning welding course at night. I took the course (2 nights per week for 15 weeks) and had a great time. The beginner class did oxy/ac welding for half the class and stick welding for the other half the class. We got one day teasers for MIG and TIG. After you pass the beginner class you can take specialized classes in stick (for pipe welding certifications), MIG, or TIG. I only took the beginner class, but it gave me the foundation to learn TIG on my own (in my garage).

    Good luck and have fun!

    Dave
    After 30 plus years of working on homes, anytime I pick up my welder, I m having fun! I even get to modify my snow plow and make repairs rebuilding it to better than new. Added extra spring hooks to the plow quadrant, which allows more snow to be pushed without flipping the blade forwards. It helps with stacking snow, and Western switched to it after this 20+ year old plow was already on the road for a decade. After it came back from the Powder Coating co., It looked brand new.

    I also made up a set of roller dollies for it that bolt on to the blade. Allows me to move around this 600 lb hunk all by myself, as getting into and out of storage was a bear before it.

    Lol
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    Last edited by T man; 05-14-2018 at 08:38 PM.
    T man.


    15 + years working for myself, and by golly, I still don't know what I want to do when I grow up.

  8. #8
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    Re: New to the site, a few projects, and most importantly, here to learn more

    Quote Originally Posted by Zimm View Post
    You work on stuff long enough, you end up with a drawer of wrenches like that.
    Even though its only been a few years, I've begun that quest.

    A few years back, I made

    Fan clutch set, and wheel bearing race seat tools Cost nothing but time

    Made the,work table as well.
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    T man.


    15 + years working for myself, and by golly, I still don't know what I want to do when I grow up.

  9. #9
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    May 2018
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    Re: New to the site, a few projects, and most importantly, here to learn more

    A few years back, I wanted to add ballast weight to the truck, to get better traction during winter season plowing.

    Made up these cages, and I fill each of them with 240 lbs of sand bags or (4) 60 lb bags. Makes the truck ride so much nicer, helps with traction, and I don't worry about anyone messing with anything, or it flying forwards in an abrupt stop.
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    T man.


    15 + years working for myself, and by golly, I still don't know what I want to do when I grow up.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2018
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    Land of the Toxic Avenger
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    Re: New to the site, a few projects, and most importantly, here to learn more

    After discovering that using a welder on top of a couple saw horses got kind of old after a while (and caused fires), I figured I'd make myself a mini work bench / welding station for my little one man shop. I wanted something heavy, so that when I do break rotors, or other heavy repair work on my trucks, I can beat the snot out of whatever I'm working on, and have little to no affect on the table itself.

    I used all 1/4" plate, and the legs are 2x3 thick wall tubing. IIRC, the tubes were also 1/4" thick metal as well. Added (4) HD 3" casters, and designed the height so that I can use it also as an extension table to my chopsaw table I built as well. I didn't think that the 1/4" plate would warp at all, but I found that the edges curled downwards from welding the center structure under the table top. Keep that in the back of my mind whenever I plan something else. Next time, I'll use a thicker material for the top.

    Added 2 shelves, and a bunch of hooks to hang clamps on it. Mounted a bench vice as well.

    I enjoyed every minute of it, and the more I weld, the more control over the weld I get. Seems as though learning to control the positioning of your hands is a big obstacle for us old folks

    That's an older chopsaw I only use on rare occasions, as it generates way too much heat and sparks for my liking.
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    T man.


    15 + years working for myself, and by golly, I still don't know what I want to do when I grow up.

  11. #11
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    Re: New to the site, a few projects, and most importantly, here to learn more

    So, I needed a movable chop saw table to be able to quickly make up parts to weld together when I have a project at hand. Most of the material I had left over, including some of the sheetmetal, but it all worked out just fine. Again, it's on a set of casters, and is the exact same height as my other small work / welding table.

    I wanted the positioning of the chop saw to be able to be variable, so I made up a sled that snug fit the table, but could be moved from left to right, and vice verse. This makes it so I don't have to pull it out to chop up longer pieces.

    Biggest (size) little project I've done so far, and it's worked out quite well....or at least I'm happy with it. Need to add a shelf or two to make it more storage friendly below.
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    Last edited by T man; 05-15-2018 at 04:50 PM.
    T man.


    15 + years working for myself, and by golly, I still don't know what I want to do when I grow up.

  12. #12
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    Re: New to the site, a few projects, and most importantly, here to learn more

    a few more of the fabrication


    I spent 30 years working with that other stuff, and it's come in handy at times....

    lol
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    Last edited by T man; 05-15-2018 at 04:50 PM.
    T man.


    15 + years working for myself, and by golly, I still don't know what I want to do when I grow up.

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