petero2490
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Thread: petero2490

  1. #1

    petero2490

    I am an retiree, but have taken up welding at my local community college, I throughly enjoy the challenge as well as the instructors that have aided me so far. I do have a question though, what does "whipping" mean? I am learning to virtual weld on the Lincoln Electric Vertex 360 device, and I do well with all of the parameters but these two issue's:

    1- My whip scores are very inconsistent

    2- My scores for arc length (both too close, and too far) need improvement

    I am wondering if anyone else has trained with this technology from Lincoln Electric, they are wonderful devices but I am not to clear with how to improve my scores to get to an acceptable grade of 90 for passing as set by my instructors. Any help from the forum is greatly appreciated!

    Kind regards,

    Peter

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
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    AJO, ARIZONA
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    Re: petero2490

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
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    499

    Re: petero2490

    When in doubt, I google. I know what a whip is. It is the motion you make with your wrist as you weld. This is a good definition that I found online:
    On open groove welds, a stick welder typically performs a whipping motion with his or her wrist on the root pass, which is the first weld operation performed. The objective here is to fuse the work plates together at the bottom with a flat bead of weld metal.

    Circles, Whips and More
    And this is where technique comes in—we have to use a good technique to make sure the bead is continuous and uniform. Running a flat bead on plate can be done using several different techniques including whip, circle, figure eight, crescent, j, and z. All I've ever seen or used in the field are circles and the whip.

    I first learned circles, then later the whip. Some instructors will tell you the whip is the onlyway, while others advocate circles or both. There are many different techniques in welding applications, and as I've said before, I don't care if you weld standing on your head or gargling purple peanut butter, as long as you produce a sound weld.

    In circles the rod is rotated counter clockwise, pushing back into the puddle, rotating to the front, then again pushing back into the puddle.

    In the whip, the rod is whipped (brought out in a quick motion) out and away from the puddle anywhere from " to 1". (The distance is subjective. It could be more or less.) The rod then is whipped back into the puddle immediately.

    Correctly performed, the circle and whip produce beads that look like dimes laid down overlapping each other.
    Gina M. Tabasso
    HGR Industrial Surplus
    gtabasso@hgrinc.com
    www.hgrinc.com

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