Helmet flip down question
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  1. #1
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    Helmet flip down question

    I have 2 fixed lens Jackson hoods and an auto dark HF hood. If I adjust the tension so they don't drop when I look down, then I can't snap them down when I'm ready to weld.

    I read somewhere that some helmets have a mechanism in them so that doesn't happen. Is that what I'm needing or is there another way to solve my problem.

    With mig and the auto dark hood, I can just reach up and pull it down. With the fixed lens and stick, that doesn't work very well.

  2. #2
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    I switched to an ArcOne auto lens a few years ago. I still nod the hood down.
    You just have to play with the tension on the side nuts, so the hood stays up when you want it to and falls when you want it to.
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  3. #3
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    I always use my free hand to flip the hood down. So i can have it plenty tight to stay up if i need it to.
    I'm 55 years old and have been a truckie in heavy haulage for most of my working live and my back and neck are way past their sell by date. If you are a professional weldor and nod the hood down 100 x a day your neck is gonna be toast 30 years from now. Just my 2c.

    Eric
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  4. #4
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    I've found that if you put some sticky, gummy wax like they use in toilet gaskets ($1 at Home Depot or whatever) on the Frankenstein bolts/nuts, it provides enough "threadlocker" function, and enough lubrication to the hinge, that it becomes really predictable how it behaves, and the Frankenstein bolts stay where you adjust them to.

    That way, you can adjust the nuts to "just barely hold" the shield up, but then easily and predictably let it fall when you nod your head.

    It's the first modification I make every time I get a new shield.

  5. #5
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    Interesting idea, I'll try it.

  6. #6
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    Make sure you get some of the wax on the pivot, cam and detent as well as the threads.

  7. #7
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    Quote Originally Posted by Kelvin View Post
    I've found that if you put some sticky, gummy wax like they use in toilet gaskets ($1 at Home Depot or whatever) on the Frankenstein bolts/nuts, it provides enough "threadlocker" function, and enough lubrication to the hinge, that it becomes really predictable how it behaves, and the Frankenstein bolts stay where you adjust them to.

    That way, you can adjust the nuts to "just barely hold" the shield up, but then easily and predictably let it fall when you nod your head.

    It's the first modification I make every time I get a new shield.
    Those closet wax rings are cheap cheap. I sure hope your using a new closet ring.

  8. #8
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    LOL, I once watched a flock of seagulls go absolutely insane fighting each other to get to a used wax ring in the yard to eat. All at once there were like 100 of them fighting over it! Must have really tasted GOOOD! We were howling! Talk about nasty.

  9. #9
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    Quote Originally Posted by CEP View Post
    I switched to an ArcOne auto lens a few years ago. I still nod the hood down.
    You just have to play with the tension on the side nuts, so the hood stays up when you want it to and falls when you want it to.
    Off topic and not wanting to derail the thread but you can't stick an auto dark lens into any hood that it fits in can you? Doesn't it have to be wired up to a battery and tiny solar panel? The ArcOne lens comes with that?

  10. #10
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    Quote Originally Posted by JD1 View Post
    Off topic and not wanting to derail the thread but you can't stick an auto dark lens into any hood that it fits in can you?
    You sure can, with the ArcOne auto lenses.
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  11. #11
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    Quote Originally Posted by E T View Post
    I always use my free hand to flip the hood down. So i can have it plenty tight to stay up if i need it to.
    I'm 55 years old and have been a truckie in heavy haulage for most of my working live and my back and neck are way past their sell by date. If you are a professional weldor and nod the hood down 100 x a day your neck is gonna be toast 30 years from now. Just my 2c.

    Eric
    Yes, just wait until you're 70! The ol' neck snap is like outta here especially laying flat on your side.The only headgear that I could ever 'tune' was a fiber Hunstsman. Them falling at the wrong time was too much for me so I screw them down and hand them lower.

  12. #12
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    Jackson makes the same auto lens that you can stick in any helmet, including the Jackson.... since you have them. https://weldingsupply.com/cgi-bin/ei...:UNDEF:X:16376
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  13. #13
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    Quote Originally Posted by E T View Post
    I always use my free hand to flip the hood down. So i can have it plenty tight to stay up if i need it to.
    I'm 55 years old and have been a truckie in heavy haulage for most of my working live and my back and neck are way past their sell by date. If you are a professional weldor and nod the hood down 100 x a day your neck is gonna be toast 30 years from now. Just my 2c.

    Eric
    honestly welders have alot more going against them in terms of long term physical health then nodding a welding mask down 100 times a day.

  14. #14
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    When I had the fixed shade I found the key was adjusting and wearing the helmet so that when flipped fully up, it had a slight rearwards lean, and of course adjust the nuts as everyone has said. My problem was sometimes it would be too hard to nod, and I’d have to recheck my hand position to start the weld because the motion would move me slightly from where I wanted to start,

    I’ve got the autodark hood now, and thankfully it’s no longer a problem. The hood is tensioned so it stays up or down, which I use my hand to actuate. And I can see where The tip of my rod is relative to the work. The difference is awesome.

    Quick question, why aren’t you using auto dark for stick? Just because that’s what you have/are supplied? Is the hood you use for MIG adjustable, if so why not use that one?
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  15. #15
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    Quote Originally Posted by ttoks View Post
    honestly welders have alot more going against them in terms of long term physical health then nodding a welding mask down 100 times a day.
    That's true, but you can protect yourself pretty good from the fumes, harmfull light and hot molten metal. A worn out neck from nodding the hood down would be self-inflicted. My neck and back are already worn, so i make a habit of lowering the hood by hand. One visit a month to my chiropractor is expensive enough.

    Eric
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  16. #16
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    Ive done alot of welding in the last 20 years and i grab the hood to lower.

  17. #17
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    Quote Originally Posted by E T View Post
    That's true, but you can protect yourself pretty good from the fumes, harmfull light and hot molten metal. A worn out neck from nodding the hood down would be self-inflicted. My neck and back are already worn, so i make a habit of lowering the hood by hand. One visit a month to my chiropractor is expensive enough.

    Eric
    This is right on the money!
    I still use the manual hood that was bought new in 1967.
    I've never nodded it down.
    But I broke my neck in 1974 and wouldn't be able to nod it down anyway!

  18. #18
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    Quote Originally Posted by Mmock4 View Post
    Quick question, why aren’t you using auto dark for stick? Just because that’s what you have/are supplied? Is the hood you use for MIG adjustable, if so why not use that one?
    I do. I found out it was impossible for me to use a fixed hood with stick, whether nodding it down or pulling it down. I wind up starting the weld somewhere it shouldn't be started. However, I've seen videos of so many stick welders nodding down and doing fine welds I thought maybe there's some trick I haven't learned yet.

    That's why I mentioned the cam in my first post. I think I learned that from a comment on one of Jody's videos. Apparently from the posts in this thread, that's not a common item.

    The lens in one of the Jackson's seems a little clearer than the one in my HF hood and I thought I might work with it if there was some way to deal with the tension. The wax ring thing might help, I haven't tried it yet.

  19. #19
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    "I do. I found out it was impossible for me to use a fixed hood with stick, whether nodding it down or pulling it down. I wind up starting the weld somewhere it shouldn't be started. However, I've seen videos of so many stick welders nodding down and doing fine welds I thought maybe there's some trick I haven't learned yet."

    Suggestion #1:
    I do almost all my welding outside in the sunshine year round(one of the advantages of living in Texas).
    One day I was welding in my shop and I noticed I couldn't see anything. That's when the light bulb went on!
    I drug my project out into the sunshine and sure enough I could see just fine again.
    Strong lighting makes a difference even after the arc is struck.

    Suggestion #2

    I've noticed that a lot of welders run much darker lenses than I do, sometimes as high as a 12 for stick.
    I run a 9 in my hood, I've never had spots in my vision after welding.
    I think there is no "one size fits all" for welding lenses.
    Try several different shades to see which shade works best for you.

  20. #20
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    I mean, it’s probably a good thing to be used to both. But if I’ve got myself leaned up against something with a full length stick electrode ready to weld, I far and away prefer the autodarkening hood. Mainly because I just leave the hood down, and setup to weld. No “hoping” my electrode is still in the right spot when I nod the hood down, the most aggravating thing about fixed shade is measuring and cutting/grinding damn thing closes down on me everytime.

    Good thing about fixed shade though, is they don’t fail unless they’re physically broken. No electronics, or batteries.

    But given the choice, I’d choose a good autodark for any type of welding, stick included. If I were working somewhere isolated I’d carry a fixed shade for a spare.
    -Mark Smith

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  21. #21
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    Quote Originally Posted by Mmock4 View Post
    I mean, it’s probably a good thing to be used to both. But if I’ve got myself leaned up against something with a full length stick electrode ready to weld, I far and away prefer the autodarkening hood. Mainly because I just leave the hood down, and setup to weld. No “hoping” my electrode is still in the right spot when I nod the hood down
    That's exactly it. And if it's not in the right spot because it moved when you got your hood down, then you're fixing something later. Auto dark only for me for stick. Mig's not so bad with a fixed shade, you can hold it tight against where you want it and nothing happens until you pull the trigger.

    I hunted on Google for that hood I saw on Jody's video and couldn't find it. Don't remember the brand or which video it was in. But I was sure he said something about an internal cam to help with the staying up/nodding down issue.

  22. #22
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    I started out welding with a fixed shade. Can do everything with it. But now going to auto darkeing who in there right mind would want to mess with fixed shade lenses.
    Ive heard welders say your not a real welder unless you use a fixed shade but for me i could careless what any real welders think of me. Those old farts can have all the fixed shades.

  23. #23
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    Quote Originally Posted by evan View Post
    I started out welding with a fixed shade. Can do everything with it. But now going to auto darkeing who in there right mind would want to mess with fixed shade lenses.
    Ive heard welders say your not a real welder unless you use a fixed shade but for me i could careless what any real welders think of me. Those old farts can have all the fixed shades.
    I'm an old fart, but i agree with you.

    Might be different if your pipelining or such though. Those hoods get knocked arround a fair bit and the cheaper they are the better.

    Eric
    Last edited by E T; 07-15-2018 at 03:54 PM.
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  24. #24
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    Quote Originally Posted by evan View Post
    I started out welding with a fixed shade. Can do everything with it. But now going to auto darkeing who in there right mind would want to mess with fixed shade lenses.
    Ive heard welders say your not a real welder unless you use a fixed shade but for me i could careless what any real welders think of me. Those old farts can have all the fixed shades.
    I've never seen an autodark that gave as good a view of the puddle as a fixed shade, and I have a pretty good one (Miller Digital Elite).

    Any more, I only use the autodark for tacking or in weird positions (under the truck for example) where I'm on my side or it's hard to nod the hood down.

    No comparison between my fixed-shade shields and autodarks. Autodarks suck. Maybe that's why so many "real welders" use fixed shade. Or maybe OSHA doesn't approve autodarks...? (Seems like my welding instructor might have said that a few years back.)
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  25. #25
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    Re: Helmet flip down question

    Quote Originally Posted by evan View Post
    I started out welding with a fixed shade. Can do everything with it. But now going to auto darkeing who in there right mind would want to mess with fixed shade lenses.
    Ive heard welders say your not a real welder unless you use a fixed shade but for me i could careless what any real welders think of me. Those old farts can have all the fixed shades.
    I used to despise auto darkening welding helmets for some reason, now i've become a massive fan.

    I still use a fixed shade for almost all of my TIG welding just because it's lighter and less strain on the body, but only because with TIG is pretty easy to start where you want and there less or no fumes to breath in, for almost all stick and MIG welding I use my speedglas adflo, even just for the fact I'm not breathing that crap in it's well worth it, but it also makes it really easy to strike the arc where I want to.

    work smarter not harder right?

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