Welding uphill, how to prevent gooping up and blowing out?
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  1. #1

    Welding uphill, how to prevent gooping up and blowing out?

    I am learning how to weld and I'm trying to weld uphill. I have an issue though where gravity takes effect and goops the welds and I keep blowing through my material.

    If I am welding 1/4" plate, is it okay structurally to use a very low wire speed when going uphill? On my MM252 I ended up with a voltage of 18.4 and a wire speed of 160.

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  2. #2
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    Re: Welding uphill, how to prevent gooping up and blowing out?

    Make a t joint fillet weld and try practicing that instead. A thin plate like that has no place for the heat to go.

  3. #3

    Re: Welding uphill, how to prevent gooping up and blowing out?

    I will practice on a t joint tonight. Should I still be aiming for the chart settings or am I fine to use less wire speed?

  4. #4
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    Re: Welding uphill, how to prevent gooping up and blowing out?

    You can put the dials anywhere you want. Those welds aren't much to look at, but at least they are welds. Not like some of the stuff you see on here.

  5. #5
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    Re: Welding uphill, how to prevent gooping up and blowing out?

    uphill always takes a bit less heat. The advise I always heard was drop down one thickness on the door chart settings and go from there.
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  6. #6
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    Re: Welding uphill, how to prevent gooping up and blowing out?

    Quote Originally Posted by Learning View Post
    I will practice on a t joint tonight. Should I still be aiming for the chart settings or am I fine to use less wire speed?
    In my opinion, using a chart setting for metal 1 or 2 sizes thinner than what you are welding works much better.
    Dave J.

    Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance. ~George Bernard Shaw~

    Airco 300 - Syncro 350
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  7. #7

    Re: Welding uphill, how to prevent gooping up and blowing out?

    Quote Originally Posted by MinnesotaDave View Post
    In my opinion, using a chart setting for metal 1 or 2 sizes thinner than what you are welding works much better.
    Thanks a bunch you guys! I assume it is safe to drop down a few sizes going uphill because more time is spent in the area allowing enough penetration?

    For something like butt welding 2x3 tubing together, after tacking, would you do both uphills, and then wait for the piece to cool and adjust the settings higher for the top? I haven't gotten to overhead yet, but I assume for the bottom of the tubing I'd back the settings down again like the sides? Basically one string of weld for each side?

  8. #8
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    Re: Welding uphill, how to prevent gooping up and blowing out?

    welding uphill on thin plate like that can be quite difficult, you're definitely looking at one of the more difficult joint types (similar to capping on a v butt joint on thin plate).

    Generally yes, running low wire speed is absolutely fine in this situation where heat input is important, but if you're wanting to learn vertical doing a t joint is far easier to learn this this as its far more forgiving.
    Last edited by ttoks; 05-19-2018 at 01:48 AM.

  9. #9

    Re: Welding uphill, how to prevent gooping up and blowing out?

    Thanks guys! I decided to do downhill.

    I am working on butt welding tubing. If I want to use an internal fish plate with rosettes (sleeving is not possible), is there any rules of thumb that I should follow as to the size?
    Last edited by Learning; 05-21-2018 at 12:03 PM.

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